Skip to main content

Full text of "Noe Valley Voice"

See other formats


Vol. XVI, No. 8 




October 1992 



THE N OE VALLEY VOICE 

Oil Leak 
Makes a Mess 
For Dan's Gas, 
Neighbors Too 



By Denise Minor 

One morning last March. Roberta Mc- 
Gowan's two young girls looked out their 
window at 308 Vicksburg St. and started 
lumping up and down with excitement. 

"It looked to them like someone was 
setting up a swing set on the sidewalk in 
front of our house." said McGowan. 

What appeared to be playground equip- 
ment to the children was actually the A- 
frame tor a drill to test ground water for 
contamination. The test was being con- 
ducted, she later found out. because the 
gas station bordering her property had 
discovered that its underground waste oil 
storage tank was leaking. 

That discovery, said McGowan. was the 
beginning of a six-month nightmare. "'We 
have a 75-foot redwood tree in the back 
yard that leans to one side and has brown 
leaves." she said. 

"There has been a positive sample of 
contaminated soil taken at the base of the 
tree. My kids used to play under that tree 
all the time. Their feet walked on that 
ground." McGowan continued. 

Now the back yard is off limits to the 
girls But McGowan and her husband, 
Maurice McGowan, are still afraid of the 
health risks posed by living next to an oil 
spill. "It's been six months, and we still 
haven't received any report letting us 
know how big this thing is." 

Wayne Rosemont. proprietor of Dan's 
Gas and Auto Service at 3865 24th St., 

Continued on Page 5 




Dun's Gus owner Wuyne Rosemont mux be smiling in this pic ture, hut it 's definitely not ufun 
lime to be in the service station business. He and his landlord, John McCarthy, have had to 
shell out nearly $100,000 to arrange for clean-up of an underground oil leak. And if the 
neighbors' yards are contaminated, the toll will go much higher, photo BY BtvtRLY TllARP 



24th Street a Good Host 
For Ghosts on Halloween 



Supervisor 
Achtenberg 
Talks Taxes, 
Libraries, 
Giants, Jordan 
And Clinton 

By Kdthy Dalle-Molle 

When Roberta Achtenberg was elected 
to the San Francisco Board of Super- 
visors in November 1990, many Noe Val- 
ley residents felt like they "get their own. 
personal voice on the Board." in the 
words of Achtenberg aide Alex Clemens. 

A resident of the neighborhood since 
1972. Achtenberg has indeed been a vocal 
proponent of many neighborhood issues, 
including saving the Noe Valley Senior 
Center's lunch program and the branch 
library on Jersey Street. As a supervisor, 
she has helped obtain health benefits for 
domestic partners, and has been instru- 
mental in pursuing a water reclamation 
policy, clarifying the city's wrongful evic- 
tion laws, and ensuring better sidewalk ac- 
cessibility for people using wheelchairs. 

This year, she jumped into the national 
political fray as the northern California 
co-chair of Bill Clinton's presidential 
campaign. In July, as a co-drafter of the 
Democratic Party platform, she drew na- 
tionwide attention when she became the 
first open lesbian to address a major party 
convention. 

The Voice recently sat down w ith Ach- 
tenberg in her City Hall office to discuss 
San Francisco politics and her involvement 

Continued on Page 7 



By Casey D'Anca Salm 
and Grace D'Anca 

Last year the Voice received numerous 
reports that Downtown Noe Valley was 
haunted on Halloween, so this year the 
paper asked a fearless mother-daughter 
team — that's us — to investigate the de- 
lights and frights that 24th Street mer- 
chants had in store for neighborhood res- 
idents on Saturday. Oct. 31. 

We discovered that most shopkeepers 
were lit up like jack-o' : lanterns, in antici- 
pation of giving candy and treats to the 
young — and young at heart — who'll be 
prowling and howling that night. 

They told us that the 24th Street fes- 
tivities would get under way late morn- 
ing, with a preview of preschool pump- 
kins, and would continue until 7 or 8 in 
the evening, when most of the shops give 
up the ghost. 

Small Frys, the children's clothing 
store at 4066 24th St, will reprise the 
pumpkin-carving contest it launched last 
year. "We invite neighborhood kids to 
bring in their carved or decorated pump- 
kins, so we can display them in our front 
window and award prizes," said store 
owner Carol Yenne. 

Yenne asks Noe Valley's little pumpkin 



designers to bring their creations to the 
store on Oct. 29 and not before, "because 
we don't want them to get mushy." She 
added that neighborhood judges would 
pick the winners starting at 11 a.m. on 
Halloween day. 

For the past 23 years, Shufat Market, 
at 24th and Church, has been passing out 
treats, and that's no easy trick. 

"We just started doing it with the other 
merchants back then. Tootsie Rolls are 
the kids' favorite," said Shufat owner 
James Omar, handing one to our cub re- 
porter. 

Eric Flaherty, tending store at Phoenix 
Books and Records at 3850 24th St. , said 
he wasn't on board last year, but that he 
was sure Phoenix would do something 
enticing this All Hallows Eve. 

"Knowing the group we have working 
here, they'll probably be decking out 
Halloween night and quite likely giving 
candy," Flaherty said with a mischievous 
grin. 

Over at Double Rainbow, 3933 24th 
St.. employee Alysia Gonzales said the 
ice cream shop's colorful cadre of work- 
ers was prepared to dish out special treats 
to costumed customers. She then treated 

Continued on Page 5 




Small Frys owner Carol Yenne almost went batty when she met up with Casey DAnca Salm, 
disguised as a mild-mannered Voice reporter. But after making a small flap, she revealed that 
the store would hold a pumpkin-carving contest for kids this Halloween. PHOTO BY TOM wachs 



Page 2 



The Noe Valley Voice ' October 1992 



LETTER S 2 9 ft 




Tired of the 'Vigilante' Voice 

Editor: 

For some years I have enjoyed reading 
the Noe Valley Voice Those days, alas, 
are over, now that the paper appears to 
have turned into a sell -promoting vehicle 
for Police Officer Lois Perillo. 

In her column in your July/August is- 
sue. Ms. Perillo lowers the standards of 
your paper by continuing to gloat over 
what she obviously believes to be her 
greatest coup — the persecution and hound- 
ing of Gary Kappes. 24th Street's erst- 
while gentle panhandler. 

As an attorney. I happened to be in the 
Bryant Street courtroom several months 
ago and witnessed Ms. Perillo's attempts 
to orchestrate what can best be described 
as a lynch mob ol "indignant" Noe Valley 
residents. Ms. Perillo's actions were a dis- 
grace to her badge and an insult to the 
court, which she shamelessly attempted 
to manipulate. 

Now that that "vicious criminal" Gary 
has been exiled from Happy Valley and a 
Golden Age has been issued in. we learn 
from Ms. Perillo herself that her actions 
may not have been so selfless alter all For 
has she not. she proudly tells us, applied 
to and been accepted for a spot on the San 
Francisco Drug Abuse Advisory Board. 
Nice career move, Lois, even though 
some grizzled cynics like myself may feel 
that you know as much about drugs, their 
abuse, and the rehabilitative methods 
needed, as a cow knows about having a 
holiday. 

But it gets worse. Several issues ago. 
Lois modestly told us about her heroism 
when she held off the hordes of anarchy 
after the Rodney King verdict and helped 
arrest hundreds of innocent people — who 
are now suing the city and going to cost 
us taxpayers a pretty penny because of 
Hongisto's ham-handed actions. And again. 
Perillo chooses to tell us that as a result 
of a complaint from one of her anonymous 
informants, Gary Kappes now faces revo- 
cation of his probation. Hasn't this officer 
ever heard of due process? Innocent until 
proven guilty? 

Apparently not — and nor, it seems, 
has your paper. Also in the July issue, 
you have a page-one feature that reports 
a totally one-sided police story regarding 
the capture of an alleged would-be shop- 
lifter. Compounding your error you also 
give the name of the alleged perpetrator, 
and inform us that he has a "long rap 
sheet." How can this guy get a fair trial 
when he has already been convicted in 
your paper? 



Like many others, I believe that your 
paper should return to its rightful role as 
a community newspaper — not the "Vigi- 
lante News" or the election campaign 
sheet of wannabe politicians such as Lois 
Perillo. 

John McGuffin 
Law Offices of John McGuffin & 
Frank D'Alfonsi 
West Portal Avenue 




.4 Little Fuzzy on the 
Point of Piercing 



Editor: 

Regarding your piece on body piercing 
in your September edition: 1 have no ob- 
jection to this type of "self-expression." 
but how does Carrie Field's piercing of 
her nose. chin, and cheek draw attention 
to people suffering in the world, as she 
states? Sounds like some pretty foggy 
thinking to me. Am I missing something? 

Judith Malina 
Texas Street 

J-Church Extension 

Still Getting the Runaround 

Editor: 

As both a resident of Noe Valley and a 
transit planner for Muni, I feel I must 
respond to the letter in your September 
issue from Landis Whistler, the director 
of the Stonestown Tenants Association. 

Mr. Whistler alleges that Muni could 
start "loop service" tomorrow, through- 
routing J and M cars so that Noe Valley 
residents could access Stonestown Mall 
and San Francisco State University di- 
rectly. That is correct, except for the little 
matter of a half a million dollars in addi- 
tional yearly operating costs that today's 
tight budget does not provide. 

Because the M-line is run as a two-car 
train all day, while the J's are single cars 
(M ridership is roughly twice the J rider- 
ship), the only way that M's and J's can 
be efficiently and economically through- 
routed is with the construction of turn- 
back tracks, to be used for every second 
M-car. in the 19th Avenue median strip 
near S.F.S.U. and Stonestown. 

In an effort to perform Muni's service 
planning task, residents of the Stones- 
tow n/Lakeside area have suggested a num- 
ber of alternative operating scenarios, all 



of which are impractical, either because 
of the excess vehicle-hours or vehicle- 
miles they would require Muni to run. or 
because of scheduling problems (i.e.. no 
operator rest breaks, no opportunities to 
recover from traffic delays). 

Mr. Whistler complains about the lack 
of an environmental impact report on 
Muni's 19th Avenue project. In fact, state 
and federal laws define very clearly the 
categories of projects that require such 
reports, and improvements within exist- 
ing transportation rights-of-way (such as 
19th Avenue) are specifically exempted. 

He also complains of "constant chang- 
es in information supplied" by Muni. In 
fact, what he characterizes as "changes" 
has simply been new information sup- 
plied in response to each new objection 
that his neighbors have raised to the pro- 
posed project 

These objections, though they take 
many forms, are all raised in order to 
prevent Muni from achieving its goal of 
greater operating efficiency by construct- 
ing the 19th Avenue layover tracks. 

Mr Whistler and certain of his neigh- 
bors fear two things: the inconvenience 
that 10 months of construction would 
cause them, and the supposed decrease 
in their property values that trains laying 
over between runs (as they do at 30th and 
Church) would precipitate. All of their 
concerns about safety are related to the 
enormous volume of traffic that clogs 
19th Avenue — traffic that Muni is simply 
trying to play a role in reducing. 

Jim Nelson 
Whitney Street 




Prop. H Would Put a Stop 
To Arbitrarily Inflated Rents 

Editor: 

As a senior and longtime Noe Valley 
resident. I urge everyone who cares 
about the future of our community to 
vote yes on Proposition H this November. 

Proposition H is a simple measure that 
would delete just four words from the 
current city rent law. These four words — 
"not less than 4%" — guarantee landlords 
4 percent rent increases, regardless of 
decreases in the inflation rate. Although 
the recession has deepened, tenants arc 
still required to pay annual rent increases 



THE NOE VALLEY VOICE 
1021 Sanchez Street 
San Francisco, CA 94114 

The Not Voiles Voice i\ an independent news- 
paper published monthly except in January and 
August. It is distributed ft ee in Noc Valley and 
vicinity. Mail subscriptions are available at a COSI 
Qf SI5 per year (S^ per year lor seniors) by writing 
to the above address The Voice welcomes your 
letters, photos, artwork, and manuscripts How 
ever, all such items must include your name .id 
dress, and phone number, and may be edited lor 
brevity or clarity (Unsigned letters to the editor 
will not be considered lor publication l Unsolicited 
contributions will be returned only il accompanied 
hj I sell-addressed, stamped envelope 

Editorial Message Machine: 821-3324 
Subscriptions: Scott Paterson, 206-1910 
Distribution: Misha Yagudin. 752-1726 

Display Advertising ()nl\ : 

Call Steve at 239-1114 
Classified Ads: See Page 39 

Advertising Deadline for the 
November 1992 Issue: Oct. 16 
Editorial Deadline: Oct. IS 

PUBLISHERS ■■'MANAGING EDITORS 
Sally Smith. Jack Tipple 

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS 
Karol Barskc. Jeff Kaliss. Charles Kennard 
Susan Koop. Su/annc Scott. Jane Underwood 

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS. DESIGNERS 
AND PHOTOGRAPHERS 
Jeanne Alexander. Mehnda Breiimeyer. 
Nancy Carroll. Ed Buryn. Kalhy Dalle-Mollc. 
Grace D'Anca. Michael Eisman. Rick (Jarncr. 
Pamela Gerard. B L Green. Najih Joe Hakim 
Laura Holland. Florence Holub. Crystal Land. 
Michele Lynn. Denise Minor. SCOII Palerson. 

Manclla Poll. Roger Ruhin. Tom Scott. 
Steve Steinberg. Beverly Tharp. Tom Wachs. 
Lorene Warwick 

PHIMI l> ON RECYCLED PAPf K 
Content C IW2 The Noc Valley Voice 



ILLUSTRATIONS BY KAROL BARSKE 

well beyond increases in landlord ex- 
penses. 

As a senior, I have seen the interest on 
my savings account cut to 2 percent. I 
also see 90 percent of my Social Security 
cost-of-living adjustments going directly 
to pay for my 4 percent annual rent in- 
crease. Our incomes are losing ground 
every year, and we need the immediate 
relief. 

I have always loved Noe Valley for its 
diversity. Unless Proposition H passes, 
however, our elderly residents and youny 
families will be unable to continue to 
afford to live here. Homeowners and 
landlords with adjustable rate mortgages 
have seen a decline in their housing costs 
due to the recession; tenants also deserve 
to pay less when times are tough 

Proposition H will maintain our neigh- 
borhood's diversity and help people like 
me continue to live here. I urge our com- 
munity to vote yes on Proposition H 

Miriam Blaustein 
Army Street 





4018 24TH STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 
94114 

Tel: 285-9743 



^ ^ 10 Gallon 
tr~7-^-^ Deluxe 
I5^."»^J Aquarium Kit 

^ $29.99 

j Just Add Gravel & Water • October Only 


20 Gallon Saltwater Start Kit 
with Wet/Dry. Heater. Salt & Hydr. 

$117.99 

Just Add Gravel & Water 
October Only 


55 Gallon Freshwater Aq Kit 

Includes Tank. Hood, Fixture, Under Gravel 
Filter, Air Pump. Heater & Therm 

October Only $129.99 


Disney's 

The Little Mermaid 
Aquarium Kit 

$25.99 

October Only 


i 20% OFF 

! ALL FRESHWATER FISH 

(except feeders) 

Expires October 15, 1992 


20% OFF 
ALL SALTWATER 
FISH 

Expires October 15. 1992 


20% OFF 
ALL LIVE PLANTS 

Expires October 15. 1992 


i 
i 

One Free 
Comet Goldfish 

with this coupon 

October Only 




OT ALL ART 
NEEDS A FRAME 




Pin by 
Jennifer Co»e 



AMERICAN 

CONTEMPORARY 

CRAFTS 

Out of Hand 

1303 CASTRO AT 24TH 
SAN FRANCISCO 
826-3885 



I he Not Valley Voue ■ October 1992 



Page 3 





Local Cops 
Go Easy on 
Jaywalking, But 
Advise Caution 

By Kathy Dalle-Molle 

Faced with a substantial increase in pe- 
destrian accidents, particularly in the 
downtown Financial District, the San 
Francisco Police Department in August 
stepped up enforcement of jaywalking 
laws and began issuing $55 tickets to 
violators. 

Pedestrians in Noe Valley, however, 
seemed unphased by the situation. Around 
noon on Sept. 8, the Voice spotted 
jaywalker alter jay walker weaving through 
cars on the busy stretch of 24th Street 
between Castro and Church. 

' I really don't have time to talk to you 
now," was a typical response among the 
several jaywalkers the Voice caught in 
the act. 

"I know jaywalking is against the law" 
a shop owner told us, "but I'm still going 
to do it. On a street like 24th Street, you 
have to jaywalk to get around. And the 
cars move slowly around here." 

Fortunately for the pedestrians, 24th 
Street beat cops Lois Perillo and Lor- 
raine Lombardo have decided against cit- 
ing neighborhood jaywalkers, for now. 

"It's just not a priority as far as we're 
concerned." said Perillo. "There are a lot 
more pressing issues in the neighborhood." 

Perillo also pointed out that no serious 
pedestrian accidents had occurred in Noe 
Valley in the 2 l /z years since she started 
her 24th Street patrols. 

Lombardo echoed Perillo's sentiments, 
but noted. "If the community does want 
us to enforce the law. then we can cer- 
tainly bring this up for discussion. We're 
happy to work with the community in 
any way we can. But we'd have to give 
people a fair amount of warning before 



Twen tx -fourth Street Beat Officer Lorraine Lombardo believes that the police would have a hard time enforcing the city's ja\ u alking law in 
Noe Valley, unless there were a crosswalk in front of Bell Market. PHOTO BY TOM WAGHS 



enforcement began." 

Lombardo added that one of the most 
popular jaywalking spots in the neigh- 
borhood was in front of Bell Market, on 
24th Street between Sanchez and Noe. 

"It's too long of a block for people to 
walk to get to the end and legally cross 
to the other side of the street," she said. 
"I think it would be unreasonable to en- 
force the jaywalking rule without a cross- 
walk at Bell Market. Handicapped peo- 
ple and the elderly simply cannot make it 
all the way to the end of the block, where 
they can legally cross the street." 

However. Lombardo cautioned, "I have 
been frightened a few times because I've 
seen jaywalkers almost get clipped by 
cars. And I know that one day someone 



is going to get it. Most drivers in Noe 
Valley, though, seem to be aware that 
there are a lot of jaywalkers, and so they 
have a tendency to look out for them and 
drive a little slower. 

"What really frightens me. though, is 
when I see parents jaywalking with their 
children." she continued. "I don't cite 
them, but I do give them a lecture. 

"I don't think it's right to be teaching 



a 3- or 4-year-old child to jaywalk. I hate 
to stop and bother people, but I worry 
about this. I don't like them teaching this 
habit to children who can't make their 
own choices yet. 

"If as an adult you're willing to take 
the risk, that's line. It's your decision 
to make. You may get hurt, but it's 
your choice. But don't teach it to your 
children" □ 




ARBOR'VITAE # 

TREE SERVICE 

TOTAL TREE QIO r riA 
HEALTHCARE OiZ-JjZU 




Expert Pruning & Removal 

Total Tree Health Care 

Soil Aeration, Fertilization 
Disease Diagnosis & Treatment 
Arbor Plant Care 
Maintenance Program 

Consultation Services 

Tree Evaluation Reports: Appraisals; 

Pruning Specifications 



• Fully Insured 

Liability & Workers' Comp. 

• Licensed Contractor #442370 

• Licensed Pest Control Advisor #7590 

• Licensed Pest Control Operator #5102 

ED BRENNAN 

CERTIFIED ARBORIST #10S 

1176 Shatter Avenue, San Francisco 



RUDY PAUL 
JEWELERS 



Designers and Creators of Fine Jewelry 

Have you had your diamonds 
checked lately? 

3915-C 24th Street 
Hours: Wednesday - Sunday 11 am - 5 pm 
In the Noe Valley Mall (behind the Courtyard Cafe) 

641-4720 



Please Join Us for a Celebration! 




Saturday, October 31st 

CHLOE'S CAFE 

1399 Church Street 
Celebrates its 
Fifth Year Anniversary 

Proceeds to benefit 

Project Open Hand 



HERTH 



REALTY AND INVESTMENTS 



Specialists for 
Upper Market • Twin Peaks 
Noe Valley Properties 



555 CASTRO ST. 861-5200 



Page 4 



The Noe Valley Voice • Ot loner /w- 



NOE'S BAR 



GRILL 




New Menu — New Prices! 

Gourmet Burgers and Sandwiches at Lower Prices 
More Salads to Choose from! • Mix and Match Pasta 

otisser/e Chicken — Here or To Go 



STARTERS 



Chili < on ( arnr „ cu[ 

Saulrrd Mushrooms & 

Girlie Bread 

Buffalo Wings (spicy or II II gjf 

Garlic Bread 

Onion Him 1 

Fried Calamari 

Cajun Popcorn (when <i\ail0e/ 



[.85 Bowl $2.95 



Deep Fried Clam Strips. ...M. 

French Fries 

/.urrhini Slicks ,, 

Fried Mozzarrlla 

Slcamrd ( lams __„..., 

Steamed MuueU 

Shrimp Cocktail 



r$4.95 
. $5.75 
. $3.95 
U $2.50 
. $2.95 
.$4.75 
. $5.95 
$SJ5 
.$6.25 



SOUPOMTHE DAY 
BP $1-50 I Bowl Sl.sl 



SALAD 



D*e Salad . 
inn. r Salad 



Warm Vegetable Salad (blanched vegetables 

served over mixed greens) — 

Warm Chicken Salad 

(full skinless breast of chicken broiled A 

served over mixed greens! .___ „,... 

( aesar Salad 

(tender hearts of romaine tossed w' our own 
Caesar dressing A toasted croutons) , 

Chicken Caesar Salad 

Greek Salad 

(fresh tossed green w/ imported hela cheese, 
(irtek olives and other goodies) 



$4.50^ 

, $2.75 



. $3.95 



. $6.50 



. $5.50 
, $7.25 



Shrimp & Avocado Salad (lender bay shnmp A 
avocado served over hearts of romaine) . 
Fresh Ahi I una Salad (when available) 

Jed A hi Tuna served over hearts a 



CHOICE OK DRESSINGS 

Blur ( becsc. Thousand bland. Ranch 
Oil A Vinegar or Creamy Kalian. 
< aexar add $.25 



$6.75 
S6.9S 

$9.95 



BURGERS A SANDWICHES 

Build Yourself A Famous NOK BURGER !! 
We'll start you off with: 

1/4 lb $3.75 

1/2 lb $5.25 

1.0 lb $7.75 

of Fresh Ground Chuck! 

you choose the bread and any of the following 

Items to create the_ 

" BEST BURGER IN TOWN " 

BREADS 

Sour Dough Roll, Sesame Burger Bun, 
English Muffin. Rye, Wheal 
or Sliced Sour Dough. 

EXTRAS 

grilled onions, garlic, spinach, 
or tangy R.B.Q. sauce. $ .50 each. 
Avocado, chili, bacon, sauleed mushrooms 
or artichoke hearts. $ .US each. 

CHEESES 

a, Blue, FcU 
or Monarclla $.50 each 

Add ar\ of the above items to any sandwich below and 
create your own special 



Italian, 
Sausai 
(hick 



■ usage Sandwich 

farmigiana Sandwich 
Breast Sandwich __ 



-$S.SS 
.$6.50 



in Parmigiana Sandwich 
fork Strip Sandwich 



II v ( heese Steak Sandwich 

Peal Cutlet Sandwich 

Prawn Sandwich „ , 

Fish Filet Sandwich 



$5.95 

$6.50 

~$7.7S 

$6.50 



-$7.50 
..$6.50 
-$5.95 



Broiled Ahi- 1 una Sandwich (when available) $7.25 

Broiled Eggplant Sandwich $* o< 



I 



• 1/7 order can be prepared 1/2 price * SI. 00 

All Burger* A Sanwicbe* are Served With 
Your Choice of F ries, Pasta or Small Salad. 



ISK VOI R SERVER ABOUT OUR DAn.Y LUNCH St DINNER SPECIALS 
We are proud to offer a 10% senior citizen discount 



POULTRY 

Our Own Rotisacrie Chicken: 

Half _. $6.2$ Whole _ $9.25 

(please state w or w'o B D Q sauce) 

mil chicken dishes below are prepared 
with a whole t /unless breast of chu ken 



Jilcken Ms malls 

. M arsalla wine dash | 

OrtdoST - 

garlic) 



•fuller 



_ $9.95 

( hlckeo Dure (dipped in a herbed egg batter 

saulied w. wine, lemon, butter garlic) __„^$9.95 
< hlckeo Picatta 

(capers, wine, butter, lemon, dash garlic) __ 
Chicken parmigiana (I'armigian A mouurtllo 

cheese, red sauce, wine A garlic) ________ $10.29 

Chicken Carciofi (mushrooms, artichoke hearts. 

cream, butter, green onions, garlic) _____ $10.95 
Chicken Joe's Special (diced chicken, mushrooms. 

spinach, egg. onions A garlic) $8.25 

MEAT 

Veal I oln ( hop (Large tender veal chop topped with 

saulied mushrooms) ___...._ . $14.95 

Filet Mignon $13.95 

New York Strip $12.95 

lamb Chops (loin cut) $10.95 



Center Cut Pork Chops $9.95 

Hamburger Steak S8.S0 

Veal Gaetano 

(mushrooms, capers, wine, garlic) ______ $| 1.25 

Veal Dijon 

(DiJOn mustard, cream, butter, garlic) $10.95 

\ eal Picalta 

(capers, wine butter, lemon) $10.95 



Veal Parmigiana (Parmigian A moziartlla 

cheese, red sauce, wine A garlic) 

Veal Scalopplni 

(mushrooms, win*, garlic, A demi-glaze) - 
Breaded Veal Cutlet 

(win*, butttr. garlic. Itmon) ________ 

Veal Marsalla 

(mushrooms. Marsalla win*, dash butttr) 

Joe's Special (ground chuck., mushrooms, spinach 

egg. onions A garlic) - 



$11.25 



.$11.25 



. $9.75 



$11.25 



$8.50 



PASTA 

lis. the pasta St sauces below to create your (avorite. 

Fettuccine, Rotelli, Linguine or Spinach Fettuccine. 
Ravioli add $1.00 

The following dishes may be served with: 
Marinara, Olive Oil St Garlic or Butter & (.arltc. 

Alfredo Peslo or Tomato Cream add SI 00 



Pasta with sauce 
Italian Sausage - 
Baby Clams 



-S5.9S 



Fresh Mussels A Clams (in shell! 

< sin man 

Bay Shrimp - __ 

Tiger Prawns 



Primavera (steamed mixed vegetables) 



SEAFOOD 



$7.95 

$7.95 

—$10.50 

$7.75 

$9.95 

__$I0.75 
$7.25 



A.Q. 



Fresh Fbb Of The Day 
Prawn Dorc (prawns in an herbed egg hatter A 

saulied w wine, lemon, butter, garlic) CM.<n 
Sauteed Prawns {mushrooms onion, wine butter 

lemon, garlic) ._._ SI 1 75 

Sauteed Calamari (mushrooms, onion, wine. 

butter, lemon, garlic) _ $10.25 

Seafood Combo 

(red snapper, prawns, calamari mushrooms. 

onion, wine, butter, lemon, garlu) _ —SI 1.95 

Deep Fried Prawns $1 1-*0 

Fish St Chips (does not include vtgtiublts) — $7.75 



Fried Calamari Dinner 
Steamed Mussels 
Steamed Clams _ 



Steamed Mussels A Clams 



....$8.95 
„$9.95 
__$9.75 



\ EGET \BI.I S 

Eggplant Parmigiana (I'armigian A moz:arella 

cheese, red sauce, win* A garlu) — $8.50 

Sauteed Vegetables or Sauteed Spinach $3-25 

Vegetable F rittata (Italian omelet w fresh mixed 

vegetables, eggs, garlic, herbs A otivt oil) $5.95 



All Entrees arc served w/ sauteed vegetables 
and your choice of pasta or French fries. 



A HH granary will h. add* ,o p*«,„ „/« „, __„ w . m „, ,,j,,fr|thjta ,„„ , 

AU ITEMS MAYBE PREPARED TO GO 



• ifrtim i fr* en* 



VEGETARIAN SELECTIONS • FULL BAR • LARGE CHILDREN'S MENU 

Don't Forget Our Daily Breakfast & Saturday and Sunday Brunch (9 am-2 pm) 

Located at the Corner of 24th & Church 

695-2949 



Open Monday-Thursday 


8 am-10 


pm 


Friday 


8 am-l 1 


pm 


Saturday 


9 am-l 1 


pm 


Sunday 


9 am-10 


pm 




The Noe Valley Voire • October 1992 



Cleanup Could Take 5 to 10 Years 



Continued from Page I 

said he discovered the leak in 1991 when 
another neighbor noticed oil seeping out 
of the ground behind the station. Rose- 
mont and property owner John McCarthy 
hired Gen-Tech Environmental of San Jose 
to investigate. 

"Apparently, the filler pipe running from 
the back of the station to the waste oil 
tank rotted away and was leaking." Rose- 
mont said. Gen-Tech removed the tank 
and pipes in March of 1991. piled all the 
dirt from the 20-foot-deep hole next to 
where the tank was, and began treating 
the soil. 

Gen-Tech President Stuart Solomon 
said the earth from around the tank was 
mixed this summer with a biological 
microorganism that speeds degeneration 
of hydrocarbons. 

"It's basically a hybrid that eats petro- 
hydrocarbons and converts them into non- 
toxic waste. It can be applied to soil or 
ground water or both to eliminate toxi- 
city," Solomon explained. 

If the pollution does indeed extend to 
the McGowans' property, or to any other 
neighbor's property (Gen-Tech engineers 
have determined that the original under- 
ground oil spill was flowing in a south- 
easterly direction), Rosemont and Mc- 
Carthy are afraid that they will not have 
the money to pay for the cleanup. 

"I have personally already put $30,000 
into paying for this, and the landlord 
[McCarthy] has put in $68,000," said 
Rosemont. 

"When I got this station seven years 
ago, I was told that all the tanks were 
fine. Well, obviously they weren't." 

McCarthy believes that the real respon- 
sibility for the oil spill lies with Shell Oil 
Company, which leased the property 
from 1960 to 1980. "Since Shell left, 
we've measured all the oil that's gone 
down into that tank and all that's come 
out, and we never came up short. So we 
think the leak happened years ago," said 
McCarthy. 

"I suspect Shell knew about it too, and 
that's why they didn't want to renew their 
lease." 

McCarthy hired attorney Greg Garrison 
to take Shell Oil to court on the matter, 
but Garrison refused to comment on the 
case last month since it was still pending. 

Wendy Ho Iwata, spokesperson for the 
city's Bureau of Toxics, Health, and Safe- 
ty Services, said further investigation of 
the soil could make or break McCarthy's 
case against Shell Oil. 

"We can, in effect, fingerprint the con- 
tamination to tell if it matches the type 
of oil used by Shell at the site versus the 
type used by the station there now," she 
said. 

Iwata's bureau oversees the cleanup of 
500 documented cases of ground con- 
tamination in San Francisco. So far, she 
said, she has not been satisfied with Gen- 
Tech's progress at Dan's Gas. 

"We've given them a list of the 10 
things that they need to do to comply 
with state law, including hiring a tree 
specialist to analyze the redwood in the 
McGowans' yard, backfill the excavated 
soil at the station, and submit monitoring 
reports," she said. "They have not re- 
sponded, nor have they asked for an ex- 
tension." 

City geologist Cherie D'Andrea, who 
has been handling the 24th Street case, 
also was critical. "The only report I have 
on file from them [the gas station] is 
dated Feb. 10, 1992." she said. "They're 
not doing things in a timely manner." 

D'Andrea was surprised to learn that 



Rosemont and McCarthy had spent over 
$90,000. "That's a lot of money for what 
they've accomplished " 

She questioned the fact that Gen-Tech 
had only put in two underground water- 
monitoring wells. "They've done a lot of 
boring. But as long as they had the drill- 
ing equipment out and ready to go, they 
could have converted those bores into 
wells." 

Solomon explained that the boring Gen- 
Tech did in the McGowans' yard was 
done by hand to test the soil, and that the 
equipment used to dig a well was too 
cumbersome to get into the yard. 

The McGowan property begins after a 
5-foot drop-off behind the station, so the 
fence will have to be removed and a plank 
installed to wheel down a specialty drill- 
ing rig, he said. 

Solomon also said that he had just re- 
cently replied to the city's 10-point letter 
with a FAX answering all its questions. 
The official document was to be mailed 
soon. 

He also believes that many people in- 
volved in the process have unrealistic ex- 
pectations about how fast a cleanup of 
this nature can be completed. 

"It is not something you can wave a 
wand and have done with," said Sol- 
omon. "It will probably take several 
years. To treat the ground water with our 
Pump-and-Treat system will probably 
take a minimum of five years, and it could 
take as many as 10." 

As for contamination in the McGow- 
ans' yard, Solomon said he had seen no 
proof that it existed at dangerous levels. 
"The reason we have shown no urgency 
in reacting to the McGowans' concerns is 
that the amount of hydrocarbons in their 
back yard is not of a toxic amount," he 
said. 

"We sent a tree expert out to inspect 
their redwood, and he said that it had not 
been affected in any way by the leak, and 
that it was leaning due to natural causes," 
Solomon added. 

The contamination found in the Mc- 
Gowans' soil was at a depth of 5 feet, he 
said, which is too close to the surface to 
be caused by the underground tank. 

"The oil in their yard was probably 
caused by rain washing oil from the sta- 
tion down to their property," said Solomon. 
"And what we did find was 350 parts per 
million. Below 1,000 parts per million is 
considered permissible." 

McGowan disputes that any level of 
pollution from the station is permissible. 
"If it were merely dog-doo they dropped 
in our yard, I would expect them to come 
clean it up," she said. 

Not only is she concerned about her 
family's health, she said, but she and her 
husband are currently trying to refinance 
their house, and now they're afraid that 
won't be possible. "The only thing we 
have in the world is this Noe Valley Vic- 
torian. It's a fixer-upper. The land it sits 
on is everything, but now it might not be 
worth anything." 

Nevertheless, McGowan is sympathetic 
to Rosemont and McCarthy's situation. 
"Poor Wayne, he's screwed," she said. 
"He's sweating out his future. This is a 
problem he has to face, but it dates back 
to the days of old." 

Rosemont and McGowan met for the 
first time at a Sept. 4 meeting called by 
the city for all parties involved. McGow- 
an said the meeting was somewhat con- 
frontational, but that she left with some 
• of the answers she had been waiting six 
months for. 

"Since that meeting, it looks like 
things are finally starting to buzz." □ 



Tax Preparation 
Bookkeeping 



Office Management 
Consulting 



Dennis Warren, E.A. 
Bookkeeping Services 



Corporations, Partnerships, Individuals 

Accounts Payable 4 1 5 /759-8678 Pa / ro// 

Accounts Receivable General Ledger 




Elisa Ining, owner of the 1st Ihing Lounge, is perfecting her witeh's cackle for this year's 
Halloween festivities on 24th Street. PHOTO BY TOM WACHS. 

Don't Be Scared to Trick-or-Treat 



Continued from l\ige I 

us to a pre-Halloween glimpse of part of 
her costume: a pierced navel. 

The personnel at Bakers of Paris,' on 
24th near Noe, will chip in to buy candy 
for kids. '"It's been a tradition lor the em- 
ployees to do this for the last few years." 
said counterperson Molly Mancwal. 

Bell Market, across the street, will fea- 
ture checkers in costume and goodies for 
trick-or-treaters. And the nearby Real 
Food Company will offer treats made 
with alternative sweeteners, for those 
who are overly health- and/or tooth- 
conscious. 

Don't miss the Courtyard Cafe at 3913 
24th St Owner Davood Mozafari guar- 
antees that "we will be here as we have 
been for the past 10. years with treats for 
our future customers." Mozafari then 
filled us in on Char-Shambu Sun. a holi- 



day celebrated in his native Iran that 
bears a strong similarity to Halloween. 

(The Char-Shambu Suri holiday takes 
place on the Wednesday before the Iran- 
ian New Year, and begins with the build- 
ing of small bonfires that people leap 
over. Mozafari said. Then all the young 
boys and girls go out trick-or-treating — 
the boys dressed as girls. At sundown, 
you make a wish and stand on the street 
corner listening for the first word in the 
conversation of a passerby. That word 
indicates whether the wish will come 
true, Mozafari explained.) 

Before you make a wish this Hallow- 
een, stop by the First Ining Lounge at 
4026 24th St. 

Every year owner Elisa Ining dresses 
up in outrageous costume and passes out 
candy in front of her establishment, 
laughing all the while. She doesn't know 
what she'll be wearing yet, but she's got 
the laugh down pat. □ 



Yuet 



Lee 



CHINESE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 

Original Chinese Delicacies 
at Affordable Prices 
Friendly Service 

One of the Best Chinese Restaurants in San Francisco 

— The San Francisco Bay Area Menu 



FREE DELIVERY 
(415) 550-8998 



5 pm-9 pm (cash only for delivery) 

3601 26th Street San Francisco CA 94110 

Hours: Monday-Thursday 11 am-10 pm 
Friday and Saturday 11 am-U pm 
Sunday 4 pm-10 pm 

Closed Tuesday 



Page 6 



The Noe Valley Voice • October 1992 




4045 24th St. (between Noe & Castro): 648-8660 • Pharmacy: 648-8662 



■lid 



WflK COMPUTERIZED 
OUR PHARMACIES TO BRING I 
YOU EVEN FASTER 
AND BETTER SERVICE 

• MAINTAINS COMPirtf PATIENT PROFILES 

• ALERTS THE PHARMACIST TO ANY 
DRUG INTERACTION 

• RECALLS YOUR SPECIAL REOUCSTS SUCH 
AS USY OPEN CONTAINERS' 

• (ASTIR SERVICE EOR NEW AND 
REFILL PRESCRIPTIONS 

• ALERTS THE PHARMACIST TO RECORDED 
ALLERGIES TO PREVENT A LLERGIC REACTIONS 
TO MEDICATIONS 

• RETRIEVES PRESCRIPTIONS IY NAME 

• COMPLETE RECORDS FOR INSURANCE 
AND INCOME TAX PURPOSES 

' PROVIDES DUPLICATE RECEIPTS FOR 
PERSONAL RILLING NEEDED UPON REQUEST 



Your Thrifty JR. offers you: 

Convenience • Full Prescription Service 
Health & Beauty Aids 
Photo Film & Film Processing • Cosmetics 
Greeting Cards for All Occasions 
Beer, Wine and Distilled Spirits 

WE NOW SELL MUNI FAST PASSES 
Thrifty JR. is proud to be a part of your community. 



PHARMACISTS TAKE PRIDE 
IN PROVIDING THE BEST 
PROFESSIONAL PRESCRIPTION SERVICE 



L'OREAL 

SOFT EFFECTS' 




$4 



50 



Ultra-light. 
Ultra-natural 
and Ultra- 
lasting eye 
color in many 
fashion 
shades. 



Check out this great regularly-priced 
value at your Noe Valley Thrifty Jr.! 



CLAIROL 

LOVING CARE 




E S5 1 



Hair color 
lotion 
Assorted 
shades. 



Check out this great regularly-priced 
value at your Noe Valley Thrifty Jr 1 



THRIFTY 

HYDROCORTISONE 1% 

$3^ 




1-oz cream or 
ointment. 
COMPARE 
TO CORTAID. 



Check out this great regularly-priced 
value at your Noe Valley Thrifty Jr.! 



KERI LOTION 



$7^ 



EA. 



15-oz Assorted 
formulas for dry 
skin care 




Check out this great regularly-priced 
value at your Noe Valley Thrifty Jr.! 



THRIFTY 

ASPIRIN 

S3 49 



250 count 5 gram 
COMPARE 
TO NATIONAL 
BRANDS. 




Check out this great regularly-priced 
value at your Noe Valley Thrifty Jr.! 



KODAK GOLD 

PLUS FILM 



THRIFTY 

MOUTHWASH 



DRY IDEA 

DEODORANT 



$4 



39 



35mm 
24 exposure 
200 I S O 




$4 



49 



48-oz Amber 
COMPARE TO 
LISTERINE. 



$2 



89 




PEDIATRIC 

COUGH FORMULA 

$3^ 



Check out this great regularly-priced 
value at your Noe Valley Thrifty Jr ! 



Check out this great regularly-priced 
value at your Noe Valley Thrifty Jr 1 



4-oz aerosol 
or 1 75-oz 
solid, Powder 
Fresh formula 
or 1.5-oz 
roll-on, 
assorted 
formulas 



Check out this great regularly-priced 
value at your Noe Valley Thrifty Jr 1 



4-oz. 44, 44m. 
44d or 44e 
Formulated 
especially for 
children 




Check out this great regularly-priced 
value at your Noe Valley Thrifty Jr ! 



H 



LOTTERY 4y4| i*»i« *' 

^mmZ mMmtmm CAllfORNIft TMBIFTT 
TICKETS DRUGSTORE! 




Hours: 9-9 Mon- Sat, 10-7 Sun 
Pharmacy Hours: 9-7 Mon-Fri, 10-6 Sat 
Pharmacy closed Sunday 




your health partner for OVER 60 YEARS 



Supervisor 
Still Looking 
For Leadership 
From Mayor's 
Office 

Continued from Page I 
in the Clinton campaign. 

Voice: There are so many important 
issues facing San Francisco. In your 
opinion, what are the biggest priorities? 

Achtenberg: Management is the biggest 
issue that faces the city right now. Our 
fiscal problems are so severe, and San 
Francisco citizens have very high expec- 
tations when it comes to what the city 
needs to deliver. We have to figure out a 
way to somehow deliver the high quality 
of service citizens expect. 

The truth is, though, we're faced with 
a dwindling tax base — and there are 
many causes for that, stemming all the 
way back to Prop. 13 and the fallacies 
surrounding the allotment of government 
responsibility. 

Local governments have a tremendous 
amount of responsibility, but they're at 
the mercy of the state when it comes to 
amassing the resources necessary to pay 
for the things they're mandated to do. So 
we have this inherent contradiction, which, 
quite frankly, is only now coming home 
to roost — whether it's in the deteriora- 
tion of our schools or in the eroding of 
government's infrastructure. And we're 
seeing all of those things happen all at 
once. 

At the same time, we're experiencing 
this incredibly deep recession. And gov- 
ernment is failing, in that people feel 
alienated and skeptical about whether it 
can achieve its mandate. 

Voice: So do you believe there is a way 
out of the turmoil? 

Achtenberg: Well, some people have 
suggested that cities as political entities 
are obsolete, but I'm not at the point yet. 
We perform a very important function as 
a local government. We're closest to the 
people — with everything that's good 
about that and everything that's bad about 
that. 

We can't afford to not have both local 
government and state government. What 
we have to do is figure out how to pay for 
government in some way that makes 
sense. Now, part of the problem is that 
the federal government has bailed out on 
helping to finance the operation of the 
state, and correspondingly the state has 
bailed out on its obligation to help finance 
the delivery of services at the local level. 
I think we need to see a realignment of 
those priorities. 

Additionally, I believe — and this is not 
a popular thing to say — that people are 
going to have to come to grips with the 




■\00BG 



Member 
Bwrf of Supervisors 



§11 




San Francisco Supervisor Roberta Achtenberg made history this summer when she became the 
first out -front lesbian to address the Democratic Party Convention. PHOTO BY TOM wac lis 



fact that once we've extracted every effi- 
ciency we can extract, if they want the 
services, they're going to have to pay for 
them. 

I'm not saying we should tax ourselves 
into oblivion. There's nothing wrong with 
wanting to be better managers and make 
things more efficient and all of that — and 
I think we've only scratched the surface 
regarding the ways in which we can reor- 
ganize and make government more efficient. 

But in the end. we don't produce wid- 
gets That's just not what we do. When 
you have an unprofitable subsidiary in 
business, you cut it off. You close it. 
Here, when the economy declines, more 
people, not less people, come to the De- 
partment of Social Services, so we're al- 
ways in the position of having to spend 
more when we have less. And we can't 
close the unprofitable subsidiary. 

Government cannot be run like a busi- 
ness because the two are fundamentally 
different — which is not to say we 
shouldn't be efficient and streamline 
policies and financial management mech- 
anisms. Still, at some point, these things 
are not going to help us bridge the gap 
between our income and our demand. 

What we're going to have to do is fig- 
ure out how to be as cost-conscious as 
we can, and then we have to figure out 
how to persuade people that beyond that 
point, we have to pay for what we need. 

Voice: What is your view of Mayor Jor- 
dan's administration? Do you have 
confidence in Jordan and his team to 
get the job done? 

Achtenberg: We've always wished May- 
or Jordan well. We know that it takes any 
administration a certain amount of time 
to figure out how to do the job. I'd say 
it's taken this administration a good bit 
longer than many would have predicted. 
Whether or not they'll ever get the job 
down, I don't really know. 

In the beginning, we had a much more 



Cotton Basics 

Basic Clothes at Basic Prices 




Cotton Basics 

1301 Castro Street, SF 
(415) 550-8646 



100% Cotton Pre-Shrunk 

Hours: 10:00 to 7:00 Mon.-Sat. 
11:00 to 6:00 Sunday 



charitable attitude than we do now. I wish 

I was confident that the kind of planning 
which needs to be going on there is in- 
deed going on and that they're not just 
moving from crisis to crisis, but quite 
frankly I can't really point to anything 
that tells me that's the case. 

The budget that the mayor sent to the 
Board of Supervisors was pathetic, basi- 
cally. They asserted that it was lean and 
trim and blah, blah, blah. It turned out 
that there were holes everywhere, and 
basically they turned it over to us to do 
what needed to be done to shore the whole 
thing up. 

This government was not designed to 
be led by the Board of Supervisors. We're 

I I people. This is thought of as a part- 
time job. The way our powers are allo- 
cated, the mayor produces the budget, 
the mayor initiates all funding requests, 
and we pass on those things. 

We can cut things from the budget, but 
we can't add anything to it. etc., etc. 
We're designed to be a reactive body, a 
body that is there to curb the excesses pi 
the mayor's office — and one that con- 
templates leadership in the mayor's of- 
fice — but so far that hasn't happened. 

Voice: Now that California has a bud- 
get, what sort of cuts are in store for 
San Francisco? 

Achtenberg: We have a $64 million gap 
(prior to the mayor's discovery of certain 
budgetary windfalls in mid-September) 
that needs to be filled. The mayor is pro- 
posing budget cuts, and the rumor is that 
the cuts will be primarily in the Depart- 
ment of Public Health and Muni service. 

My own view of this is that we should 
cut those two entities last, since those 
two entities took the lion's share of cuts 
in the first round. 

I also think that we have to look at 
additional revenues, which the mayor has 
said we're not going to do. Again, I'm 
not saying that I'm overly enthusiastic 



about tax increases in such a severe re- 
cession. However, we must proceed on 
this rapidly. The longer we take, the short- 
er amount of time there is to extract sav- 
ings. Now, we only have 10 months to 
make up the $64 million. If we only have 
W2 months, all that means is that the cuts 
have to be more dramatic to make up the 
same $64 million in a shorter period of 
time. 

I'm hoping that in this budget go-round, 
the mayor will actually decide on some 
priorities. By that I mean that he recog- 
nizes that he's making policy by virtue of 
what he cuts and what he keeps intact. 

My own view is that there are certain 
things that should be priorities. I think 
libraries are one. Public health is anoth- 
er. Even if we could restore money that 
we take from public health this year in 
next year's budget, there would still be 
irreparable harm done to numerous peo- 
ple this year. So. I think you have to take 
that into account when you decide to cut 
public health first. 

For libraries, it s the same kind of 
thing Now. I'm not saying that we shouldn't 
do street paving. I think we should do 
street paving, but if we lengthen the 
amount of time we wait to pave a particu- 
lar street as a way of paying for some- 
thing in the interim, then I might actually 
be for that — not because I don't think 
street paving is important, but because I 
know that if we wait an extra 10 months 
to pave or repave a street — while it would 
be a modest inconvenience — nobody is 
going to become infected with HIV as a 
result, no child is going to go to school 
and be exposed to tuberculosis because 
he or she was not inoculated, and so on. 

Voice: Are you or the board involved 
in helping out the city's public schools 
in any way? 

Achtenberg: We don't govern the public 
schools, but I've been trying to make the 
relationship between the Board of Super- 
visors and the school board as coopera- 
tive as we can make it. We've helped out. 
for example, in terms of providing a lot 
of services that help subsidize the San 
Francisco Unified School District. We 
provide buses and recreation leaders and 
all kinds of things that other cities don't 
provide their school districts. Even 
though the school board is a separate 
entity, we think our missions are so inter- 
related that we can't afford to allow the 
schools to deteriorate. These children are 
San Francisco citizens too. 

Last year we took a stand when the 
governor wanted to suspend Prop ^8. In 
fact, San Francisco was the only county 
that stood up and said no. we won't allow 
welfare and the schools to be pitted 
against each other, which is basically 
what they're succeeding in doing this 
year. Last year we led the fight to say no 
and it stuck for a year at least. 

We also have the sports tax that we 
instituted on professional football and 
baseball teams, which we use to fund the 
sports programs for the schools. 

Continued on Page 9 



(Salhen (Slate Huys (Uljntr anb Ikllringgrs 



'Building 'Bridges of Understanding for 'Bay Area youth Through Music 



Touring 



Music 
Camp 



Singing 



The Golden Gate Boys Choir and 
Bellringers is currently holding 
auditions for boys 7 and older 
with unchanged voices. Call 
the choir office today for an 
information packet and audition 
appointment (510) 887-4311. 



Friends 



Music 
Theory 



Performing 



Auditions in San Francisco are held at 
St. Mary's Cathedral, 1111 Gough Street 

480 Larcftmont Street, tfayivard, California, 94544 



CHURCH STREET NEI G H B O R S 




THE 






ONE STOP 
PARTY SHOP 



presents 

Halloween 1992 

Come Join Us for a Monstrous Good Time 

Blood-curdling Masks • Spooktacular Make-up 
Fantastic Costumes featuring Batman and Catwoman 
Helium Balloons (Deliveries too') 

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO MAKE 
YOUR GHOULISH NIGHT COMPLETE! 

Free Trick or Treat Bag 

with a $15. or more purchase 

Hours: 11 am - 7 pm Monday - Friday 

10 am - 7 pm Saturday and Sunday 

1600 Church Street at 28th 
824-0414 
Your "One Stop Party Shop! 



i 5 

mm 





A Sports Card Shop in Noe Valley! 




Football, Baseball, Hockey, Basketball 
Other Sports • Collectibles 
Vintage Wax Packs 

Always the Latest Cards in Stock! 




Old Sterling Jewelry, Vintage Costume Pieces 
Big Selection! 
Mexican Purses, Hawaiian Shirts 
Now Featuring Comic Books and Non-Sports 
Cards— Specializing in Marvel Cards 

Both Stores in One Location! 
1547 Church (at Duncan) 

Open Mon-Fri Noon-6, Sat 1 0-6 • 285-3668 



Now Open in Noe Valley 




RESTAURANT 

HUNAN AND MANDARIN STYLE 

Open for Lunch and Dinner * Serving a Full-range Chinese Menu 
Take-out Available ¥ We use no MSG 

Lunch entrees from $3.95 served with soup and rice 

Open for Lunch Monday - Saturday 11-3 

Serving Dinner Monday - Thursday 11-9:15 
Fnaay - Saturday 11-10 
Sunday 12 30-9:15 

1500 Church Street (at 27th) F 282-0919 




CERAMICS FOR INTERIOR DESIGN 

Decorative Accessories ■ Lighting 

294 29th St. (at Church) • San Francisco 
415/641-1590 • Open by appointment 

Please call to see stock items or order custom 



Lily of the Valley 



"Your Neighborhood Florist 



(4\5) 695-1456 

1515 Church Street 
at 27th Street 





Achtenberg 
Has High Hopes 
For Clinton/ 
Gore Ticket 

Continued/mm Page 7 

Voice: Speaking of sports teams, what's 
your view on the city's efforts to keep 
the Giants. Should this be a priority? 

Achtenherg: I think it's a priority. I think 
they're an important industry. Primarily, 
they're a money maker. I'm not talking 
about the profit the individual team mem- 
bers make, but from San Francisco's 
point of view, they're a major tenant at 
Candlestick Park. They have 1.000 peo- 
ple on their payroll. They pay a sports 
tax. They're relatively non-polluting. 
The Giants is a decent industry that we 
should try to keep in San Francisco with- 
in reason. We shouldn't pay any price to 
keep them here, but if we have to pay 
some price to keep them here it may be 
worth it. 

Cities across the country are doing all 
kinds of things like giving their teams tax 
breaks and suspending planning rules that 
we San Franciscans would never con- 
sider doing — and I'm not suggesting San 
Francisco consider it. But I do think that 
when we have an important, productive, 
non-polluting industry, we should take 
steps to try and keep them. 

The Giants have always been a good 
citizen, and they have the collateral ben- 
efit of being a self-esteem builder for the 
city. This is a world-class town with a 
major league ball club. I'm not saying it's 
worth tens of millions of city dollars to 
maintain that as our identity, but it has 
financial and psychological benefits. Giv- 
en that that's the case, I think we should 
take reasonable steps to keep them here. 

Voice: Are there any issues specific to 
Noe Valley that you're involved in? 
And given the budget crises and other 
problems facing the city, do you have 
am suggestions as to how Noe Valley 
residents might help out? 

Achtenberg: Well, you have the new Noe 
Valley Democratic Club, which had a 
very good turnout when I spoke in Au- 
gust. That was very heartening to me. 

In addition, Noe Valley has the highest 
voter turnout. The highest percentage of 
registered voters go out and vote of any 
neighborhood in San Francisco. We are 
also probably the most liberal in our vot- 
ing patterns, which I think is important 
for any candidate to take notice of. 

And while we're concerned about Noe 
Valley issues — like keeping the senior 
lunch program and our library preserved 
and protected, and making sure that po- 
lice protection on 24th Street is adequate 
and that our businesspeople are getting 
the kinds of services they're entitled to — 
I think the typical Noe Valley citizen has 
a very broad view of the needs of San 
Francisco and can always be counted on 
to recognize that even though we're not 
flooded with homeless people in our neigh- 
borhood, for example, we don't forget 
that we have an obligation to homeless 
people. 

That's how I like to think of who we 
are as neighborhood citizens — that we 




Studying, as opposed lo shuffling, the paperwork is one of the more daunting tasks for a city supervisor these days. So Roberta Achtenherg 
relies on help from legislative aide Alex Clemens (center), student intern Cory Black (left), and volunteer Ann McCoy. PHOTO BY TOM WACHS 



are global thinkers as well as local doers. 
I try to be involved when called upon. 

I think the libraries are very important. 
They're important to kids, they're impor- 
tant to elders, to people out of work trying 
to figure out how to make their way. They 
just provide an important public service. 
I've been a big advocate of the libraries 
this year and held a whole series of hear- 
ings on the big cutback the mayor asked 
the library to take. And we were able to 
get the mayor to restore some money and 
then the Board of Supervisors, through 
political finagling, restored another 
$250,000 for the libraries. 



"People are going to 
have to come to grips with 
the fact that once we've 
extracted every efficiency we 
can extract, if they want 
the services, they're going 
to have to pay for them ." 



So we ended up minimizing their cut 
and also creating a situation where they 
could use their Prop. J money, which is 
the Children's Fund money, to do Sunday 
afternoon reading sessions and outreach 
to children. For instance, they're going to 
send out a whole set of bookmobiles, 
primarily to the outlying areas of the city 
and to housing projects to engender some 
enthusiasm about reading. 

It's a crazy thing to cut the libraries, 
you know. The mayor had us take a 10 
percent cut across the board for every 
department, which I think is a crazy way 
to make public policy. We have libraries 
in every community in this city, and they 
are some of the best investments you can 
make. Plus, the physical structures are 
already there, paid for a long time ago 
and filled with books. If anything, we 
should be investing more money in li- 



6 L * «> * I 




Third World Craft Center 



3900 
24th Street 
at 

Sanchez 
(415) 648-8068 



HAITIAN VODOUN BANNERS 
GUATEMALAN TEXTILES 
COCONUT MASKS 
SOAPSTONE CANDLE STICKS 
AFRICAN DRUMS 
FINE ART • JEWELRY 



Open 
M-Sat 
10:30 - 6:30 
Sun 

10:30 - 6pm 



Global Exchange is a non-profit alternative trade store working to 
build economic and social Justice from the bottom up 



braries. They're ready-made places for 
children to go safely after school. They 
instill the right kinds of values and right 
kinds of skills. 

Voice: You signed on very early as a 
supporter of Bill Clinton's presidential 
bid? What do you think his chances 
are at this point? 

Achtenberg: It looks pretty hopeful 
right now, but you can't take anything for 
granted. I don't want to be smug or com- 
placent about it because we have a lot of 
work to do. Not one vote has been cast 
yet, but he looks good today. It obviously 
didn't look anywhere near as hopeful 
when I first agreed to support Bill Clin- 
ton, but he was my choice from the start. 
I think he's a very intelligent, compas- 
sionate, and practical person. On a per- 
sonal level. I like him very much. 1 think 
he's very open-minded and pragmatic. I 
think he would be an excellent president, 
and I hope it happens. 

Voice: Do you think the issue of Clin- 
ton's avoiding the draft is going to have 
any impact? 

Achtenberg: I think the Bush campaign 
is trying for any distraction. They tried 
with the "women should respect their 
essential natures" thing, and that didn't 
go over too well. And they tried "bury 
the gays," which I think had as much 
downside as it did upside and made them 
look pretty ugly. 

Now, I think they're going to go back 
to "Bill didn't fight in a war and maybe 
he had sex outside his marriage." Who 
knows what's next. It's an effort, I think, 
for Bush to not have to talk about his 
record. 

Does the draft thing hurt Bill? Sure, 
with the group of folks who basically 
can't conceive of a commander in chief 
who was never a soldier. But 1 would say 
that's probably the same group who could 
never see a woman president. And then 
there is the nostalgia factor of wanting 
our president to have served. Clearly, 



Clinton is not going to get these people's 
vote. 

But for all of the rest of us who think 
there are other things that are at least of 
equal importance if not greater signifi- 
cance, we should listen to what Clinton 
has to say. 

Now, in my opinion, some of the state- 
ments he's made recently have had some 
of that lawyerly nitpicking quality about 
them that I don't think people appreciate. 
I have encouraged the campaign to be as 
forthright as they can be. 

Obviously, he did what he could to get 
out of the draft. He was a young, tal- 
ented, idealistic guy who disagreed with 
the war and wanted to go to Oxford. I 
have to tell you. I'm exactly Bill Clinton's 
age, and everybody I know who was in 
that situation tried to do that. If they 
were lucky, they succeeded. And if they 
were less lucky, they went to Vietnam. 
That's the way it was — and anybody who 
pretends it was different is just lying. 

But I think Clinton needs to be forth- 
right about it and not make these half 
statements. I think those kinds of state- 
ments are what will end up hurting him. 
Technically, they're true, but it ends up 
looking like he thinks he has something 
to hide, and I don't think he has anything 
to hide. 

Voice: What was your reaction to Pat 
Buchanan's mention of you in his speech 
at the Republican National Convention? 

Achtenberg: I believe he called me a 
homosexual extremist who the Democrats 
allowed to speak from the platform. Part 
of me was thrilled to have rated grouping 
with Hillary and Bill. And part of me 
was scared. 

I don't care what anybody says. We 
can laugh about Pat Buchanan all we 
want. He's a right-wing lunatic, and he 
represents the lunatic fringe. But there's 
a lot of violence in this society that talk 
like Buchanan's gives permission to. His 

Continued on Page 10 




Page 10 



The Noe Valley Voic e • October 1992 



Supervisor 
Achtenberg 

Continued from Page 9 

speech made me seared, for myself and 
my family. 

I'm a public figure. I'm a lightning rod 
for these kinds of things. I know that. 
Harry Britt. Carole Migden. and I all 
know who proceeded us: Harvey Milk. 



So when I'm filled with bluster, I say. 
'Oh. great. I was trashed by Pat Buchan- 
an. That makes me feel like I must be 
doing something right.' 

But it would be a lie to say that I wasn't 
struck with a little bit of fear because I 
know how powerful hate can be. and I 
know how statements like his give per- 
mission to people who are unbalanced to 
somehow think they can treat people like 
objects. And I don't want to see that hap- 
pen to any person, woman or man. gay 
or straight 



Voice: Do you have political aspirations 
beyond the Board of Supervisors? State 
or national office, ma>be? 

Achtenberg: Well, I'm interested in pub- 
lic service. I like what I do. I'm trying to 
do it well, and I think the more experi- 
ence I have, the better at it I am. It would 
be disinuenuous to say that if Bill Clinton 
said to me we need you. that I would not 
consider what he had to say. But I'm not 
considering that particularly likely. I try 



to be realistic about where I fit into the 
scheme of things. 

We have term limits on the Board of 
Supervisors. If the question is. would I 
consider other office at the conclusion of 
my tenure here, the answer is yes. I would 
consider it. 

I like doing this work, but I know how 
to do a lot of other kinds of work, too, so 
I don't feel like electoral office or politics 
is the only thing I know how to do. I 
would like to stay involved, but It's noi 
my life. □ 



CHURCH STREET NEIGHBORS 



ROBERT E. NEGER, M.D. 




Immunodeficiency 
Eye Disorders 

BOARD CERTIFIED 
CATARACT SPECIALIST 

• Glaucoma 

• Diabetic Treatment 

• Laser Surgery 

• Medicare Provider 

New Location- 
Corner of 25th Street 

1301 Church St. 

647-7730 




HUNGRY JOE'S 

FOOD TO GO 

BREAKFAST SERVED ALL DAY! 



Our new weekend special— Eggs Benedict, Eggs Blackstone & Eggs Florentino 
Our special during weekdays— 2 eggs & homemade fries $2.15 

Try our Fruit Pancakes and Waffles • Omelettes are our Speciality 
1748 Church St. (at Day) 282-7333 
Mon -Fri. 6:30-2:00 p.m. Sat. 7:30-2:00 p.m. Sun. 8:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. 




Integral 
Counseling 
Center 

of the 

California Institute of Integral Studies 

• Counseling for individuals 

• Couples and families 

• Group Therapy 

Phone 648-2644 1782 Church St. 




RONALD V. EVANS 

Certified Public Accountant 

Income Tax 
Tax Planning 
Accounting & Bookkeeping Services 

Year-Round 

282-2838 



1679 Church Street 

(Across from St. Paul's Church) 




HOMES OF CHARM 

decorator's JVAtQuE 

Twenty-five years 
in Noe Valley 
Large assortment of Victorian 
hardware, chandeliers, original 
& reproductions, oak & pine 
furniture, country kitchen, 
old tools and the unusual. 



Open Tues - Sun 
1544 Church 



12:00 - 6:00 
647-4586 



Noe's Grill 

is Now Serving Brunch 

7 Days a Week 



BREAKFAST A. BRUNC H 

Served Moo Fn lan to I 2pm 
Sa A sur vim i 2pm 



BniflflMBiLmu 



With 

ham. fc— | nangi or t aaaallaa I 
«rw< harltuuk 



ON nit NIDI 



» to. freak rrwad ehaek pair? 
( or. Hrm Yarh atrip 



Italian Nauaf* 

CiuuHlmi _ 
f e.ra*d (Wf llaafc 



-U.IS 



S7M 



omun o* mm laaBM *™ 

« la> ammhlad ar MM 
4ww^m- chwtc, t/Ou/wUwwtmf i 
uuafc ham. ipu«md heel 1 4 
muafaroom ouoo. avocado, pea popper garb. 
BBKh. tnmak,. artichoke hemu. pcao, 
Ma cream vhwan iack cnrdcW Aamoa 
Sana htW. nozzvtikv fetal 

MHUHKI ifc 

> » OOV 1 haturnUlh or I taeMnl paacnhm 
A raain •( (aaaallaa kaeaa. ham. aaaaa«r 



TAM AKIN B.TrtltMllJt ~ ■■nn>i 1 . M 



Oael n 



Ham« Stria Palaloo 

HaakBrwa. 

Tom ar FafUah Madia 
Frail 



SIM 
-IU5 



-11 7S 
-SIJO 
-11.00 
SIM 



HIWK .,1. is 



Cat* - DM Cat* - Sprite _ 
< allalofn; aaasitMt flavor* . 

Crmaherrv *■»«» 

Aapkt Ormagi Me* 

HUk rrp, ar aaa>-fal 

lead Tea 

lea 



SIMlM.fr.tn/IUl 
-J1J 



L.HJJ I, M -• 
'.I M I. tl M 

SIM hi, II JO 

SIM 

Utt 



SM 



»«B Slack (>/ _ 
tkariKarhfJ* . 



_M.«S 



ww Mr. aa*»m» wwmU team ../Tr. 

GKOUND toll Til 



•*A>HJOt>rTU_N<>ITOA^c T 

'<Tf* »a» Arak/kakraahfll If 

MMaiaai 



ECU BUflMTT «wM r tz < 

wmffm it Holla**,,* mc, _ 

"~"* fl—tBiOJI gjftrjPM 

f .tr/uli wmff,* ,« //oUaraar.i. mmm, _ 



< aa.pa, 
Mlmaaa 



1 Spill 



SIM 



art mmm mnwr/m aw M 
I djaii, «J,. aaaaajj 



-MJO 



1 UK ItrN III . II 11 tMRI .1 „ w* XBa .h omK 

«i//W.iu.kea (.raaul JLujcIiiA wmtflH. 

,1 a».Viu'i> ... •«..■»/ U.vj 




.'°'.*. UJVrjl f*W toll DAll t iftUAJJ 



Located at the Corner of 
24th & Church streets 

695-2949 



--■■ilium 1 ■ - 



GET 12 FREE 
RENTALS WHEN 
YOU PRE-BUY 

Beauty & the Beast 

OR 

Batman 





OCTOBER 19, 1992 
FOR ONLY 

$19.95 





1735 Noriega St. 
731-0707 



1900 Lombard St. 
563-8210 



All the Hits from Aliens to Zulu 



Hum 




SHORT TAKES 



undertaker, for he wil 


be the last to let 




you down. 


□ 


Schools Whitewashed 



Latino Health Fair 



Some of San Francisco 's finest guys and 
ghouls will be on hand to escort kids through 
the haunted house at the Upper Noe 
Recreation Center Oct. 30. 

PHOTO BY KEVIN BLACK 



Time for Scarehouse VIII 

The neighborhood should be frightful- 
ly pleased to be invited to Noe Valley's 
eighth annual "Scarehouse" on Friday, 
Oct. 30, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. (Note that 
this is the day before Halloween, a 
change from previous years.) 

The chills and thrills will take place 
within the ghostly halls of the Upper Noe 
Recreation Center, located at the corner 
of Day and Sanchez streets. Admission 
is $2 for kids 13 and older, and $1 for the 
younger ones (7 and up). 

The Scarehouse is sponsored by the San 
Francisco Recreation and Park Depart- 
ment, but ghoulish volunteers are needed 
to help set the scene during the week of 
Oct. 26. or to work a monster shift Oct. 30. 

For more blood and guts, call Kevin 
Black (aka Dr. Caligari Nosferatu) at 
695-5011 between noon and 5 p.m. And 
remember, says Black, be kind to your 



"The Latino HIV/AIDS & Health Fair" 
will take place at Dolores Park on Satur- 
day. Oct. 24. from noon to 5 p.m. 

Approximately 25 tables and booths 
will be set up to disseminate information 
on AIDS education and prevention, and 
community artists will offer live music 
and performances, in addition to games 
and other activities. 

A special volunteers meeting has been 
scheduled for Friday, Oct. 2, from 6 to 8 
p.m. at the American Red Cross Mission 
Service Center, 810 Valencia St.. at 19th 
(phone: 206-7937). Also, general plan- 
ning meetings are being held on Mon- 
days, from 4 to 6 p.m. , at the Center for 
Positive Care, 3180 18th St. (phone: 621- 
1361 or 648-3702). 

The fair is sponsored by several grass- 
roots organizations, including Aguilas, 
Curas, Llego, the Mission Neighborhood 
Health Center, the American Red Cross 
Mission Service Center, the San Francisco 
AIDS Foundation, and the U.C.S.F. AIDS 
Health Project/Multicultural Unit. 

If you would like to give a donation, 
mail it to Latino Health Fair, c/o Aguilas, 
P.O. Box 40771, S.F, CA 94140. □ 



The weekend of Saturday and Sunday. 
Oct 3 and 4. is slated to be one of the 
biggest "paint-ins" in San Francisco his- 
tory, when the interiors of over 100 San 
Francisco public schools — approximate- 
ly 1.5 million square feet of classrooms, 
hallways, cafeterias, and libraries (the 
equivalent of painting Coit Tower 53 
times) — will be painted by volunteers. 

The project, officially called Honor 
Roll '92. is being organized by the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce, with 
the support of the San Francisco Unified 
School District and Painters Union Local 4. 

Kelly-Moore Paint Co. of San Carlos 
will donate 5,000 gallons of paint, from 
stock damaged in the Loma Prieta Earth- 
quake. Instead of repackaging the paint 
for sale, the company has created a color 
called "Earthquake White," to be used 
exclusively in San Francisco schools. 

Last month, Edison Elementary in 
Noe Valley was the site for a formal an- 
nouncement of the project. And during 
the ceremonies. Mayor Frank Jordan, 
School Superintendent Bill Rojas, and 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
President Donald Doyle painted a wall of 
the school's cafeteria. 

"We are mainly concentrating on get- 



concentr-Tt 

itte cow*" 

IHONffi fjjOb 





'only the best' 



Fancy Bakery, Bagel Factory, 
Restaurant and Deli 

Custom catering is our specialty 
Fresh Breads Baked Daily! 

3872A 24th St. 647-3334 
1206 Masonic at Haight 626-9111 
3218 Fillmore 922-1955 

Now in Mill Valley 

308 Strawberry Village Center 381 -2600 



Edison Elementary students {from left) Luis 
Alvulos. Luc Alvalos. Pedro Perez. Massiel 
Perez. Maura McGowan. and Emily 
McGowan joined San Francisco School 
Superintendent Bill Rojas. Chamber of 
Commerce President Donald Doyle, and 
Joseph Crist iano. of Kelly- Moore Paint Co.. 
in kicking off a volunteer "paint-in" of San 
Francisco schools Oct. 3-4. 
PHOTO BY EDWARD KLAMM 

ting the hallways done," said Graciela 
Spreitz, Edison's principal. "The hall- 
ways are the place that all the kids enjoy, 
and our biggest hope is simply to beauti- 
fy the school." 

Other participating schools in Noe Val- 
ley include James Lick Middle School, 
the Kate Kennedy Children's Center, and 
Rooftop, Alvarado, and Douglass ele- 
mentary schools. 

Besides painting, volunteers will pitch 
in and clean up the schools, doing every- 
thing from gardening and landscaping to 
cleaning the bleachers. Professional 
painters from Local 4 will supervise each 
school's painting operation. 

Continued on Page 13 




A very warm welcome to 
our Noe Valley neighbors. 

We'd like to welcome our friends in Noe Valley to the 
Bank of America "family." We're proud to have been 
part of your community since 1927, and look forward 
to meeting even more of you in the months ahead. 

Please drop by from October 3 1 st to November 7th 
to meet Branch Manager Daveine Pasdera, 
Customer Service Manager Margo Mendoza, 
and the entire staff for refreshments, 
and to learn how we can serve you better. 



Noe Valley Branch 
4096 24th Street 
622-4301 



m 



Bank of America 



Bank ot America NT&SA- Member FDIC 



BURRITOS • TACOS • ENCHILADAS 



Z 

u 

— « 

X 

>• 

CJ 
El 



O 

o 
< 

H 

«8 

o 

H 

5 

=> 

CO 

Z 
< 

< 

H 
U 

O 
u 
> 




TAQUERIA 



Serving 

Fresh • Fast • Fantastic 

MEXICAN FOOD 



In the Heart of 

NOE VALLEY 



Open Everyday 1 1 am - 10 pm 
3917 24th Street at Sanchez • 648-0477 



n 
x 

m 

73 

m 
r* 
r- 

m 
z 
O 



DO 
73 

o 
z 

73 

n 
x 

o 

r- 

m 

X 

m 

H 

o 

g 

> 

C/5 



3IV31S • VDS3HJ VflOV • SNV3S MDVlfl 



TOP OF 24TH STREET 



( ThefWrndCompam^V /v 


Pets for your enjoyment, 




supplies for their needs 




647-8755 




Easy Parking • VISA • MasterCard 




4298 24th Street at Douglass 




San Francisco, CA 94114 





B 



Now Open in Noe Valley 

A R N E Y 

Gourmet Hamburgers 



S 



Specializing in Gourmet Hamburgers, Chicken & Salads 

Voted "Best Hamburger" in the East Bay 1990 & 1991 
by East Bay Express 

Enjoy Dining on Our Sunny Patio 

Open 7 Days for Lunch and Dinner 
Sunday-Thursday 11 am-9:30 pm 
Friday and Saturday 11 am-10:30 pm 

4138 24th St. (near Castro) 282-7770 
Also in the Marina: 3344 Steiner (at Chestnut) 



* 
♦ 




BJ.Droubi 
Real Estate 

We love 
Noe Valley! 



4128 24th St, 
550-1300 



B.J. Droubi 
Carol Bee 
Peter Brannigan 
Joel Bridgman 
Patricia Carapiet 
Clemens Classen 
Bill Downing 
Barbara Gullion 
Mark Holcombe 
Terry Lee 



Keith McCollom 
Peggy Mclntyre 
Stephen Moore 
Tom Norwick 
Elizabeth Scott 
Donna Sullivan 
Paul Tollefson 
William Tull 
Shirley Wygant 




HOMEMADE 
ITALIAN AND GOURMET DISHES 
Take it home & just heat & eat 

) anomrno 

y o gourmet deli 

(415) 282-0081 
649 Diamond Street at Elizabeth 

Mon -Fn. 10-7 Sat. 10-4 Closed Sun. & Holidays 

Try our meatball or Italian sausage sandwiches! 
Party Trays and Gift Baskets 

We send Gift Baskets & Gourmet Food Items Anywhere 





General Dentistry 

Jor Adults and Children 

Cosmetic Dentistry 
Evening and Saturday Appointments 
Insurance Plans Welcomed 



Sylvia Jimenez Cox, D.D.S. Miriam Acosta, D.D.S 

4 1 62 24th Street 647-6000 





RISTORANTE 

ITALIAN CUISINE 

Open seven days 

20% OFF EARLY BIRD ENTREES 
Monday - Thursday 6:00 - 6:30 pm 
4109 24th Street • 821-1515 
San Francisco 94114 

Take-Out Orders Available 



POEM 



SHORT TAKES 



Back 
Neck 
Shoulder 



PAIN at Work? 



The View from 
Billy Goat Hill 



transforms a Wand sprawl 

into a tray 01 quaint horv d'ocm res. 



to hungry urban guerrillas, 
manages stress 

iike power, like water 
blood lines run beneath 
these inky streets. 

Ancestral voices bubble to the surface, 
yours is not the only broken lineage. 

yOUFS in not the onl\ soui 
sent wheeling over the Vailev 

from this rough chert perch. 



— Steve Bosque 



Continued from Pa$e fl 

For more information, or to donate 
lime or supplies, call the Sah Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, at 392-451 1, ex- 
tension X65. 



Treemania Goes South 



m 1 1 ni.* mee 



•heduted 
creation 



Randall Street resident Steve Bosque 
makes frequent in/>\ in Hill) Goal Hill 
i w here Castro meets 30th Street), 

accompanied by his dog Mi ster 



Quit Smoking in One Session 

Jonathan D. Gray • Hypnosis 
San Francisco • (415) 563-2333 



Addictions • Stress Reduction 
Pain Control • Weight Control 
Phobias • Optimum Performance 



So far. over 100 people have signed up 
tor plantings in October and November. 
For more details, contact Sue Bowie at 
824-1062. □ 

Alvarado After School 

A new after-school program for kin- 
dergarten, first-, jnd second-grade stu- 
dents at Alvarado Elementary School. 
625 Douglass St.. has opened its doors. 

The program Officially began opera- 
tion on Sept. 9. but is still taking applica- 
tions for the 1992-93 school year. First 
priority goes to students at Alvarado. but 
other families may apply and will be con- 
sidered on a space-available basis 

The program is being managed by West 
Portal C.A.R.E.. a licensed childcare 
program that has been at West Portal 
Elementary School since 19X2. West Por- 
tal C.A.R.E. is a private, non-profit cor- 
poration governed by a parent board of 
directors 

If you'd like to know about the pro- 
gram's philosophy or curriculum, call 

285-7756. □ 

Autumn Flea Market 

The Noe Valley Ministry's Annual 
Flea Market and Bake Sale, on Saturday. 
Oct. 10, says organizer Carol Maerzke, 
"'promises many outstanding bargains: 



household items, toys, great games, furni- 
ture, arts and crafts, fresh and delectable 
baked goods, beverages, and. of course, 
there is always the possibility of finding 
some hidden treasure. ' 



ilable tfirrJOghout the dav. The 
was begun two years ago w ith 

laer/kc add.v "the Hca market 



The Ministry is located at 1021 San- 
chez St.. between 23rd and 24th. and the 
event will run from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. . 
For details, call Maerzke at 239-8 129. C 

What's BEST for Kids 

The BEST Agenda i Bringing Educa- 
tion and Services Together So All Chil- 
dren Can Exceh invites the public to a 
conference and Board of Education can- 
didates forum on Oct. 10. 1992. at James 
Lick Middle School. 1220 Noe St., from 
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. (reception 5 to 6 
p.m. ) 

Morning workshops will locus on ex- 
ploring children's needs in the public- 
schools, and compiling questions lor can- 
didates and speakers. At noon. Superin- 
tendent Bill Rojas and Anthony Lincoln 
of the Mayor's Office for Children. 
Youth, and Families will address the con- 
ference and respond to questions shaped 
in the morning workshops. 

Other program speakers include Willie 
Brown, speaker of the State Assembly, 
and Dr. Shirley Thornton, deputy super- 
intendent of the California Department 
of Education. 

Admission to the conference is $15 to 
S25. on a sliding scale, youth free. No 
one. however, will be turned away for 
lack of funds. For more information and 
registration, contact Sheila Rhatigan. the 
BEST Agenda, 1535 Mission St., S.F.. 
CA 94103; 431-7430. □ 



MOVEMENT 
TO RELIEVE 




CLASSES 



Call Ann Ml 



Psychic 
Horizons 

Noe Valley Reading 
and Healing Fair 

Ask a Question and 

Discover Who You Are 

Sat. October 24 
Sat. November 28 
Sat. January 23 

2:00 to 4:00 pm 
Noe Valley Ministry 
or call 346-7906 




CHURCH OF NATURAL GRACE 



FREE HEALINGS! 



BOXED HOLIDAY CARD SALE 
During October 



SAVE 
THIS 
AD. 
NO 
LIMIT. 



9LTCIAY 


MOfCVAT 






TMUtSM 


rwrur 












31% ' 


30% 2 


29% 2 










OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


28% 4 


27% 5 


26%' 


25% 7 


24% ' 


23%' 


22%'° 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


ii 

21% 


20% U 


ii 

19% 


18%" 


IS 

17% 


ii 

16% 


17 

15% 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


ii 

14% 


it 

13% 


12%" 


ii 

11% 


10%° 


9% 


_ 14 

8% 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


OFF 


7% "i 


6%" 


5%" 


a 

4% 


» 

3% 1 


M 

2% 


)i 1 

1% 


OFF 1 


OFF 1 


OFF 


OFF 1 


OFF 1 


OFF 1 


OFF 1 



The Sooner You Buy, 
The More You Save! 

If you come in on Thursday, October 1st, you'll save 31% off all 
calendars.! Come in on Friday, October 2nd and save 30% off all 
calendars! And so on, and so on, and so on. . . 

JUST FOR FUN 

Cards and Gifts in Noe Valley 
3982 24th Street (between Noe & Sanchez) 285-4068 



BEADS • CARDS • MASKS • FINDINGS • JEWELRY PARTS • DO DADS 




XELA IMPORTS 

A Fun, Friendly Place 

to Buy Your 

Beads and Findings! 



CLOTHING AND DO DADS 
3961 1/2 24th St., SF 

(Opposite Bell Market Downstairs) 
Small Store 

282-6994 • Daily 10:30-7:30 



BEADS • CARDS • MASKS • FINDINGS • JEWELRY PARTS • DO DADS 



MASSAGE 

• Is nurturing to the body, mind and spirit. 

• Calms and soothes tension and stress. 

• Revitalizes physical and emotional fatigue. 

• Improves blood circulation and disperses edema. 

• Improves muscle tone and performance. 

• Prevents or separates muscular adhesions. 

• improves circulation and nutrition of joints to lesson inflammation and pain. 

NINA ALLEN, L.Ac., C.M.T. 

Has been a Massage Therapist since 1979. 
She is also an Acupuncturist and Herbalist specializing 
in the treatment of Insomnia and Injury. 
Nina practices many styles of massage with skill and caring. 

Weekend and Evening Hours • Insurance Accepted 

Please call (415) 285-6774 (Noe Valley) 
$10 OFF FIRST MASSAGE WITH THIS AD 



Page 14 



; ne we who 



J-Car Overrun 
By Teenagers 
On Church St. 

By Na jib Joe Hakim 

San Francisco police have arrested 
several of a group of teenagers who 
taunted passengers and vandalized a 
Muni J-car during rush hour on Friday. 
Aug. 21. 

According to Ingleside Officer Tom 
Heffernan, a group of around 20 juve- 
niles attacked the streetcar driven by 
Muni operator Gerald Bolden as it head- 
ed downtown from Church and 3()th at 
5:30 p.m. 

During a 10-minute interval, the car 
was forced to stop at Church and Valley 
streets, as a core group of youths — 
some of whom had been riding the train 
— jumped on and off. hurled racial epi- 
thets at the driver and passengers, broke 
two windows, and ripped a 3-foot-long 
switching iron out of the rear operator 
cabin, brandishing it as a weapon. One 
passenger said he'd been angrily threat- 
ened and called "faggot" in the incident . 




Within minutes of responding to the 
scene, Heffernan and Officer Ana Lee 
arrested four suspects who had fled to 
the corner of Dolores and 28th streets. 
The passengers and train operator later 
positively identified three of the youths, 
ranging in age from 14 to 17. 

Those three were cited for malicious 
mischief and for willfully causing a dis- 
turbance on a public transit system, and 
released to their families. Q 



Ingleside police officers Tom Heffernan and Ana Lee interviewed witnesses following the Aug. 
21 attack by teenagers on a J -line car at Church and Valley streets. PHOTO BY NAJIB jok HAKIM 




Never buy a computer 
from a store that 
you can t walk to. 



NOE VALLEY COMPUTERS 

100 Clipper St. (at Church) in San Francisco 
Opened 10 to 6 Monday thru Friday 

282-3000 

Repair Networking sales 



BERNAL HEIGHTS & NOE VALLEY 



* * * * 

FOUR STAR VIDEOS 



VHS RENTALS & SALES 



Great Selection of: 

• New Releases 

• Foreign 

• Cult 

• Classics 

• Children 

• Adult 

• Nintendo — Sega 

• Super NES 



VCR Rentals 

641-5380 

We Accept Reservations 



402 Cortland Avenue (at Bennington) 
* Open 7 Days, 11 am - 9 pm * 



Full 
Bar 




Children's 
Menu 



S t IV I It \ VMS ( II !l I I I i 



Specializing in Seafood, Pastas, Sautes, Steaks and Chops 
Crab Cioppino Every Friday and Saturday 
"Friendliest Service Around!" 



Open Daily for 
Lunch & Dinner 

4704 Mission Street 

(at Ocean) 



334-0476 




Free Parking 



after 6 pm at 
Quality Tune-Up 
parking lot 



Proprietor Steve Carrozzi, formerly Co-owner and ChefofNoe's Grill 



(Corner of Ocean & 
Mission streets) 



/ ne i\oc valley VOICt • October IWJ 



Page 15 




Mission CPOP 

Officer Lois Perillo 

( overs ii hcoi that 
stretches from 21 \t 
ami Grand View to 
Arm\ and Valencia 
To reach her. or 
partner Lorraine 
Lomhardo, call 
647-2767. 



Temporarily 
Thrown off Guard 
By Bike Crash 

By Officer Lois Perillo 

If you'd told me last month that my 
next column in the Voice would be about 
the day I flew six feet through the air 
without the aid of an airfoil, this former- 
aeronautics-major-turned-police-officer 
would probably have branded you an 
"800." (That's police code for mentally 
disabled.) Yet, here I am telling the tale 
of my being hit by a car while riding my 
patrol bicycle on 24th Street. 

On Sept. 9 at about 4:30 p.m., I had 
just finished talking with Suzette Bennett 
at the French Tulip. I said goodby. rolled 
my bicycle to the curb at 24th. and en- 
tered the street at the crosswalk, facing 
east. After fully mounting my bicycle. I 
stopped to see that the intersection of 
24th and Sanchez was clear, and then I 
began to ride across it. 

I was on my way to see Chuck Adkins 
at T. Marasco's wine store, a block down 
the street. But I didn't get far. As I 
reached the middle of the 46-foot inter- 
section. I saw a white Chevrolet coming 
towards me on 24th Street in the opposite 
lane. Suddenly, without warning or signal, 
the car accelerated and began turning left 
onto Sanchez, directly into my path. 

The driver was looking ahead and to 
his left (possibly at someone or some- 
thing on the east side of Sanchez). His 
car's tires were squealing as 1 yelled. 
"Hey, w — ." and turned my front wheel 
to the right. But I was hit before I could 
shout the words "watch out!" 

The car struck my front wheel, fork, 
left knee, and elbow, and I flew from 
three feet outside the crosswalk to three 
feet within it. I landed with a bounce on 
my right side and the butt of my gun 
(ouch!). On impact, my right knee had 
slammed into the bicycle frame, which 
ejected out from under me. 

Immediately, there were people around 
me offering aid. I remember at least two 
nurses, a psychotherapist, an off-duty 
airport police officer, and Barbara Jonesi 
from Joshua Simon I know there were 
many more of you there, including the 
nameless woman who brought me water 
despite the nurses' objections. My thanks 
to all of you. 

I called for help on my radio. How I 
dreaded telling dispatch. "519 [injury ac- 
cident] at 24th and Sanchez, officer in- 
volved, need a 408 (ambulance]." After 
all. I had been riding safely for Vh years 
of police bicycle patrol, and for 25 years 
of my life. 

Sure. I had wiped out on questionable 
road surfaces before (while off duty, and 
without the involvement of a car). And 
I'd gotten nasty "road rash," abrasions 
caused by sliding along graveled pave- 
ment. But until that fateful Wednesday, I 
had never been involved in a serious and 
potentially life-threatening bike vs. car 
accident. It was frightening and madden- 
ing, especially considering the apparent 
inattention and disregard of the car's 
driver toward me as a cyclist. 

After being treated at the hospital, I 
spent a week and a half at home recuper- 
ating from a knee strain and "multiple 
contusions" of both elbows and knees. 
At press time. I was back on light duty 
at Mission Station, anticipating a full re- 
covery. By the time this issue of the Voice 
hits the streets, I should have returned to 
my beat in Noe Valley — yes, on my bike. 

Now That I've Gotten That Out of the 
Way, here's an update on a couple of items 
I've mentioned in previous columns. 

The man I arrested for attempting to 



POLICE BEAT 



burglarize a residence at Sanchez and 
21st streets last April has pleaded guilty. 
Dwayne Robinson was sentenced to 12 
months in state prison and remanded to 
the California Department of Corrections 
on Sept. 16. 

Please remember to secure your small 
windows. This burglar somehow managed 
to climb up 15 feet to a tiny bathroom 
window, before the resident heard the 
noise and stopped the burglary in prog- 
ress. 

On the parking beat: Last month a man 
on Army Street contacted my partner. 
Officer Lorraine Lombardo, and informed 
her that he had received a note from 
someone accusing him of being a mem- 
ber of the San Francisco Parking Vigi- 
lantes. (The Vigilantes, whom 1 wrote 
about in September, are an underground 
group of citizens who have been tipping 
off the city to illegally parked cars in the 
neighborhood. ) 

The Army Street resident, who was up- 
set about being falsely accused, invited 
Lorraine to attend a neighborhood meet- 
ing that he'd arranged to address his and 
the community's concerns. She went to 
the meeting, and reported that a valuable 
exchange of viewpoints took place. Also, 
the neighbors are now considering form- 
ing a SAFE (crime watch) group. 

Noe Valley residents might be inter- 
ested to know that parking vigilantism is 
a topic that's receiving national play. The 
San Francisco contingent was the subject 
of apiece in Newsweek 5 Sept. 14 edition. 

Since There's No Place to Park in the 
city, you might find yourself driving 
around endlessly. So here are some tips 
on driving alone, excerpted from the Na- 
tionwider, a publication of Nationwide 
Insurance. 

o* Think ahead. Before your trip, plan 
the safest route and drive on well-lit, 
well-traveled streets. Keep your car in 
good condition. Never pick up a hitch- 
hiker — you can't tell a person's character 
by appearance. 

Avoid a tail. If you think you are 
being followed, stay on active streets and 
make frequent turns, checking your mir- 
rors. Still suspicious? Drive to a police 
station, gas station, or a busy store — not 
home. 

zy Employ a smart breakdown strate- 
gy. If your car suffers a mechanical prob- 
lem, keep driving (slowly on a flat tire) 
until you reach help. If your car won't 
run. put on the emergency flashers, and 
display a sign or white cloth to alert 
police. 

On a busy road, set out flares — part of 
an auto safety kit that should also include 
a flashlight, blanket, and tow company 
phone number Stay in your car with your 
doors locked. (If you travel a lot. con- 
sider getting a membership in an auto 
club and a car phone.) 

If a stranger offers aid. ask him or her 
to call for assistance. If you feel that he 
can repair your car. open the hood from 
the inside, but don't get out. If a person 
claims to be a plainclothes police officer, 
check his star/badge and identification 
card. 

O" Strive to park smart, i.e.. in well- 
lit, well-traveled places. Check for suspi- 
cious persons before you park, and then 
again before you open your door. Always 
lock your car. When you return, have 
your keys in hand, and glance into the car 
before entering. 

That's All I Have Room for This 
Month. But lastly. I'd like to say thanks 
to the entire Noe Valley community for 
the numerous good wishes, speedy recov- 
ery messages, and get well cards. 

See you on patrol in October! □ 



Noe Crimes Down 
But Car Break-ins 
Up Citywide 

By Officer Steve Ratio 

Hello. Noe Valley residents. It's time 
again for your monthly crime update 
from your one and only beat cop in the 
Church and 30th Street area. 

I've got good news to start off the col- 
umn this month. The DA's office has 
cracked under pressure from Ingleside 
CPOP. and has issued a warrant lor the 
arrest of that piece of garbage I men- 
tioned last time, the one who robs senior 
citizens on the streets of our great city. 
Hopefully, he will be caught soon and 
sentenced to his one and only environ- 
ment: prison. 

Also, the four major categories of 
crime that I keep track of — robbery, 
burglary, auto theft, and auto boosting — 
were all down in August on my beat. 

However, residents should be aware 
that according to S.F.P.D. crime stats, 
auto boosts, or break-ins, are up 200 per- 
cent this year across the city, as compared 
with last year. 

We're not sure why there has been such 
a sharp increase in these boosts, but from 
an officer's point of view, it's very dif- 
ficult to catch a thief in the act of breaking 
into a car. This is because the thief often 
does his work between 2 and 6 a.m., and 
approaches the car on foot. He can break 
your window, enter the car, and remove 
your radio and valuables in under three 
minutes. Frequently, he has an accom- 
plice waiting in a getaway car, so he can 
made an easy escape. 

Here are a couple of tips to safeguard 
your valuables. When at all possible, 
park in your garage. If you don't have a 
garage and must park on the street, park 
in a well-lit area. Remove all valuables 



Steve Ratio is the 
Community Pdlh <• 

On Patrol I ( POP) 
of fit er for upper 

Noe Valley i f mm 

Sam fie: and Arm\ 
to Mission and 
30th) His number 
at Ingleside Stan on 
Is 333-3433. 



from your car, and if possible, pull out 
your stereo. I also recommend a locking 
device like the Club for your steering 
wheel, and a car alarm with a "LED" 
light visible on your dashboard. 

Since I've been walking the Noe Valley 
and outer Mission turf, calls for service 
have consistently gone down. When I first 
started walking the beat about a year and 
a half ago. plots 802. 803, 810. and 811 
were each generating 300 to 600 calls for 
service a month. Now only plot 803 gen- 
erates 150 to 300 calls. The other plots 
are under 100 calls. 

For you folks who don't know what 
plots arc. plots 803 and 811 go from Mis- 
sion Street and Army out to 30th Street 
and up to Dolores. Plots 802 and 810 are 
bounded by Dolores. Army, and Randall, 
with Sanchez as a border on the west. 

Anyway, the decline in calls is a sure 
sign that the CPOP program, which em- 
phasizes foot or bike patrols, is a detri- 
ment to crime. 

By the way, I received a copy of the 
September Mission News the other day 
from a friend in Noe Valley. He told me 
to read the article on CPOP. 

The article was a good one, covering 
the high turnover and burnout among 
CPOP officers, but I think it was a little 
one-sided. I think the reporter should 
have come to interview someone at the 
Ingleside CPOP office. From what our 
commander tells us — and he oversees the 
Mission, Ingleside, and Taraval districts — 
according to the stats, ours is the most 
effective CPOP unit in the city. And we 
have little to no "burnout" among officers. 

I sure hope this program will be ex- 
panded and have great success in the fu- 
ture. Let me know what you think. □ 






book§ellaS 



Noe Valley's Full Service Bookstore 

presents 

Nick Bantock 

signing copies of 

Sabine's Notebook 

a sequel to 

Griffin & Sabine 

Sat. Oct. 17, 3:30-5 

3910 Twenty-Fourth Street near Sanchez 
San Francisco • (415) 282-8080 

Monday through Saturday 10 AM - 9 PM 
Sunday 10 AM -6 PM 



rage 10 





Mad & Eddie Ouran 



THE NOE VALLEY MUSIC SERIES at the Noe Valley Ministry 

No smoking, all ages welcome! 1 021 Sa nctiez near 23rd 

Sat. Oct. 3 RHIANNON 

The powerful vocalist/storyteller teams 
up with Gwen Jones (playing ancient 
instruments such as the didgendoo. 
gongs and the fuyara, a Czechoslovaks 
horn) and the superb pianist Frank Martin 
for a special performance entitled 
SOUND WAVES $10adv/$12 

Sat. Oct. 10 ROVA SAXOPHONE 

Performs Two World Premieres 

These giants of contemporary music 
premiere commissioned pieces by Fred Ho. 
"Beyond Columbus and Capitalism " and Tim Berne, "Invisible Man " in a 

concert observing the indigenous Americans' first encounters with Europeans. 
$9adv/$10 

Sat. Oct. 17 EDDIE & MAD DURAN 

Guitar great Eddie Duran has performed with Jazz legends ranging from Charlie 
Parker, Nat King Cole. Earl "Fatha " Hines and George Shearing to Stan Getz, 
Cat Tjader, Peggy Lee and Barbra Streisand. Madeline Duran is one of the most 
exciting tenor saxophonists to emerge in recent years Together their unique blend 
of soul and swing is a breath of fresh air $8adv/S10 

Sat. Oct. 24 JIWASA with Alex de Grassi 

This new "Andean Fusion" band combines the South American flutes and 
charango of Que Qui Cruz, the drums of Alvaro Cordova, the Jazz/Latin bass 
playing of David Belove and the lyrical sounds of guitarist Alex de Grassi and 
Barbra Streisand. Madeline Duran is one of the most exciting tenor saxophonists 
to emerge in recent years. Together their unique blend of soul and swing is a 
breath of fresh air $Wadv/$11 
Seniors (over 65) and children (under 12 and accompanied by an adult) halt-price at the door 
PERFORMANCES ARE AT 8:15 PM sot charge for tickets at aquarius 

ADVANCE TICKETS AVAILABLE AT AQUARIUS RECORDS. 3961 24th STREET 647-2272 

To purchase advance tickets by mail, send checks to Live Arts. P0 Box 2157. Berkeley. CA 94702 Please specify which show you want 
Your tickets will be held at the door 

It you would like to help sustain The Noe Valley Music Senas, please send your TAX DEDUCTIBLE contribution to S.F Line Arts at the 

above po box Thanks tor your help' 




New and Used 

Books • Records 
Cassettes 
Compact Discs 
Comics 
Rental Books 
Books on Tape 

Buy • Sell • Trade 

Open 10 AM to 10 PM Daily 

3850 24th Street 
821-3477 
San Francisco 

* * * GRAND OPENING * ★ ★ 

Come check out our new store! 
Dog-Eared Books 
1 1 73 Valencia Street (at 23rd) 282- 1 90 1 

New and Used Books & Music 
Open 11-7, Monday - Saturday 





Larry Ferolie ext. 203 



Annette Liberty ext. 210 



Dan Mason ext. 406 




Elizabeth Scott ext. 114 




10 



GOOD REASONS 
TO CALL 

474-6600 




Nel Leal 



ext. 109 



Ed Leavitt ext. 206 




Boris Oplanic ext. 211 




Bill Taylor ext. 125 




Nancv Marca erf 1Dfi 



B PACIFIC UNION 
RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE 



/ nc iwe valley Voice • October IW2 



Page 17 



Are You Going 
To the Noe 
Valley Fair? 

By Jeff Kali ss 

The cornucopia of culture that is our 
neighborhood will be spilling out onto 
the grounds of the Upper Noe Recreation 
Center this month, in observance of the 
second annual Noe Valley Neighborhood 
Party, hosted by Upper Noe Neighbors, 
the Friends of Noe Valley, and the East 
& West of Castro Street Improvement 
Club. 

On Sunday. Oct. II, the center's play- 
ground, at Day and Sanchez streets, will 
be jumping with musical entertainment 
from 1 1 :30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. It will also 
be filled with the aromas of local food 
vendors (such as Verona's Pizza, Carl's 
Bakery, and Drewe's Market), and the 
merchandise and crafts of local artisans, 
shops, and community groups. 

Says organizer Janice Gendreau. of Up- 
per Noe Neighbors. "'At least a thousand 
Noe Valleyans and friends came out to 
see their neighbors perform and display 
their crafts at our first Neighborhood 
Party (held in May of 1991). 

"And this year, people will have a 
chance to tour a police car [courtesy of 
CPOP Officer Steve Ratto, who'll be on 
hand to demonstrate the vehicle's com- 
puter wizardry], and dance to country, 
pop. blues, and Scottish music on an 
outdoor dance floor." 

There'll also be the Moonwalk conces- 
sion, "where kids can jump for joy like 
they did last year," said Gendreau. plus 
a number of hands-on demonstrations by 
various neighborhood service providers, 
such as physical therapists. 

The musical lineup will feature coun- 
try and western from the Swinging 
Doors, the jazz sounds of the Dana 
Atherton Trio, and rhythm and blues and 
rock, purveyed by the bands Dr. Hot 
Knife, Duck Soup, and Separate Reality. 

And jazz drummer Eddie Marshall will 
take a break from his ongoing duties at 
local clubs and in nationwide tours to do 
a "surprise"' set. Like last year, we'll have 
to wait to find out what other musicians 
Marshall will muster, but he'll probably 
bring his second-favorite instrument, the 
recorder (the tootling and not the taping 
kind). 

Marshall and spouse Sue Trupin live a 
mere drumbeat away from Upper Noe. 




offers FREE telephone 
referrals to San Francisco 
businesses recommended 
by people like you 



Auto Repair 

» Appliance Repair 

" Carpet Cleaning 
Chiropractors * Architects 
Contractors 

Electricians 
Handymen m Gardeners 

«- House Cleaners 

» Landacapers 
Plumbers » Painters 

w Roofers 

■* Window Cleaners 

...and many more! 



A public service from the 
publishers of the 

Good Service 
(iuide 




The Festival Consort, a group specializing in medieval and Renaissance music, will perform 
Oct. 25 in the Noe Valley Ministry's classical music series. 



and Trupin points out that "our kids have 
grown up on that block, and we're in- 
debted to the center." (One of the kids. 
Reevan, attended the School of the Arts, 
up on the hill, at which his father also 
taught. His brother Gabriel appeared in 
the documentary Truth or Dare, as a 
member of Madonna's touring dance team . ) 

Funnyman Barry Lank, a 25th Street 
stalwart, will also put in an appearance 
at the Neighborhood Party, with his part- 
ner in comedy, Jim Earl. Lank & Earl 
have been performing at Holy City Zoo. 
the Other Cafe, and elsewhere around 
the Bay for years. They represent a rarity 
on several counts: they do stand-up as a 
duo, they're eminently theatrical, and 



they generate an act that places their 
hilariously dorky personac into cutting- 
edge absurdist situations. 

"The only problem for a comic who 
lives in this neighborhood." testifies 
Lank, "is that when I get home from a 
gig, the only place I can hang out is at 
Happy Donuts." But just think of the 
good material you can find there, Barry. 

Roger "Mazook" Rubin will serve as 
emcee at the party, coming out from be- 
hind the anonymity of his monthly Voice 
column. 

"The Neighborhood Party provides a 
chance for our neighborhood groups to 
strut their stuff, letting all of us know 
that we're better than everyone else," 




Featuring 

Strings & Guitars 

Fridays & Saturdays 
7:00 - 9:30 pm 



EL NUEVO 

FRUTILANDIA 

648-2958 

CUBAN AND PUERTO RICAN CUISINE 
3077 24th ST. / NEAR FOLSOM, S.F. 




CALL 

495-3053 



v -PIZZA^ ' 





Delivery & Pickup 
647-1664 



Enjoy Italian Dinners in our Dining Room 
Veal • Chicken • Steaks • Seafood • Beer • Wine 
3898 24th Street (at Sanchez) San Francisco 



Rubin says modestly. He and journalist 
wife Renee Koury, who are featured in 
this month's "'More Mouths to Feed" col- 
umn, will also use the opportunity to 
show off their newest supplement. 8- 
month-old daughter Shayna. "She'll be 
on stage doing baby rap." 

For further particulars on the party, 
give Janice Gendreau a call at 64 1 -5989. 

Another Notable Happening in Octo- 
ber is a benefit for Noe Valley Sunday 
Afternoons, the chamber music series 
that was launched last spring by the Noe 
Valley Ministry, at 1021 Sanchez St. 

On Sunday, Oct. 25, at 7 p.m., the Fes- 
tival Consort, accompanied by members 
of the Holy Oak Vocal Trio, will give a 
pre-Halloween concert featuring Renais- 
sance and medieval music. The Consort's 
instruments include the shawm (a fore- 
runner of the oboe), the crumhorn, and 
the hurdy-gurdy, which is shaped like a 
lute but played by turning a crank. 

"They'll be doing what they call songs 
of 'ordinary madness.'" says series coor- 
dinator Karen Heather. "That's pagan rit- 
uals and supernatural ballads, and lyrics 
dealing with the darker side of humanity: 
drunkenness, murder, war. and lust." 

Heather reports that last season's clas- 
sical series "ended up in the black, finan- 
cially, but now we're on our way to estab- 
lishing a board of directors, and we need 
to get donor support." 

Local residents and merchants who'd 
like to help ensure the continuation of the 
series should contact Heather at her Min- 
istry office, 282-2317. □ 




Comedians Lank <& Earl (Barry Lank and 
Jim Earl) will goof around in the daylight at 
the Noe Valley Neighborhood Party, to 
unfold Oct. 11 on the playing field at Upper 
Noe Rec Center. 



For the Health 
of It 

Personal Training for 
Health & Fitness as it was 
meant to be — in your home! 

Evelyn Baumberger, ACE 
Certified Personal Trainer 

Call 773-9854 

Leave name, phone 
number and best time 
to call vou. 



CASUARINA 
CONSTRUCTION 



Fine 
Custom Carpentry 

* 330-5477 ♦ 





DINE IN* TAKE OUT 

FAST, FREE DELIVERY! 
285-3212 

4042 24TH ST. SAN FRANCISCO 

HOURS; 1 1 AM - 1 1 PM SUNDAY - THURSDAY 
OPEN TIL MIDNIGHT ON FRIDAY AND SATURDAY 
NOW ACCEPTING VISA , MASTERCARD AND DISCOVER CARD 

Now Delivering Beer • Minimum Order for Delivery: $1 0 
Delivery starts at 1 1 :00 am everyday 
Call and Let us Deliver to your Parties and other Special Occasions 




CYBELLE'S 
FOOTBALL COUPON W 



4042 24th Street 
BETWEEN NOE AND CASTRO 

. 285-3212 . 



$2 OFF > 
ANY 12" ' 
OR 14" PIZZA 




• ONE COUPON PER PIZZA . ■ ' 
NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER OFFER 



Come watch Monday Night Football at the restaurant 
and enjoy special promotional discounts on store only) 



Get involved 



In the campaign to elect 



Clinton Gore 




Noe Valley Democratic Club 



November Election Recommendations 

US Senate 
Feinstein Boxer 

Supervisor 
Alioto Bierman Hallinan Jones Medina 

School Board 
Yee Chester Maxwell Phillips 

Community College Board 

Wdfred Rodis Salazar-Hobson Sumchai 

The Noe Valley Democratic Club meets the 3rd Wednesday each 
month at the Noe Valley Ministry, 1021 Sanchez (nr 24th). 

For Campaign or Club Information: President Rick Hauptman 647-0549. 
To become a member, send $15 annual dues to 
Noe Valley Democratic Club • 1595 Noe #6 • San Francisco CA 94131 




4077 - 24th Street (Next to Post Office) SF, CA 941 14 

(415) 824-7318 



*r Color Film Processing - 1 Hour Service 
car Color Enlargement, Family Portrait 
isr Copy Old Photo, Wedding Photography 
Passport, Green Card and Visa Photos 
isr Print from Slides and Negatives 




We Do 
Quality Black & White 
Printing and Developing 



OPEN: 

Monday to Friday 
9:00 am - 6:30 pm 
Saturday: 10:00 - 6:30 
Sunday: 10:00 - 5:00 



CONVENIENT 
24 HOURS 
FILM DROP BOX 
AT THE FRONT DOOR 



THOSE 
ORANGE 
SIGNS SELL 



i 



Hartford 

PROPERTIES 



Ha 



1929 Market Street 863-7502 



The Noe Valley Voice ■ October 1992 



Page 19 



Jeremy Kotas: 
An Architect 
Who Keeps the 
Fun in His 
Frameworks 

By Jane Underwood 

Laidlev Street architect Jeremy Kotas 
is wearing a bright, greenish-yellow shirt 
that sets off a green tie bursting with 
huge purple, rust, and cream-colored 
polka dots. 

The polka dots seem to gesture to the 
large, tetrahedron-shaped "sculpture" of 
bowling balls on his living room floor. 
And both the tie and the bowling balls 
reflect Kotas' boldly innovative and hu- 
morous vision, as well as his abiding love 
of design. 

Kotas' architectural creations are known 
not only around the world, but also right 
on his own block of Laidley Street (just 
south of Noe and 30th), where he has de- 
signed more than half a dozen houses. 

One of those rare birds who doesn't 
make much of a distinction between work 
and play. Kotas dives enthusiastically 
into talking about his career. For him. 
architecture is a passion and a pleasure. 

"Have you heard about Mary Pleasant — 
thought to be a famous madam — and her 
connection with the Bell Mansion over 
here [at 192-96 Laidley] ?" he asks. 

"The Bell Mansion was supposedly built 
by an attorney. Bell, who had a connec- 
tion with Pleasant. And this big 1870s 
house was probably the only thing out 
here for many years, except for the milk 
stop near where Robert Prittkin now lives 
(the Pritikin Mansion, at 30th and Chen- 
ery streets]. Mary Pleasant had these lit- 
tle cribs, as they called them — cabins or 
cottages that businessmen would get on 
the train and come out to at lunch time, 
for what were known as 'nooners.' 

"Well. I bought a cottage at 135 Laid- 
ley St. in 1975. and turned it into the first 
house I did here, which is known as Laid- 
ley Castle. When I bought it. it was a 
little tiny cottage with wonderful founda- 
tions, essentially one room with a little 
sleeping room down below — cabin would 
be a better word. 

"Then 1 was told that 1 had bought the 
last of these little cribs. It had a few 
boards horizontally, and a lot of shingles 
over it. like a big basket. 

"What we did was extend the founda- 
tions and build up. and in the process, it 
was totally transformed." 

At the time. Kotas. now 48, was just 
starting out. and had a job working for 
the Planning Department. "I didn't have 




Architect Jeremy Kolas would have to wear a pretty outrageous getup to outshine the dramatic facade of his c urrent residence at 123 Laidlex 
St.— one of over half a dozen homes he's designed on the Nock. PHOTOS BY CHARLES KbNNARD 



any money," he says. "The reason it was 
called the Castle is because I was a young 
architect ambitious to do my first build- 
ing. I thought I might never get to do 
another one. and I wanted to test my 
ideas. 

"1 had been living in a storefront down 
in the Mission, and living in one big 
space like that was what informed the 
main plan of this house. It's one big 
room, but it's done with a series of al- 
coves, so you can't see it all at once. In 
order to experience the space and the 
qualities of the space, you have to move 
through it." 

Ray and Kay Roberts, w ho bought Laid- 
ley Castle in 1981 (when Kotas moved 
down the street to another cottage he has 
since rebuilt, at 123 Laidley ). were drawn 
to the house right away. "We had looked 
at a lot of Victorians, and realized that 
they were very dark and compartmental- 
ized." recalls Ray. 

The high-beamed ceilings and open- 
ness appealed to them, along with "the 
fact that he left the plywood ceiling, 
which has really turned a very nice sort 
of honey color. A lot of people who 
walked through looking at the house 
when it was for sale said. "Jeremy, when 
are you gonna finish the ceiling?' And he 
said. 'That's the way it is.' And they'd 
walk through and leave. But to me. that's 



one of the more interesting aspects of the 
house." 

Perhaps the most interesting aspect, 
however, is the sliding garage door that 
forms most of the front wall of the house, 
rolling up to flood the kitchen with air 
and light. "Jeremy's very, very whimsi- 




-5 




Jeremy Kotas. partner Tony Pantaleoni, and 
housemate Skip Shaffer stand in front of a 
liciraxe at 128 Laidley that \ made from one 
of Kolas' favorite materials plywood. 



cal." laughs Ray. "and because of that, 
very creative." 

"When I lived there." says Kotas. "if I 
was off on a Saturday. I'd roll it up in the 
morning and it'd stay up all day long. 
And the neighborhood cats and dogs 
would come by and pay a visit. Neigh- 
bors would see it was open, and they'd 
drop in and have coffee." 

The most fun part of designing Laidley 
Castle, says Kotas. was fancying up its 
facade in an original way. but without 
entirely disregarding San Francisco's ar- 
chitectural history. "I collected together 
a pile of things that were, to me. reminis- 
cent of California architectural events 
and traditions — Victorian in the fence 
and iron cresting, and Mission Revival in 
the shape of this parapet arch and in the 
stairway railings. It's an eclectic motif of 
bits and pieces of California's past, pres- 
ent, and future. 

"But the single most important con- 
nection with California's architectural 
past is the landscape. This bougamvillca 
is a huge pile of magenta color, and that 
cotoneaster is still there. You know. Ber- 
nard Maybeck used to say that a house 
was merely an excuse to get out of the 
garden in case it rained." 

Maybeck. an early 20th century archi- 

Continued on fidge 20 




'Sent for 



415-550-8112 



he q#yiEi§oy 



r/zw ar>d Used Qlotr/irx^ ar>d /teeessories 
noe valley mall • 3915 24th street • san francisco, ca. 941 14 



it 

I 

m 



H5N> t£$ *> 

at le-r-y S /</<t/t/<' .^//v<fU 



/At/ // 



282-0722 
/J20 <Ww a/ 24/X J/. 



^yfjfc «$gs <ri&* -*lrv 



i 




"I felt veiy safe, it was 
the most comfortable 
exam I've ever had/' 



LYON-MARTIN WOMEN'S HEALTH SERVICES 



...because we know bow you feel 



1748 Market St. @ Valencia 

TEL - 415/565-7667 
TDD -415/252-7499 



theHAIRC UTTER S&co 




$8 on 
First Perm 
ol the Day 



SAN FRANCISCO 

4027 - 24th Street 
821-6556 

Call (or Perm Specials 
New Extended Hours M - F 10 - 6 45 • Sat 9-515 



J"$20ft Any Haircut"] 

[ with this ad J 
expires 10-31-92 
void Saturdays 



The Noe Valley Voice • October 1992 




The solid circular railing of the sleeping loft in Jeremy Kolas' house at 123 Laidley St provides privacy, but also allows him to talk to guests 
in the living room below, "while I'm brushing my teeth." he says. PHOTOS BY CHARLl s KlNNARD 



Page 20 

Architect in 
Residence on 
Laidley Street 

Continued from Page 19 

tect. definitely influenced Kotas. whose 
back yard at 123 Laidley pays homage to 
his mentor s love of the outdoors. The 
sloping hill beneath the deck has a cozy 
cobblestone terrace (made of cobble- 
stones taken from Laidley Street in the 
1930s) surrounded by a landscape unique 
in its "fencelessness." 

"The fence just kind of collapsed," Ko- 
tas explains, "so we removed it and never 
put up another. (A few neighbors have 
followed suit.) If all the fences disap- 
peared, we would have a park in com- 
mon. The sense ol openness is consider- 
ably greater as soon as the fences arc- 
gone, because you can't sec through the 
foliage, so you have no idea how far it 
goes, and it really feels much more like 
a little splendid piece of wilderness." 

Southern California architect Frank 
Gehry has been another big influence. 
After graduating from U.C. Berkeley m 
architecture and moving to Los Angeles 
in 1971, Kotas worked with Gehry for 
two years. 

"Frank made the chain link fence pop- 
ular and respectable " notes Kotas. "And 
he's done all sorts of great, funny, wacky 
houses — big. strange things. 

"His buildings promote a sense of ex- 
uberance that I find irresistible. Think 
about it. Buildings are for the most part 
simple, stupid, economic calculations, 
where somebody wants to use the tech- 
niques of constructing a box. But of 
course, once you claim one as your box. 
then the emotional stuff takes root and 
flourishes. 

"From the outside, this house I live in 
now is a little box. And if I took the 
colors off the box, it would lose a consid- 
erable amount of its exuberance." The 
house is coated with a lively and uncon- 
ventional combination of blue, yellow, 
coral, and green paint, reminiscent of 
primitive Mexican folk art. and topped 
by — what else? — a Mobile Oil sign. 

"I've always been fascinated with 
commercial signs and letters." Kotas 
says. "I used to collect them." He walks 
over to a wall of bookshelves and pulls 
out a wooden letter "K" from a nook. 
"This K, I've had it for years. It's an 
abstract version of 'Keep on Trucking.' 
you know that cartoon? And it's also the 
letter K from a really wacky sign." 

The fantasy that inhabits Kotas' work 
gets balanced by the practicality of his 
partner, Anthony Pantaleoni. "Tony is very 
thorough and pragmatic." says Kotas. "He's 
always trying to bring me into the ordi- 
nary, normal level of the 20th century." 

Their combined insights have garnered 
many awards for their 11-year-old archi- 
tectural firm, Kotas/Pantaleoni, located 
in the South of Market area. Those in- 
clude a 1989 Award of Honor for Design 
Excellence from the American Institute 
of Architects, several Sunset magazine 
Western Home Awards (one for the house 
they did at 102 Laidley), and a Golden 
Nugget Grand Award for Most Innovative 
Housing, from Pacific Coast Builders. 
Of these, Kotas is most proud of the last. 



because it gives recognition, he says, to 
"a departure from the norm." 

"You know, architecture is a very com- 
plicated thing," Kotas says. "In the big- 
gest sense, it's | about creating) form, like 
the dome of City Hall. The dome stands 
for the dome of heaven, it stands for per- 
fection and the centrality of power." 

But after you decide on the form, you 
have to pick the materials — and this gets 



to the heart of Kotas' interest in designing 
"vernacular" buildings — or structures 
that respect "plain, ordinary, everyday" 
local building traditions. 

"This is a plywood box," he points 
out. "But there can be cement, plaster, 
stucco, or colored plexiglass. You have a 
lot more ability to express things through 
materials, and materials have a lot to do 
with vernacular building traditions." 



"For instance, traditional buildings in 
Italy were always rendered over in stuc- 
co. The Romans used actual marble, be- 
cause they had a lot of slaves and could 
afford to have it cut. In San Francisco, a 
traditional building material used at the 
turn of the century was clapboard sid- 
ing — channel rustic siding. 

"Today we have plywood, and what we 
can do is explore plywood as a vernacu- 
lar. For instance, we built a house in the 
Mission District and turned sheets of 
plywood sideways, as a modern, over- 
scaled reference to clapboard siding." 

Finally, Kotas continues, architecture 
is "the actual shaping of the individual 
elements." The roof at Laidley Castle 
slopes to the street, for example, and so 
he took the vertical line of the roof's 
drainpipe, and extended it into a flagpole. 

"Did you know that one of San Fran- 
cisco's nicknames at the turn of the cen- 
tury was City of Flags ? In those days, a 
lot of people arrived by boat, and so from 
the water level, as the city went up over 
the hills, buildings would have flags over 
their front doors. There were flags every- 
where. Given the breezes, there was this 
little extra motion. It must've been a 
wonderful thing to see. Anyway, the flag- 
pole on this house was my way of localiz- 
ing and personalizing that whole idea." 

Or take Kotas' personal perspective 
on bathtubs. "One of my pet peeves," he 
declares, "is why do we stick bathing 
areas in tiny little closets? I've never seen 
why a bathtub should be just crammed in 
with the toilet. The Victorians started 
out right when they had a water closet 
and a bathing room. 

"In Laidley Castle, I tried to put the 
bathtub on wheels, so you could wheel it 
over by the fireplace, or wheel it over by 
the view. Well, that's very costly to do. 
but I'm working on it, and I'll do it the 
next time I do a house." In the meantime, 
Kotas' own bathtub is situated in a special 
little bathtub "compartment" built into 
the wall of his loft bedroom. 




Kotas' design for the Wal greens at Castro and Jersey in Noe Valley was titled, appropriately, 
"Small Town Drugstore." 



(415) 285-8588 



SAN FRANCISCO 
AUTO REPAIR CENTER 

Foreign and Domestic Auto Repairs 

• NOW OPEN 7 DAYS 

• Dependable Work— Honest Prices 

• Basic Auto Repair Classes 

• A Community-Oriented People's Garage 

• Men & Women Mechanics 

• Official California Smog Station 



611 Florida Street (near 18th Street) • San Francisco 94110 




Thomas V. Wearing 

ATTORNEY 

Personalized Service 



Wills, Living Trusts, Probate & Civil Litigation 
870 Market Street Suite 900 
San Francisco, California 94102 
362-7414 
Free Consultation 



Noe Valley's Original Cafe 

HERB'S FINE FOODS 

Specializing in Breakfast and Lunch 

3991 24th Street (at Noe) 

826-8937 • 550-9211 

Open Monday - Friday 6:30 am - 3:30 pm 
Saturday & Sunday 7 am - 4 pm 

Since 1943 

It's Herb's for the Best in Noe Valley Dining! 



The Nae Valley Voice • October 1992 



Page 21 




Jeremy Kotas Builds Castles 
In the Air and on the Ground 



The Kolas landmarks on Laidlex are so distinctive that they each have a name The building 
with all the angles at 102 Laidlex (above, left) is called the K P. House (for KotaslPantaleoni). 
134 Laidlex. has been dubbed the Sand Castle, because of its wavy first story: and the 
impressive structure at 140 Laidlex. the one with the exebrows. is called the Owl House. 
PHOTOS BY CHARLES KENNARD. 



In 1987, Kotas and his housemate of 
several years. Skip Shaffer ("Skip is what 
I would call an artist/architect, where the 
art of architecture is his purest con- 
cern"), collaborated on designing a dis- 
tinctly un-Victorian house at 140 Laidley. 
And they ruffled more than a few neigh- 
bors' feathers. 

"For a while." recalls Kotas, "people 
called it Hell House. But then the neigh- 
borhood kids started calling it Owl House," 
perhaps because of the split pediment on 
the facade, which bears a distinct re- 
semblance to a pair of eyebrows — one of 
them quizzically raised. 

"It's a very adventuresome house," 
Kotas says of the three-story, 40-foot- 
high structure with 20-foot windows. "As 
you go up through the house, it gets in- 
creasingly more light, so at the top. 
there's a sort of frenzy of light from all 
directions. So it's a progress from dark 
to light, and from the past, down below, 
to the future, up above. It's also a travel 
from compression to expansion." 

The Owl House, completed last year, 
is owned by Dick Ingraham, a retired 
geneticist, and Bill Gregory, an audio- 
metrist. Says Ingraham, "Did you see the 
article that appeared in the Examiner on 
a dream house, the features that it would 
have? Well, all of them are incorporated 
in this house — cubic space, volume, not 
having a lot of walls. In the Victorian 
home, when everything was shameful, 
sex and all of that, of course you wanted 
to have privacy, so you cut it up into all 
these little cubicles. But in a more liberal 
age, that seems to be rather ridiculous. 
What you want is space, volume, light, 
and airiness." 

"I'm interested in increasing people's 
awareness of the world around them," 
says Kotas. "You can live in this tiny little 
Victorian world — many people in San 



Francisco do. There's nothing wrong 
with that; I'm just not interested in it. 

"In the Owl House, I'm concentrating 
on that aspect of a building that's hardest 
to pin down, which is being alive and 
being in it.... When Dick and Bill's 
house was going up. Bill was very ner- 
vous, thinking, God. they can see me 
when I'm going to bed at night. And I 
never talked to him about it. and by the 
time the thing was done, and he'd experi- 
enced it for himself, he realized that hey, 
ain't nobody gonna see you runnin' around 
raw up there, and if they are, so what? 
He accommodated himself to that idea. 
Of course, not everyone could do that." 

Born in Seattle but raised in South 
Dakota, Kotas speculates that "it was 
growing up on the Great Plains that influ- 
enced my ideas about architecture. The 
Great Plains is one soothing platitude, 
and the buildings punctuate it like little 
jumbly events, whether they're the farm- 
ing parts — you see trees and buildings in 
little clumps — or those little towns with 
grain elevators and church spires. Out on 
the grassland plains, the towns alone are 
the only monuments, and then natural 
features begin to take over — bluffs and 
cliffs and isolated mesas. I still prefer 
that landscape above all, where you see 



the essentials, the pure essentials of a 
given thing or situation. 

"When I was a boy, we lived in one of 
those funny old houses that had enclosed 
porches, very vernacular. And it was 
those buildings that gave me the feelings 
I have for buildings. That, and seeing 
modernistic churches go up on the plains. 
My mother and my Aunt Leona went to 
the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. Minne- 
sota, when I was about 8 or 9 years old. 
and they went out of their way to see this 
church, because they were very religious 
women. I remember thinking that this 
was a great event, if they drove all the 
way out of the way to see this building. 
I don't know that I made anything of the 
building, but I made a lot of their reaction 
to it." 

In fact, Kotas' small town upbringing 
may have come in handy when his firm 
designed the Walgreen's store (formerly 
Little Bell ) at Castro and Jersey streets in 
Noe Valley. 

"We showed them five variations," he 
says. "One had the proportions of a Vic- 
torian building — we put bay windows up 
there as ghosts, just the timber outline, 
very beautiful. The fog would have come 
in through the windows — it would have 
been a storefront down below, with this 



NICHOLAS DE WAR 

Certified 
Pubhc 
Accountant 




• General Accounting 

• Income Tax 

• Please call for more information 


317 Noe Street 

(at Market) 

4 1 5 • 863 • 8485 



Victorian ghost looming up. 

"But they chose the one we called 
'Small Town Drugstore.' It's very sweet, 
meant to be cheerful and commodious. 

"The best thing Walgreen's did was 
that they bought into that little tile bench 
and then that little tile wall — simple de- 
vices, but they certainly give the parking 
lot more of a human scale, like a walled 
garden or any other thing you cherish, 
because parking's a valuable commodity." 

New Noe Valley projects include a 
house on Elizabeth Street near Castro 
("The owner's in the auto repair business, 
and I'm working hubcaps into the theme") 
and a building on Church Street between 
22nd and 23rd ("We did a play on Edwar- 
dian things, but we did it in a way that 
you also know it's a modern building"). 

"I'm very aware of older buildings and 
traditions in San Francisco and else- 
where," Kotas adds. "But the world isn't 
gonna stay rooted in 1992 or 1892; the 
world is gonna go on and do whatever it 
does." 

And Kotas is gonna go on turning 
heads with his version of late 20th cen- 

And Kotas is gonna go on turning 
heads with his version of late 20th cen- 
tury architecture — even if it strikes some 
people as just a little too far out. 

"Everything around us was designed 
by somebody. Everything!" he says. "I 
mean, the locations of these trees, and 
yes, even the trees themselves, in some 
cases. 

"Everything we come in touch with, 
unless you lay on your back and look at 
the sky and put blinders on, is a human 
creation. And it just amazes me. Every 
so often I think that thought, and it just 
seems overwhelmingly important that we 
know as much about ourselves and the 
world around us as possible, since we're 
making it. We are making this world." □ 




NOE VALLEY MINISTRY 

Presbyterian Church, USA 
1021 Sanchez Street at 23rd Street 282-2317 
Sunday Worship: 10 a.m. Childcare provided 

Flea Market and Bake Sale 

Saturday, October 10, 9:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. 

Housewares, Objets d' Art 
Toys, Games, Books 
All day Gourmet Luncheon 
Antic antiques from the attic of Antrofaus 

DON'T MISS IT! Sanchez Street between 23rd and 24th 



BARGAINS 
BARGAINS 
BARGAINS 



25% OFF 
ALL DRY CLEANING 

Any time with this ad 

<pn v< ;// coupon when you bring in your dry cleaning order) 

i grates i" <i »2 



• *.::: THE tax 

XS-lManagers 



Carol Robinson, ea 

Memtvn National Association 
>•! / iirolltd Agents 



Bookkeeping for Small Business 
Tax Preparation Available 
Tax Planning and other Financial Services 

Call today for a free 1/2 hour consultation 



300 Vicksburg St., #1, S.E 

(corner of 24th near Church St.) 



821-3200 

Notary Public Service 



Castro Street Clinic 

Personalized Medical Care for Women and Men 
in a warm, friendly environment 

Lisa Capaldini, M.D. • Sherron Mills, R.N., N.P. 
• Women's Health Care • 
• Donor Insemination Services • 
• Evening Hours • 

533 Castro St. •861-3366 

By Appointment Only 



WHEN EXCELLENCE 
COUNTS . . . DEMAND 
THE VERY BEST! 




Sue Bowie 

Top 1% Nationally 
# 1 Franciscan Agent 



Office: 664-9175 
ext. 224 

Home: 824-1062 



The professional who really listens 
to her client's real estate needs, 

and helps them achieve their goals 
in a positive and friendly manner. 

IN-DEPTH KNOWLEDGE OP OUR NEIGHBORHOOD: 

• NOE VALLEY HOME OWNER FOR 15 YRS 

• ACTIVE COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT 



FRANCISCAN 
two blocks from Clipper 

675 Portola Drive 
San Francisco. CA 94127 



PROPERTIES ^MISQj, 
oer& Portola ^ . " 




YOQA 

with Donna Farhi Schuster 



Moving From the Inner Body 

at 66-112 Sanchez Street (James Howel Studio) 

All levels of experience welcome. 
For a current schedule of ongoing classes call 



282-7063 



Mexico Retreat 
November 20-23, 1992 



Your body was designed to be healthy! 

You don't have to live with pain and stress 



Pain tells you something is 
out of balance. Chiropractic 
diagnoses and treats the cause 
of your imbalance so healing 
occurs naturally from within. 



Regain your optimal potential 
and energy with gentle, non- 
force treatment. Call for a free 
consultation. 

Insurance — Auto, work, personal 
Open Weekdays and Evenings 



Dr. Barbara Turunen, Chiropractor 

3831 24th Street (at Church) 
641-1100 



The sweetest gift 

OF ALL. 



Send the FTD 
Sweetest Day 
Bouquet. 

Just call or 
visit us today. 
Sweetest Day 
is Saturday, 
October 17. 





F LOWE R S r 



824-3233 



4080 24th St. (Noe) 




The Noe Vallrv Voir,- • October \99l 



Page 23 



Asian-American 
Themes Take 
Center Stage 
In the Plays of 
Philip Gotanda 

By Larry Beresford 

Philip Kan Gotanda's portrayals of Jap- 
anese-American family life are rooted in 
the stories of his parents and grandpar- 
ents, as well as in his own childhood in 
Stockton, Calif. 

"For me," recalls the 41-year-old play- 
wright and screenwriter, "Stockton is hot 
summers and foggy autumns and winters, 
and also the fact that it's flat and sur- 
rounded by farm land. At times the fog 
shrouds the whole city all day long and 
all night long, and creates this strange 
surreal atmosphere. 

"Some of my early childhood mem- 
ories are of my father, who loved to go 
out fishing in the delta, or duck hunting 
in autumn. He would drive out into the 
fog and disappear and come back again 
with these ducks," Gotanda says. 

"He was also the last of the old-style 
country doctors. People would come to 
his office; they wouldn't have an appoint- 
ment. He serviced a lot of the Japanese- 
American population, going out to the 
farmers in the delta. All night long, my 
father would get phone calls. I'd hear 
him getting up, and he'd grab his black 
bag. and my mother sometimes would 
get up and make him a cup of coffee, and 
he would go. And when I'd get up he'd 
be coming in, sometimes with a crate of 
tomatoes or a gunnysack of corn. 

"That was Stockton for me. You could 
go to the outskirts, and these fields would 
go on and on. Sometimes you'd smell the 
air — the sour sweet smell of rotting fruit 
would just waft over the town." 

Such images resonate in Gotanda's 
plays, which have been widely produced 
on stage and television in the past decade, 
earning him Guggenheim and National En- 
dowment for the Arts fellowships, three 
Rockefeller play-writing awards, and 
most recently, the Lila Wallace Reader's 
Digest Writer's Award 

Gotanda, however, did not set out to 
be a writer. "It was all by accident." he 
explains, from the dining room of his 
Diamond Street Victorian. In fact, back 
in the 1960s, he started out as a musician, 
playing guitar and singing in rock bands. 

"We were big fans of the Kinks." re- 
calls Gotanda, who. with his prominent 
earring and Lyle Lovett hairdo, still 
maintains somewhat of a stage persona. 
"We were a garage band. The neighbors 
complained, called the police — the usual 
Stories. Then after I got out of college. I 
tried to make it as a singer/songwriter in 
the Bay Area, Santa Barbara, and Los 
Angeles." 

In the mid-1970s, country-rock artists 
like the Eagles and Jackson Browne were 
big. 'I was very much into their music." 
Gotanda notes, "but doing it with Asian- 
American themes, with songs like The 
Ail-American Asian Punk' and 'Ballad 
of the Issei' [first-generation Japanese- 
Americans], which was not too commer- 
cially viable at that time," he laughs. 

After several years of hustling but not 
making a living at his music, Gotanda 
felt worn down and burned out. "All my 
friends were becoming doctors and law- 
yers," he says, "and here I was singing in 



Wlhmnell 
& 

Hearer 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 

4091 24th Street 
NOE VALLEY 
(415)641-0700 




Playwright, rock musician, and screenwriter Philip Gotanda recently added filmmaking to his 
repertoire, and he staged some of the scenes for his first venture. The Kiss, at What's for 
Dessert on Church Street. PHOTO BY TOM WACHS 



these sleazy clubs at open mikes." 

So he stopped performing and enrolled 
at Hastings Law School in San Fran- 
cisco. But after only a couple of years, 
his artist's heart "really missed the 
music." and during lulls in lecture halls 
or while working at the North Beach- 
Chinatown legal aid office, he wrote a 
rock opera called The Avocado Kid. 
based on a Japanese fairy tale. The mu- 
sical was accepted by a Los Angeles thea- 
ter group called East West Players, and 
in 1979 Gotanda happily closed his law 
books and headed south. 

"I knew nothing about the whole pro- 
cess of theater," he admits. "But I went 
down to L.A. and worked with them and 
played in the band and had a real fun 
time — and then just kept on doing it." 

In the 13 years since The Avocado Kid. 
Gotanda has written numerous plays and 
film scripts. There was A Song for a Nisei 
Fisherman, a play about a second- 



generation. Hawaiian-born Japanese- 
American like Gotanda's late father; and 
Yankee Dawg You Die. about Asian- 
American actors working in Hollywood, 
which premiered at the Berkeley Reper- 
tory Theatre in 1989. 

He also wrote The Wash, which was 
originally produced by American Play- 
house for public television and later 
staged in New York and Los Angeles. 
His Fish Head Soup, an angry critique of 
"the American disease of racism." pre- 
miered last year at the Berkeley Rep, and 
will be revived in a revised version next 
year at San Francisco's Asian American 
Theater Company. 

Throughout his career Gotanda has 
h i lowed the classic writer's dictum: 
write what you know. 

Tm just trying to tell stories that I feel 
passionately about." he says. "The fact 
that they're Asian-American or Japanese- 
American is simply because that's what 



DIRT CHEAP 
PLANE TICKETS 

824-2550 

Book Charters to Europe Now 



dirt cheap travel 
A 3850 23rd St. 





0BC CONSTRUCTION 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



FOUNDATION WORK: 

RETAINING WALLS 
ORYROT 
TERMITE REPAIRS 
CONCRETE FOOTINGS ANO PIERS 

EARTHQUAKE PROOFING: 
FOUNDATION BOLTS 
SMEAR WALLS 
POST / BEAM HARDWARE 
ANO OTHER SEISMIC WORK 



S.F.Smo» 
1975 



826 - 6918 



FREE 
ESTIMATES 



CALIF. 
UCEUSf 
•S2S7SJ 



NOE VALLEY'S FAVORITE JAPANESE RESTAURANT • SINCE 1975 
OLDEST SUSHI BAR IN SAN FRANCISCO 






CHEF'S 
CHOICE 
OF SUSHI 



MATSUYA 

Serving Sushi • Teriyaki • Donburi Casserole 
Japanese Beer & Wine 
Complete Dinner from $7.50 
Open 4-11* Monday - Saturday 
3856 24th Street 

Between Sanchez and Vicksburg 

282-7989 



EE3 



I am. I think that you have to tell your 
tale as specifically as possible, from as 
deep an emotional and cultural stand- 
point as you can. The better you can do 
that, the more universal it becomes." 

Over the past year, Gotanda has been 
re-working The Avocado Kid — in collab- 
oration with Dan Kuramoto, founder of 
the popular fusion jazz-pop band Hiro- 
shima — for the Mark Taper Forum in 
LOS Angeles. He also recently directed 
Uncle Tadeo. a play by a Japanese- 
Canadian friend. R.A Shiomi 

And he's been branching out in a new 
direction: filmmaking. 

"I had been wanting to direct my own 
film for a while." he says. "They would 
let me write but not direct, which makes 
sense because film is a very expensive 
medium. So I decided to do my own I 
wenl out and raised the money, and 
wrote, shot, produced, acted in. and di- 
rected a 14-minute short called The 
Kiss." 

Filmed earlier this year at Gotanda's 
favorite Noe Valley haunt — the Church 
Street coffeehouse What's for Dessert — 
The Kiss features Gotanda's own actor 
and filmmaker friends, and "tells a day 
in the life of an office worker, and how 
one event forces him to either act and be 
brave and change his life, or else stay the 
same kind of office bureaucrat and paper 
pusher." 

Gotanda says his more recent projects 
have been influenced by the disturbing 
rise in Japan-bashing and acts of violence 
committed against Asian-Americans — 
as well as the Rodney King riots in Los 
Angeles, and the ensuing media focus on 
tensions between African-Americans and 
Korean-Americans. 

"For me it's been a time of realizing 
that the model I have used to look at the 
world, born out of the 1960s and 1970s — 
the third world movement, with black 
brothers and sisters and Asian brothers 
and sisters all being one together — 
doesn't work anymore. It's a different 
world. There's a great deal of racial ten- 
sion among everybody these days, and to 
feel it you only have to walk down the 
street." Gotanda says. 

"It comes ultimately from not having 
enough information, and not getting 
groups to sit down together and dialogue. 
You've got to force it to happen, and it's 
not easy, and it isn't always pretty." 

Gotanda recently developed a series of 
programs at East West Players featuring 
a cross-cultural dialogue on stage be- 
tween an Asian-American playwright, 
David Henry Hwang, and an African- 
American playwright and performance 
artist, Anna Devearc-Smith, "interview- 
ing each other about their work, asking 
questions, and opening it up to the audi- 
ence." He is also working with African- 
American director Timothy Bond, whom 
he met at a recent theater conference, on 
a new production of Fish Head Soup, 
which will play in Seattle. 

To avoid writer's isolation, and keep in 
touch with some social reality. Gotanda 
often does his writing in coffee shops 
around the city. "I just bring my little 
portable laptop computer and sit at What's 
for Dessert, with all these people around 
producing a kind of white noise — so I 
can trick myself into not thinking about 
what I'm doing," he says. 

Gotanda and his wife, Diane Emiko 
Takei, an actress and real estate agent, 
discovered What's for Dessert after they 
moved to Glen Park four years ago. 

"Mervyn's is my favorite place to go." 
he adds. "He even lets me plug in my 
computer when 1 start running out of 
battery power. . . . And he let us shoot 
The Kiss there. 1 even put Mervyn and 
his son, Jason, in the film." 



Noe Valley Deli 

4007 24th Street at Noe 
824-8373 

Fresh Turkey & Roast Beef Sandwiches 
Homemade Falafel 
Fresh Salads 

ALL MADE DAILY 

Open Monday - Saturday 9 am - 7 pm 
Sunday 10am -6 pm 



Page 24 



The Noe Vallev Voice ■ October 1992 





FREE TREE 

Receive a 
Free Replacement Tree 

with any Tree Removal 
with this coupon only 

Licensed & Bonded CA Lie. #562324 



Landscapes & Tree Care 

NO JOB TOO BIG OR TOO SMALL 
Call Us Today! 

566-5536 564-8077 

Landscape Design & Installation 
Fences • Decks • Retaining Walls • Frost Damage Repair 
Drainage & Irrigation • Drought Tolerant Plants 
Transplanting • Nightlighting 

Complete Tree Service • Certified Arborist 

Grown Reduction • Pruning • Trimming • Reshaping 
Removals • Tree Health Maintenance • Insured 



Free Estimates 
Reasonable Rates 



Over 16 Years Experience 
Satisfaction Guaranteed 



10% OFF WATER CONSERVING DRIP SYSTEMS 




American Bakery 



Perhaps the best tarts in 
San Francisco.' 

San Francisco Examiner 



598 Chenery Street, Glen Park • 239-5525 
673 Portola Drive, by Tower Market • 753-0750 



MACINTOSH 

Computer Rental 

Voice Mail Now Available 



SHIPPING SERVICES 



POSTAL SERVICES 



SHIPPING 

Send packages with UPS, DHL, or 
Federal Express. Overnight, 2nd 
Day Air and Ground Service. 

PACKING SERVICE & 
BOXES 

Buy packing supplies. For real 
convenience, let the MBE experts do 
the packing for you. 



MAIL BOX RENTAL & 
PARCEL RECEIVING 

Private mailbox with street address. 
UPS and other carriers' packages 
received for you. 

STAMPS 

Stamps and metered mail are 
available at your local MBE. 



BUSINESS & COMMUNICATION SERVICES 



COPIES 

Quality copies with volume pricing. 
2-sided copies, enlarging, reducing 
and sorting available. 

COMPUTER RENTAL 

Macintosh and Laser Printer. 

PASSPORT PHOTOS 

2-color photos in 2 minutes. 



FAX 

Send or receive faxes from around 
the world. With our fax service, you 
can print our fax number on your 
business card. 

VOICE MAIL 

Don't miss important calls. 

NOTARY 

Available during store hours. 




MAIL BOXES ETC 



a 



41 04 24th Street (at Castro) BUS (41 5) 824-1 070 
San Francisco, CA 94114 FAX (415) 824-1072 

Store Hours: Mon - Fri 9 - 6 Sat. 10-5 



UPS AUTHORIZED SHIPPING OUTLET 



YOU GOTTA SMOG IT! 

So Smog it Here and SAVE MONEY! 

$1395 



WE 
SAVE 



Plus $7 Certificate 




Reg. 

$27.50 Certificate 



f 

:k 



SMOG 
CHEC 

V 



DAN'S SMOG & AUTO SERVICE 
3865 24th St. 282-1552 





PROMISES, PROMISES! 

You promised you'd be in shape in the '80s 
but you weren't. So why not let us help you 
I do it in the '90s? 
If you want a body that's the best it will ever 
be, you won't get it working out alone or in 
a crowd. Meet with one of our trainers to 
put together a routine specifically designed 
for your body type. 

Here's the one resolution you won't have to 
make again next year. To find out how our 
personalized fitness program can work for 
you, talk to one of our trainers at 

(4 1 5) 355-26 1 4 

FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION 




Marke ts 

I I I I I I I 



Your 

fast ♦ fresh ♦ friendly 
place to shop! 

How may I help you San Francisco Noe Valley! 

Now, residents of Noe Valley will be able to 
experience a new way to shop! We at Bell Markets 
would like to invite you to visit your new upscale Bell 
Market. In your new store you'll be able to find: 

♦ Fast service, full service carryouts 

♦ Fresh U.S.D.A. choice meats and Colman Ranch 
Natural Meats 

♦ Fresh, smart choice produce with complete 
nutritional information 

♦ Friendly service with a smile! 

♦ Expanded gourmet foods and breads 

♦ Comprehensive selection of fine wines 

♦ Bulk, natural and health food sections 

♦ Bell Market Script Program 

If this sounds great, come visit us and say hello! 
Quality, 

Service and Selection, a timeless tradition since 1 96 1 . 

Sincerely, 

Your Bell Market Family 

3950 24th St. Son Francisco 
OPEN DAILY 
6 a.m. thru Midnight 







2» 



The Falling Leaves 
On Upper Market 



Photos by Ed Buryii 




Color Copies 

^IlMle^Firtate, or Art 



COLQRCRAME 
39573*tbst 

285-1387 * 




The coffee's on us 

Bring this coupon to any of our stores and receive a free 1 2 oz. cup 
of coffee with the purchase of any slice of cake. Select from 
Tricolor Mousse, Double Chocolate 
Cake, Truffle Torte, 
and much more. 
The choice is yours. 
Offer expires October 31, 1992 

Name 




Address 
City 



State 



Zip 



CocoUt Bakery 
Information Only 
(800) 262-6528 

Loa Gato* 

(408) 395-4562 

Palo Alto 
(415) 328-5548 

Coru Madera 
(415) 924-2353 

NW 



San Francuco 
Montgomery St 
(415) 788-5778 

Loa Alto* 
(415)949-4427 



San Francisco 
Fillmore St 
(415) 507-1223 

Berkeley 
(510) 843-3265 



Join The Coffee Club 

Ask a aalea person for details 



COCOL AT 



San Francisco 
24th Street 
(415) 647-3855 

Onnda 
(510) 254-7841 

Walnut Creek 
(510)935-6425 

Oakland 

(510)653-3676 



FINE CHOCOLATES AND 
EXTRAORDINARY DESSERTS 



Page 26 



The Nov valley vou e ■ uctooer ixy* 





A Streetcar Named Special: Noe Valley commuters had a chance to hop aboard an old trolley car and take a nostalgic non-graffiti- 
clouded ride down Church Street last month. PHOTO BY BEVERLY THARP 





DOC TRAINING 



One -on- one lessons 
m the doq*s own environment 
(home J or business) 



Bernie's 

PET 



SUPPLIES 



For Cats, Dogs. 
Small Animals, Fish 




Quality Bird Foods 



VITAMIN ENRICHED FOOD 

Fresh, high grade seed, 
grain and other natural 
Ingredients uniquely 
blended to satisfy each 
bird's nutriUonal needs 
Our exclusive vitamin 
and mineral coating 
provides the additional 
fortification of nutrients for 
optimal health 




1367 Valencia St. 

between 24th and 25th 
Close to 24th St. BART 

San Francisco, 
CA 94110 

(415) 550-2323 




SAVE 

$1.00 



B»i*»< Ria»»m rrxougn 
tOW Kiyvy MM* 

MtreuW c m»]i 0.'«C 10 
Klydy U*o» PfOOuOI 

pcbe.H earn c* 

9493' OOli 



Present coupon lor 
61.00 off your next 
purchase of any 
Sweet tUrreat Bird 
or Small Animal 
Food* or McBride* 
Bird Food. 



Manu'actu'**} Coupon 

NO £if»rat>C Out 





ALL PETS 

Daniel Hershberger, D.V.M. 




HOSPITAL 

269 South Van Ness Ave. 
Between Duboce & 14th St. 



Quality Medical, Surgical, 
And Dental Care 
For Your Pets 

By Appt.: Mon-Fri 8 am-6 pm 
Sat 8 am-12 Noon 

Also: 

* Low-cost Vaccine Clinic 
Sat 8-10 am 

* Bathing & Flea Control 

861-5725 



Pet Express 

■* SINCE 1968 



(415) 821-7111 



Boarding For pets In large indoor-outdoor runs. 
Special care for special pets. 

Grooming & flea control. All breeds. 

Cats too! Hot oil treatments! 

Shipping To move your pet across town. 

across the country or world. 

Gift Shop Quality pet foods, travel kennels. 

treats, toys, beds & accessories. 

Mandy & 

OFFICE HOURS: Mon - Fri 7-7 • Sat 9-6 • Sun. noon-4 
Come by & visit us at our new location 
1000 Iowa Street (Between 23rd & 25th) San Francisco. CA 94 




Clyde 



107 



The Noe Vallev Voic e ■ October IW2 



PaRC 27 



FLORENCE'S FAMILY ALBUfyJ 

Illustrated Reminiscences by Florence Holub 




When Superior Court beckons. 
San Francisco voters had 
better respond obediently, or 
else be prepared to plead a case of 
extreme hardship. 

I was first summoned for jury duty 
when my children were small, and on 
the third call I marched down to City 
Hall as mad as a hornet, demanding to 
know if they expected mc to leave my 
young sons unsupervised. The sympa- 
thetic clerk told me that he would take 
care of it, and he certainly must have, 
because I didn't hear from them again 
until last month. (My little ones are now 
middle-aged!) 

So on a recent Monday morning 1 got 
in line w ith a couple of hundred other 
potential jurors outside the jury assem- 
bly room, to be registered and assigned 
to a court. The Superior Court waiting 
room at City Hall has been greatly 
improved since my last visit, even 
boasting a television set to enhance the 
waiting. 

Eventually we were assigned to 
different groups, and each group was 
sent to one of the courts on the fourth 
floor. The groups were labeled by 
color — my group was "Rose," and the 
court of Judge Cahill was our destina- 
tion. I never made it into the jury box, 
however, because one of the lawyers 
quickly dismissed me for undisclosed 
reasons. 1 was sent home to be on 
telephone standby. 

Two days later 1 received a call. The 
leftover Roses (and Silvers, and a few 
other colors) were being directed to the 
court of Judge Carlos Bea. whose stock 
of jurors had been drained as one person 
after another asked to be excused. The 
case of the preceding days had just been 
settled out of court, but a class action 
asbestos suit was about to replace it. 
After a 3()-minute wait, we were told 
that this case had also been settled, but 
that another litigation would require our 
attention. 

The Madam County Clerk adminis- 
tered the oath "to tell the truth and 
nothing but the truth*' to everyone in the 
room. One well-dressed young man 
refused to do so, and when asked why. 




3EST COFFEE 
IN TOWN 

J»an ^FrnrriscD Cdhyrcmirlr 

QUESTION HAND, CONTi 

44 MONTGOMERY ST. 

IN THE BAITT/MDNI TUNNEL 
NEXT TO STAGECOACH RESTAURANT 
/DICE 433-5057 

S230 DIAMOND HEIGHTS BLVD. 

(DIAMOND HEIGHTS SHOEING CENTER) 
VOICE 647-6121 

950 BATTERT STREET 

BETWEEN VALLEJO AND GREEN 
VOICE *33 5949 



A View from The Jury Box 



responded by saying. "I deserve the 
right to give false and improper informa- 
tion." He was invited into the judge's 
chambers, along with a lady who had 
been holding a gurgling and cooing 
baby all morning. The rest of us took a 
break, and when we returned, the three 
of them were no longer among us. 

Because the new case was compli- 
cated and would last for an estimated 
three weeks, the judge took three hours 
to hear the many financial hardship 
pleas from potential jurors. While we 
waited, Frieda, another Rose person, 
and I decided to check out the other 
courtrooms. While doing so. we con- 
tinued our lively discussion concerning 
the pros and cons of jury duty. I felt that 
I was paying my dues to society, but 
Frieda, who had been called too often 
for her taste, complained that she was 
being overcharged and overworked. 

We postponed our debate as we 
explored, and discovered that all the 
courts looked the same except for two. 
which had original paintings on the 
wall. In Room 402, a brilliant modern 
abstraction in tones of red was an 
enlivening contrast to the staid and 
muted interior. 

Room 472 contained a large, somber, 
mysterious canvas that held our attention 
for a short time, but as we left, we were 
arrested by a second painting, belonging 
to the San Francisco Arts Commission, 
which depicted a larger-than-life, 
perfectly rendered likeness of a mounted 
policeman, and bore the signature of 
Noe Valley artist Mark Adams. 

We then decided to inspect the enor- 
mous excavation made to accommodate 
the new library on the other side of 
Civic Center plaza, and then to visit the 
old public library, where we could view 
the old-fashioned but poetic murals of 
another age, by Piazonni and Du Mond 

After that, we lunched leisurely at the 
cafeteria of the Hastings School of Law 
nearby, where contemporary art is also 
exhibited Here we found another 
creation by Mark Adams, this time in 
poster form — a Museum of Modern Art 
reproduction in rich reds titled 'A Bowl 
of Borscht," which made our mouths 
water. I was struck by Adams' versatility, 
as I recalled his magnificent tapestry, on 
exhibit a few months ago at the de Young 
Museum, which featured a large lotus. 

As we ambled back toward the court, 
we joined a spirited demonstration that 
was being held in the hope of restoring 



the state budget for programs for the 
disabled. We knew that voices of dem- 
onstrators often wafted through the 
courtrooms. A few days earlier, we had 
listened to the chanting of those fighting 
to save the jobs of the janitorial union. 
We also heard from another group 
chanting, "Free Mary Jane," in support 
of the little old lady who had been 
charged with baking cookies laced with 
marijuana, to ease the pain of the termi- 
nally ill. 

Before court can proceed, all of 
the prospective jurors must be 
questioned — first by the judge 
and then by all of the lawyers — to make 
sure that they will be impartial. Frieda, 
who was determined to wiggle out of 
the whole thing, used every ploy that 
she could muster. 

She raised her hand whenever a hint 
of an escape appeared. Seniors are 
exempt from jury duty, she ventured, 
only to be informed that this was com- 
pletely untrue. She was a lawyer's wife, 
she declared, and as such should be 
disqualified. Good try, but not so. 

And when the judge read off a list of 
witnesses and asked if anyone was 
acquainted with them or any of the 
lawyers, up shot Frieda's hand. Further 
questioning, however, revealed that the 
w itness had only sat on a panel of the 
book club that Frieda belonged to. 
Judge Bea asked her, "Do you think that 
I would believe that this could influence 
your judgment?" 

"1 was hoping so." Frieda blurted 
out. And everyone laughed at her hon- 
esty. 

On that same day. Frieda was placed 
on the alternate row, and I was bounced 
over her to a seat on the jury. As I sat 
there, one of the lawyers called out 
Frieda's name, saying, "Mrs. T. , I will 
excuse you because I think you have it 
coming to you!" Everyone roared again, 
but the happiest person was Frieda, 
who triumphantly strode out of the 
courtroom. 

We really missed her. but in the 
weeks that followed, we jurors who 
were thrown together almost at random 
turned out to be a friendly mixture. One 
young lady. Martha, lived in Noe Valley 
and read the Voice regularly, she said. 
Bill, who sat next to me. noticed my 
doodling and suggested the title for this 
article. 

Because of the surroundings, several 



Whiskers has a lot of love to 
i^ive - and he's free to an older 
person. 

The San Francisco SPCA Pets 
and Older People Program 
unites people over 60 with 
homeless pets, absolutely free 
of charge. 

And Whiskers' love conies 
with lots of great extras - 
like free medical care, free 
grooming, free obedience 
classes, iree supplies and 
more. 

An older person with 
time and love to share. 
A lifelong companion 
like Whiskers. The per- 
fect match. 



Fur mnrt' information, aintiu l 

The San Francisco SPCA 

2500 16th St San Francisco. CA 94103 415-554-3000 





of us recalled our impressions of the 
mayor during whose tenure our City 
Hall was built. While taking in the 
beautiful details of this tine civic build- 
ing, we couldn't help but note the large 
Roman letters at the base of the cupola: 
"JAMES ROLPH JUNIOR." who served 
from 1912 to 1931. 

Those years brought back fond 
memories to one couple on the jury. Al, 
who sat behind me. lived near the Civic 
Center as a boy He often sailed paper 
airplanes down into the City Hall 
rotunda, and he kept track of the 
mayor's schedule, so that he would be 
present whenever "Sunny Jim" entered 
or left his office, because this generous 
man had the habit of giving a quarter, 
which was a lot of money then, to any 
little boy he encountered. 

Little girls weren't neglected either. 
Another fellow juror, Jean, remembered 
how her father took her downtown so 
that she could meet the great man. She 
still remembers his smiling face 

And every day after jury dut\. as 1 
rode home on the J-car. 1 thought of 
what Helen Hughes Helfrich. my next- 
door neighbor for 25 years, had told me 
She enjoyed remembering her first trip 
on the J-lme after its completion. Her 
father took her. but it was Mayor Rolph 
who held her at the front of the car to 
the end of the line. Everyone loved 
"Sunny Jim." Noe Valley's favorite son! 
They just don't make mayors like that 
anymore. 

At the end of each day in court, the 
judge admonished us not to speak or 
communicate in any way concerning the 
case, at risk of prosecution! And my 
lips are still sealed. 

However. I think it is now permissible 
to mention that on more than one occa- 
sion, 1 heard a snore coming from 
someone seated behind me on the jury. 
Thank goodness for the interruption, 
though — it woke me up! □ 




Sea ^Breeze 
Cleaners 

824-5474 



Come visit us 
at 

1420 Castro Street 
between Jersey & 25th 

Professional Cleaners 
3 HOUR SERVICE 
We operate our own plant 

Try Our Coin-Op Laundry 
Featuring Speed Queen 
Washers & Dryers 



Coin-op 
Laundry 

Open Daily 
800-930 



Cleaners 

Mon-Fn 
7 30-6:00 
Sat 8 30-6 00 



n0 v nop V .1 1 1 e > 




thai ii oe " 



111 ^eni 



ELiSA S HEALTH SPA 

4026 24tti Street 
between Noe ana Castro) 
821-6727 

at T ubs • Sauna • Steamroom • Massage 



11 am -4 pm Daily 
$2 OFF HOT TUB 
with this ad 







Good Vibrations 

A clean, well-lighted place to duv 
vibrators, massage oils, books about 
sexuality and other tun things. Rent or 
buy from our carefully chosen 
selection ot erotic videos. 
1210 Valencia St., at 23rd 
Open everv day 1 1 a.m. - 7 p.m.. 
550-091 2 



Fine Corfees 
Teas • Oesserts 



Sun. 8 am-5 Dm 

415 337 9660 

2885 Diamond 
Street. SF. 94131 

Near Glen 
Park BART 





THE FRENCH 
TULIP 

European Flower Boutique 



3903 24th Street 
Noe Valley, SF CA 94114 
647-8661 



rene kone 




photography 

Weddings • €vents 
(415) 821-7369 



Hopwell's Restaurant 

Noe Valley's Finest and Oldest Restaurant 

Serving Breakfast & Lunch Daily • Sat. & Sun. Brunch All Day 



Try Our Original 3-Decker Clubs 
and Our Philly Cheese Steak Sandwiches 

Eggs Benedict Our Specialty 
Look for Our Daily Breakfast & Lunch Specials 
Mon.-Fri. 7:00am-3:00pm • Sat. 7:00am-3:30pm 
Sunday 7:00am-3:00pm 
4063 24th Street (between Castro & Noe) • 647-3016 
Owners Fred and Hvdi 



Diamond Heights Shopping Center 

5214 Diamond Heights Boulevard 

285-901 0 




Now Serving Lasagna and Pasta 

50% OFF PIZZA 

Buy One Pizza at our Regular Price and 
Receive 50% Off Second Pizza of equal or lesser value 

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday Only 
NO COUPON NECESSARY 

= FAST FREE DELIVERY = 



THEOSOPHY 

The United Lodge 

ot Theosophv 
FALL PROGRAM .. 



lit 

THEOSOPHY HALL 

lhb Sanchez Street 
• at Market) 

Call 861-6964 
or 928-5880 



1st INING 




See the 49ers on our 
Giant TV Screen 

Free Hot Dogs 

All Monday Night Football Games! 

Fabulous Halloween Party 
Saturday, October 3 I 
Prizes for Best Costumes 

We do Birthday Parties 

Coll for Informovon 

Friday & Saturday Live Music 

Noe Valley • 4026 24th St San Francisco 
821-6789 




S k i n C a 



r g 



fo 



the 90's 

deep pore cleansinq facials, 
make-ups, waxinq, 
eyebrow arcbinq, 
eop-piercinq, Imls, cosmetics. 
Full line of 
skin & body core products 

By appointment only 
(4)5) 285-4868 
U i I n • I i t Jo n 

P o t » i c i a G i r r i » 



664-9175 cm 233 
824-1533 Residence 

FRANCISCAN 
PROPERTI ES 




«0 fcl^lo Uo^rj 



Homage to the Hook and Ladder Society: In celebration of its 125th anniversary, the San Francisco Fire Department held a parade in Golden Gate Park Sept 27, featuring 120 
new and antique fire engines* such OS the horse-drawn apparatus shown above. PHOTO COURTESY Of- DOROTHY DEL NEGRO AND FAMILY. 



Friends of Not Valley 

Contact: Steve Roseman 

Answering machine number: 285-3532 

Mailing Address: 4444 24th St., 

San Francisco. CA 94114 

Meetings: Second Thursday of month. Noe 

Valley Library. 451 Jersey St.. 7:30p.m. 

East & West of Castro Street 
Improvement Club 

Contact: Paul Kantus. 647-3753 

Mailing Address: 492 Douglass St., 

San Francisco. CA 941 14 

Meetings hirst Wednesday of month. Room 

108. James Lick School. 1220 Noe St. . 8 p.m. 

Noe Valley Merchants and 
Professionals Association 

Contact: J. P. Gillen. 821-1515 

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 460574. 

San Francisco. CA 941 14 

Meetings: Last Wednesday of month. Bank 

of America. 24th and Castro. 9 a m 

Fair Oaks Neighbors 

Contact: Kevin Bnckley. 285-4938 
Mailing Address: 165 Fair Oaks St.. 
San Francisco. CA 941 10 
Meetings: Twice a year at ICA Auditorium. 
24th and Guerrero streets 



MORE GROUPS to Join 



Upper Noe Neighbors 

Contact: Janice Gcndreau. 641-5989 

Mailing Address: 403 2Xth St. . 

San Francisco. CA 94131 

Meetings: Every other month. Upper Noe 

Recreation Center, Day and Sanchez streets. 

7:30 p.m. Call for specifics. 

Duncan-Newburg Association 

Contact: Evelyn Martin. 826-6734. 
Janet Kennedy. 647-1844. or 
Deanna Mooney. 821-4045 
Mailing Address: 560 Duncan St.. 
San Francisco. CA 94131 
Meetings: Irregular 

Glen Park Association 

Contact: Joan Seiwald. 586-4448 
Mailing Address: Glen Park Association. 
P.O. Box 31292. San Francisco. CA 94131 
Meetings: Second Tuesday of month. Glen 
Park Recreation Center. Elk and Chenery, 
7:30 p.m. 



Noe Valley Democratic Club 

Contact: Rick Hauptman. 647-0549 
Mailing Address 1595 Noe St.. #6. 
San Francisco. CA 94131 
Meetings: Third Wednesday of month. Noe 
Valley Ministry. 1021 Sanchez St. . 7 p.m. 

Clipper Street SAFE Group 

Contact: Don Kern or Howard Johnson. 
821-3866. 

Mailing Address: 225 Clipper St. . 

San Francisco. CA 941 14 

Meetings: Third Tuesday ol month. Bethany 

Methodist Church. 201 Clipper St., 7 p.m. 

RAAGE (Race Awareness Arbitration 
Group Education) 

Contact: Donna Bervinchak. 282-4742 
Mailing Address: c/o Noe Valley Ministry. 
1021 Sanchez St., San Francisco. CA 941 14 
Meetings: Tuesdays. Noe Valley Ministry, 
102 1 Sanchez St .' 7 : 30 p . m . Call to confirm 



Libert> -Hill Neighborhood 
Association 

Contact: John Barbey. 695-0990. or 
Hilda Bernstein. 282-8232 
Mailing Address: 3333 21st St.. 
San Francisco. CA 941 10 
Meetings: Quarterly. 
Call for time and location. 

Fairmount Neighborhood Association 

Contact: Al Ujcic. 648-3545. or 

Susan Nutter. 285-8484 

Mailing Address 78 Harper St.. 

San Francisco. CA 94131 

Meetings: Held periodically at Upper Noe 

Recreation Center. Day and Sanchez. 7 p.m. 

Diamond Heights Community 
Association 

Contact: Robert Dockendorff. 826-3867 
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 31529. 
San Francisco. CA 94131 
Meetings: First Thursday of the month. 
7:30 p.m. Call for location. 

Dolores Heights Improvement Club 

Contact: Bruce Muncil. 864-7847 
Mailing Address: 336 Cumberland St.. 
San Francisco. CA 941 14 
Meetings: Irregular 



'Such Succulent Sushi — Fresh From the Sea" 

*** Patricia Unterman, San Francisco Chronicle 



HAMANO SUSHI 



SUSHI BAR AND JAPANESE RESTAURANT 



The City's first choice for 
great sushi and Japanese dining 



Open 7 days a week 

1332 Castro Street (at 24th Street) 826-0825 



Shooting the 
Breeze on 
24th Street 



THF. FACE OF DOWNTOWN NOE VALLEY 
always seems to be changing, but the 
sensory experience of strolling down 
Main Street has remained virtually the 
same tor the past 15 years. 

Little Italy, at 24th near Castro, still 
fills your nose with waiting garlic, just 
like the it did when it opened in the late 
"70s. Common Scents, a block away, has 
those delightful fragrances spilling out 
the door. And what about the "'who-cut- 
the-cheese" effect you get when passing 
by the 24th Street Cheese Company, an- 
other institution in the neighborhood. 

As for the sound effects, there's the 
boisterous chatter emanating from 24th 
Street's many venerable pubs, and the 
slurping of foam outside the coffee em- 
poriums — which is only occasionally 
drowned out by the roar of internal com- 
bustion engines going to and fro. 

Then there's the daily screeching of 
the pneumatic drills at Noe Valley Auto 
Works and at Dan's Gas (here since the 
early 1930s, when it was called McCar- 
thy's Service Station). 

Your eyes can be widened by the 
dramatic window displays in stores like 
Joshua Simon or Out of Hand, or zapped 
back to the future in the case of Star 
Magic, which currently sports a static- 
filled video monitor. 

Or, if you want a real blast from the 
past, you can squint in the window of 
Twin Peaks Properties. Harry Aleo's real- 
ty office nearby. He's got that 1955 
Brooklyn Dodgers championship. photo 
in the window, and all those yellowed 
Reagan and Bush newspaper clippings. 
And. yes. the place is still offering a 
"free" bumpersticker advising us not to 
buy cars from Japan. Sorry, Harry, we 
already have. 



and now 

for 

the 



RUMORS 

BY MAZOOK 



behind 
the 
news 



And there have been other ch-ch-ch- 
changes as well. 

S 2? S 

RAPID DEVELOPMENTS: Some Fotomat 
customers who dropped off their film at 
the chain's 24th Street store for proces- 
sing in July may have been surprised to 
return in August and see the word "Rit/" 
masking the old Fotomat logo. 

Well, according to former Fotomat and 
now Rit/ store manager Barbara Smith, 
the RitZ Camera chain (over 700 stores 
nationwide) bought up Fotomat's 24 stores 
in California Aug. 2. "Not to worry." 
says Smith. "Everyone with the Fotomat 
'preferred' customer cards can freely ex- 
change them for Ritz cards and continue 
to get double prints or a replacement roll 
of film, or now a 10 percent discount." 

In other commercial drift. Prado Gal- 
lery has moved out of the Noe Valley 
Mall and into the basement below De- 
signers' Club Too at the corner of 24th 
and Sanchez. And Prado owner Hector 
Sabates couldn't be happier: "This is a 
much bigger and better space for me to 
do framing work in, and I am going to 
expand my selection of cards and original 
works of art." 

Over on 24th above Castro, Mail Box- 
es Etc. has expanded its operation next- 
door, into the adjoining storefront that 
was vacated by Underwater Pets this 
summer. For those of you who prefer to 
get your mail at midnight, store owners 
John Lee and Ken Tom point out that the 
shop's original space will be devoted en- 
tirely to private mailboxes (around 300), 
which can be accessed 24 hours a day. 
Small boxes, by the way, run about 90 
bucks a year. 

The Meat Market Coffeehouse, a land- 
mark on 24th Street since 1971, is now 



Quality Fast Service 
at Low, Low Prices 



BENDIX 

BRAKES 

Special from 

$47 9S * 

Front or rear 
Pads & shoes 
Guaranteed for life! 

1 . Free brake inspection 

2. Install new Bendix pads 
or heavy duty shoes* 

3. Repack wheel bearings 

4. Anti-squeak treatment 

5. Road Test 

* Bendix Brakes with lifetime guarantee 




CLUTCH 

Special from 

$247 95 * 

Guaranteed 



2 yr.,20,000 miles on parts 
1 yr., 12,000 miles on labor 

• Front wheel drive included 

• New factory parts for 
imports and most 
domestics (not rebuilt) 

• Free lifetime service 
adjustment 

1 . Pressure Plate 

2. Clutch Disc 

3. Throw out Bearing 

4. Pilot Bearing 



Discount Brake & Clutch 

740 Valencia Street (between 18th and 19th) 
43 1 -9400 M-F 7:30 - 7:00 • SAT 8:00 - 6:00 

^^SS^SiSSS^ IS 252! 2££! fle,a,ls Mosl M,s and "° hl ,ruck$ ***** we oo not 
*toto™^MZZ2L^TT* ad<mional par1s and labor may be needed 10 comple,e ,he ,epaif Cost ™y 

oe suostantial. We perform the highest quality service at the lowest possible price 



SMOG IN SPECTION 

I \J for cert 



Plus we will beat any 
advertised price lower than 



ours bv 12.00 



FREE RETEST WHILE-U-WAIT 
WHEN WORK _IS DONE HERE. 

LUBE, OIL& FILTER "1 

J 19 9S •il^&i'ss 

_ _ _ • Ch^\r2umuld_Level$ 

' TUNE UP & SERVICE "1 
$^795 47.95 6eyl. | 

J#4crt. 57.95 8cVL 



Smog Stop 

4199 Mission St. 
334-7664 
3 Blocks from Silver 
M-F 8-6:30 & 8-5 



Discount Smog & 
Lube 

3300 Army Street 
647-7665 
Olympic Cas at S. Van Ness 
M-F 8-6:30 & SAT 8-5 



under new ownership. Dia Elkhuri and 
Manhal Jweinat have bought the plaec, 
and say they plan to increase the cafe's 
hours (7 a.m. to 7 p.m.). expand the 
breakfast menu to include eggs and 
omelettes, and reduce the price on some 
existing food items. 

Both Dia and Manhal live in Glen Park, 
and Manhal also owns and operates the 
Higher Grounds Coffee House on Chen- 
ery near Diamond. 

Another coffeehouse will be opening 
soon, in the spot last occupied (over three 
years ago) by Taste of Honey, at 24th and 
Diamond. The eatery, to be called, appro- 
priately enough, the Diamond Corner 
Cafe, is a new venture for Karin Hoehne, 
who says she plans to get the place open 
by mid-October. 

In an unrelated item, the Taste of Hon- 
ey sign has finally been removed from 
the 1515 Church St. storefront, where it 
had hung for a couple of years after the 
sweet shop left 24th and Diamond. 

In its place will be a gift and flower 
shop called Lily of the Valley, the newest 
enterprise of Dianne Clohessy. Dianne is 
the Dianne in Mia and Dianne's Flowers 
& Gifts, the popular flower emporium 
that bloomed, until recently, across the 
street at 1478 Church. 

The other half of the former partner- 
ship, Mia Hatakeyama, says she also 
plans to open another flower stand "in 
the neighborhood, hopefully on Church 
Street." Mia started selling flowers on 
the sidewalk at 27th and Church (where 
Eric's is now) in March of '91, and then 
went into business with Dianne in No- 
vember. The two decided to go their sep- 
arate ways this summer, however, "be- 
cause our management styles were so 
different." Mia says. 

Steve Carrozzi. who used to chef at 



Noes Grill at 24th and Church, wants his 
friends in Noe Valley to know he recently 
opened a similar place at 4704 Mission 
St. (near Ocean) called Carrozzi's Saute 
City. Check it out. 

& S S 

BLUES ON 24TH: The Courtyard Cafe, 
in front of the Noe Valley Mall at 24th 
and Sanchez, has lost this year's bid for 
a cabaret license. 

At a Sept. 17 hearing of the Planning 
Commission, about 30 Courtyard sup- 
porters tried to convince the city that 
music, poetry readings, improvisational 
comedy, and non-amplified acoustic mu- 
sic would be a welcome addition to the 
commercial strip, but they were coun- 
tered by 15 neighbors, who came armed 
with a protest petition signed by many 
more. 

The commission voted 4 to 2 to deny 
the Courtyard's application. (It was 6 to 
zip last time, so the Courtyard's chances 
seem to be improving year by year.) 

John Stalp, chair of Friends of Noe Val- 
ley's planning committee, reports that 
he's been going bonkers over the city's 
ineptness when it comes to installing 
trash cans on 24th Street. 

Last spring the Friends won a $2,640 
Neighborhood Beautification grant, to be 
used for 10 new heavy-duty trash recepta- 
cles in Downtown Noe Valley. To order 
the containers, they sent a list of their 
proposed locations and a $2,000 down- 
payment to the Department of Public 
Works, which was supposed to deliver 
and install them. 

In June, the group learned that DPW 
had "lost" the request, so Friends 
stopped payment on the check, prepared 
a new request, location list, and check, 
and mailed it off. 

Three months later, still no cans in 
sight — so Stalp got on the phone. Well, 
it seems that through some sort of ad- 
ministrative bungling. DPW had neglect- 
ed to order the cans and had decided to 
put the money to another use. "What!?" 



Low rates 
make State Farm 
homeowners 
insurance a good buy. 

Our service makes it even better. 
Call me. 
MELANIE MARKS, AGENT 

Office: (415) 333-9411 

301 Chenery Street 
San Francisco, CA 94131 



STATf FARM 
•NSURANCt 



See GiantVision on our Large 8 x 10 Screen 
The Only Pub on Dolores Street 

O'Greenberg's 
Pub 




1600 Dolores St. (at the corner of 29th and Dolores) 550-9192 



The Noe Vallev Voice > October 1992 



RUMORS 



said Stalp. who immediately went down 
10 the bank to stop payment on the second 
check. 

Though much bothered and beleaguered. 
Stalp says he and his Friends will try yet 
a third time to get what they paid for. 
And maybe a few extra cans, for all the 
red tape. 

S S S 

TOP OF THE POPS: The best-selling fiction 
at Cover to Cover bookstore these days 
is Susan Sontag's Volcano Lover. On the 
non-fiction side, it's Women Who Run 
with the Wolves, by Clarissa Pmkola Estes. 

According to Roger Weiss at Street- 
light Records, your current musical pref- 
erences are Dirty Rock 'n' Roll, a CD by 
Sonic Youth: a new album of pop ballads 
and torch songs by Annie Lennox; and 
Ottmar Liebert's Luna Negra, catering to 
the New Age crowd. 

Over at Aquarius Records, the top sell- 
er, says store employee Windy C. is a CD 
called Brand New Heavies, consisting of 
10 different rappers backed by a British 
band. Also big is the S.F. group Star 
Pimp, who've put out a hot single called 
"Treasure Trail." 

The top movie rental around the Valley 
last month was Fried Green Tomatoes, at 
both West Coast Video on Church and 
24th, and Video Wave on Castro. For the 
younger set, the current rage is Fern 
Gully — the Last Rain Forest, an ani- 
mated film with an environmental theme. 

But for something off the beaten track. 
Video Wave owner Alexander Gardener 
suggests Strangers in Good Company, a 
movie from the Canadian Film Board. 
"It's just wonderful." he says. 

Video Wave is also renting, for free, 
Time Out. the new AIDS awareness 
video produced by Arsenio Hall and Ma- 
gic Johnson. Says Gardener, "We are giv- 
ing McAteer High School a free copy for 




Page 31 



S S S" 

HAPPY TRAILS TO YOU until we meet 
again. And it is my sincere hope that that 
will be on the occasion of the Neighbor- 
hood Party, Oct. II. 11:30 to 5:30, at 
Upper Noe Rcc Center. Sanchez and Day 
Get ready to boogie on down, because 
the show should be hot, there arc crafts 
to be got. and the food ... a lot □ 



On Your Way to the Forums: Karen Pierce, president of the Bayview-Hunters Point 
Democratic Club, wore the grtntp'S message on her sleeve at a cilywide candidates forum held 
Sept 1 2 at James Lick Middle School. This month James Lick will host another pre-election 
gathering, one spotlighting candidates for school hoard and tackling the BEST agenda 
I Bringing Education and Services Together So All Children Can Excel). The all -day forum will 
take place Oct. 10, and will feature an appearance by State Assembly Speaker Willie Brown. 
Call 431-7430 for details, photo by TOM WACHS 



their use, and also making the tape avail- 
able for viewing to any class at James 
Lick Middle School upon request." 

S S S 

ZIPPY FOR PRESIDENT posters do not 
appear to be going up in Noe Valley win- 
dows this election year, perhaps due to 
the fact that residents finally have a 
choice and are plastering the neighbor- 
hood with Clinton-Gore signs. 

According to Clinton volunteers Robin 
Bach, of Elizabeth Street , and Sylvia and 
Tom Saunders, who live on 21st Street, 
Noe Valleons have been flocking to the 
table they've set up on 24th Street every 
Saturday since August. "A lot of people 
have been registering to vote over the 
past two months," says Tom, "many who 
have recently moved into the neighbor- 
hood and others who are first-time voters 
just turning 18." 





Since 1982, your caring 

NEIGHBORHOOD DENTIST 

• Nitrous Oxide and Stereo Headphones 

• Preventive Care 

• Sealants 

• Cosmetic Bonding 

• White Fillings 



641-8900 

Glen S. Belen, D.D.S. 
3208 Mission Street 

Member: ADA, CD A, SFDS 





DENTAL EXAM 




AND CLEANING 




<tQC Regularly 
\J)00 $80 


4 


Complete oral exam 




X-rays as needed 




Teeth cleaned 




and polished 




Please, new patients only 
EXPIRES 10/31/92 



And contributions have been pretty 
good, too. "We have been averaging al- 
most $500 a Saturday, and registering 
nearly 50 people each afternoon we're 
out here." 

The deadline to register to vote, by the 
way. is Oct. 6 (call 554-4375). 

And while Zippy may not make it to 
the White House, Zippy campaign man- 
ager and artistic creator Bill Griffith says 
the Zipster may get his own half-hour 
TV series next year. 

According to Bill, Randy Quaid has 
been lined up to star in this live-action- 
with-animation exploration of the world 
as seen through the Pinhead's pinhead. 
"It's going to be kinda like MTV's Sun- 
day night 'Liquid Television' program." 

At the end of October, Griffith will be 
flying back to Boston to be inducted into 
Harvard University's Lampoon Society. 



GET 

THE 
VOTE 



POLL WORKERS NEEDED IN 
SAN FRANCISCO! 

November 3, 1992 is the 
Presidential Election. The 
Registrar of Voters needs poll 
workers with basic reading, 
writing, alphabetizing and math 
skills. The day begins at 6:30 a.m. 
and ends at approximately 9:30 
p.m. Poll Workers get $62 for the 
day. It is an opportunity to meet 
your neighbors and participate in 
the democratic process. For more 
information, contact Juanita 
Mitchell at 554-4385, or stop by 
Room 158 of City Hall. 



Have you J is covered 

SURIYA? 




Serving Unique and Traditional 1 liai Cuisine 

"...excellent, clean-tasting an J handsomely prepared food... 

a great find. Janet 1 la/en, Bay Guardian 

"...a complete dining out experience. . .don t miss chicken wrapped 
in banana leaves. " Patricia I Internum, SF Chronicle Datebook 



Luncli Tues.-Fri. 11 -2:30 
Dinner Tues.— Sun. 5 — 10 pm 
Take-out ♦ Catering 



1432 Valencia St. 

(between 25th & 26th) 

824-6055 

Reservations Accepted 



VISIT THE TRAVEL PROFESSIONALS AT 

GLOBAL 
TRAVEL 
TOO 

Book with Global. . . Because We Care! 




Downtown 

1 Hallidie Plaza 
Suite 406 
M-F 9-6 
705-7878 



Noe Valley 

4005 24th St. 
(at Noe) 

M-F 9-6 Sat 10-5 
647-4304 



Russian Hill 

2230 Polk St HQ /T££ 

M-F *°Sat 1 0-5 AIRL,NES # AMTRACK • HOTELS • CHARTERS 

776-5300 TOURS • DISCOUNT CRUISES • EURAILPASS 



Haight 

1697 Haight St 
(at Cole) 

M-F 9-6 Sat 10-5 
431-6204 

Polk/Gulch 

1322 Polk St 
(at Bush) 

M-F 9-6 Sat 1 0-5 
567-7556 



Page 32 




Work 
part time. 

Earn 
full time. 

Set your own hours. Earn 
exciting results sharing 
Shaklee Nature-inspired 
products. Learn about 
the Bonus Car and conven- 
tion travel opportunities. 
For an appointment, call: 



Shaklee 



In dmm ralBwi 

ii..', ilmliir 



Tracy Ewing 
(415) 756-5538 




SHANTA 

CARPENTRY 
& CONSTRUCTION 

In business for 17 years 



a. 
a. 



kitchens I baths 
elec I plumbi 
remodeling 



nng 



additions 
repair I dry rot 
Victorian restor. 

Lie No. 442870 



foundation lo finish 



821-4091 



BODY THERAPY 

for Women 

Using deep gentle touch, body 
meditations & play. 
For pain relief & to release 
limiting postures & patterns. 
Regain feeling, movement & joy, 
safely throughout your body. 

Private sessions, groups and 
workshops. 

Cress Forester \ 
(415) 826.2135 ^ 




a 



a small business consultancy 
in Noe Valley 

The Lawrence 

Company 




making business 
pleasurable as well as 
profitable 



varied & comprehensive services 
tailored for the small- and medium- 
sized company 

improved paperwork & 
cash flow systems 
sales training & marketing 
small business management 
experience includes working 
with building tradespeople, 
medical professionals, retailers 
& small manufacturers 

415 282 6053 




(415) 648-2609 



LICENSE NO. 479313 
BONDED 



Affordable Rates 

243 Chenery Street 
San Francisco, CA 94131 



SUBARU • TOYOTA • NISSAN • MAZDA • VW • HONDA 



Complete Domestic & Foreign Car Service & Repair 
Tires • Alignments • Brakes • Shocks • Suspension 
Mon-Fri 7:30-5:30 • Call for Appointment 



550-2400 



r 

k 





Lunch and Dinner 



Haystack Pizza Restaurant 

Open from 11 30 am daily • 7 days a week 

3881 24th Street, San Francisco 





PASTA 
VEAL 
CHICKEN 
STEAK 
SEAFOOD 



HAYSTACK 20™ 
ANNIVERSARY 
CELEBRATION SPECIAL 

$2. OFF 
Complete Dinners 
Pay a la carte price 

(applies to all members of your parly) 
Inside Dining Only 
Give Waitress this Coupon 

Expires Nov. 30, 1992 




ALISON WAHL 

PERSONAL FITNESS TRAINING 

(415) 442-7903 



"HOW TO LIVE IN YOUR BODY" 

Movement and Meditation Classes 
Experience moving from the inside out! 




In an easy going, nurturing environment, be 
with yourself for two hours each week learning 
to focus attention inward, experiencing and 
expressing your own inner movement 

STRETCHING, practical, easy-to-do warm-ups 
SENSING the inner experience oi slow, guided 
movement 

MEDITAT1NC on the worlds of sensation inside 
your slun 

FREEING yourself to move as you really long to move 

Feeling the pleasure ami power of living your body! 
Wednesday Evenings 7-9 
On-going 4-week classes— $60 

Call Ann McCinnis.CMT (Certified M«»uge Therapist) 
641-9973 

I Alto private bodvuvrk vstiom f>v appointment i 




BARBER SHOP 

Since 1956 
Open Monday - Saturday 

9 am - 6 pm 
Wednesday 9 am - 7 pm 
Closed Sundays 

for art appointment call 

Mike, Stephanie 
or Jerry 

282-8445 

1185 CHURCH ST. 

CLOSED SUNDAYS 




SchweD 

■CONSTRUCTION- 



"A Noe Valley Builder" 



(415) 285-2160 



Alex Schwed 
General Contractor 
State Lie. No. 579875 




The Xoc Vollcv \»,< , • Oetohet W2 



Page 33 



i 



Bar & Excellent Chinese Cuisine 



Open 7 Days 
From 11 :00 am -11 :00 pm 



Food To Go 
Pick-up or Free 
Fast & Hot Delivery 



i 



Please Call 
282-6688 - 282-6800 

3945 24th Street 
San Francisco, CA 94114 



QUAKEBUSTERS 



We've told you once, we've told you twice, now on the anniversary ol the Loma Pneta earthquake 
(Oct. 17, 1989), we'll tell you once again: you better get ready. The Big One may be lurking. 
Here s what the California Office of Emergency Services says every San Francisco home needs 



A Fire Extinguisher 

Your fire extinguisher 
should be suitable 
lor all types of tires 
.md should be easily 
accessible 




W rench 

Have a crescent or 
pipe wrench on 
hand to turn oi l lms 
and water valves. 




Water. Disinfectant 

Store several gallons 
of water for each 
person, plus a 
disinlectant like 
chlorine bleach to 
purih u 




First-Aid kit 

The kit should be in 
a central location 
and should include a 
list of emergency 
instructions. 




Flashlight 

Keep flashlights 
(and extra batteries! 
tn several locations 
in case of a power 
lailure 




Blankets, Clothing 

Extra blankets 
and clothing may be 
necessary to keep 
warm, and a sturd\ 
pair ol shoes is 
always a phis 





Radio and Batteries 

Transistor radios 
will be useful for 
receiving emergency 
broadcasts and 
current disaster 
inlormation. 



Dry or Canned 
Food. Money 

Store a week's 
suppK ol food tor 
each person Also, 
stash some cash and 
some quarters lor 
the pay phones 




Conking Source 

Store barbecue, 
charcoal, starter, and 
matches, in case 
the city's utilities 
are out of service. 



ILLUSTRATIONS H> KAROl BAKSkl 




J\ 


^ 




Hai* Studio 


Bi 



We Are Now 
Better Than Ever 




OPEN 7 DAYS AND EVENINGS 
FOR ALL YOU HAIRCARE AND 
BEAUTY SUPPLY NEEDS 

3836 24TH ST. • NOE VALLEY 
641-8948 

VTSA 

We Bring out the Best in You' 





Mickey case with 
every Disney frame 



Back to School 

with quality eyewear from the 

( haracter Collection by fljQftCfi9fc_ 



available at 




OPTICAL 

* ■ ■ 

HEARING 



VASQUEZ OPTICAL & HEARING 

1309 Castro at 24th St. 

Next to Walgreens 

(415) 206-2080 



SERVING ALL YOUR 
HOUSING NEEDS 




695-7707 

Noe Valley 
384 1 -24 tb Street 




552-9500 

Upper Market 
4200- 17th Street 



ZEPHYR 

THE FIRST LETTER IN REAL ESTATE 

Any child mndtt 12 can enter drawings which may he showcased in our ads. Call for details. 





The Noe Vallev Voice ' October iwz 




MORE 

MOUTHS 

•to feed* 



B\ Jane Underwood 



At 8 months, baby Alex is already upstaging his theatrical parents Chri s and Jane Morreale. 
PHOTO BY TOM WACHS 



Alexander Jerome Morreale 

The moment of Alexander Jerome Mor- 
reale's birth— Jan. 7. 1992. at 6:08 
p.m. — "was the most amazing thing I 
ever saw," says his dad, Chris Morreale. 

Little Alex, who weighed 5 pounds, 4 
ounces, came a month early, maybe be- 
cause he was so eager to get the show on 
the road, says his mom, Jane Morreale. 
"He's a very happy kid." she explains. 
"This may sound biased, but everyone 
we meet says, 'Oh, he smiles so much, 
he's so carefree.' He's a flirt, basically " 

Alex also has "no fear of strangers or 
dogs," she adds, which is good, given 
that Sherman, the Morreales' Doberman. 
weighs 105 pounds. "Alex can just watch 
Sherman lor hours." says Chris. "In tact, 
he gets upset if Sherman leaves the room, 
like, how dare you go out of my line of 
vision? 

"He really loves his Johnny lumper in 
the doorway, too, but he wants Sherman 
to be nearby when he's in it. so he can 
reach out and pull at his face. It's really 
a sight to see. Everybody gets a kick out 
of it." 

"Little babies, they're so cute." says 
Jane, who has 12 nieces and nephews, 
and comes from a family of seven kids. 
"He's got some hair now, and a big fat 
belly and sort of a dimple in his cheek, 
but no teeth yet." 

"I'm amazed at what Jane knows about 
raising babies," says Chris, who was 



brought up in Brooklyn, N Y. "She went 
into this whole thing extremely prepared, 
maybe because she grew up on a farm, 
in a little Iowa town of 300, and has been 
raising babies all her life!" 

"Having a dog is good preparation, too." 
Jane laughs "You can't just pick up and 
go away for the weekend when you have 
animals!" 

"Friends said, 'Look out. your life is 
going to be over,'" Chris remembers. 
"But it's really not that horrible. Just hav- 
ing him around and looking at him is 
enough to make up for the hard parts ." 

And. he adds, "There are always baby- 
sitters. We go out once a week." 

The Morreales especially like to check 
out the theater scene, since they both 
work in the field. Chris. 31, is a technical 
director at the Berkeley Repertory Thea- 
ter, and Jane. 30. is the assistant manager 
of the costume shop at the American 
Conservatory Theater. They first met 
when they were both working at a theater 
in Minneapolis. 

"We went to an opening night party," 
recalls Jane. "It was a sort of non-com- 
mittal date, you know, an Tll-see-you- 
there-yeah-that'll-be-great' kind of date." 

But the budding attraction turned into 
"a mutual thing," says Chris. Four years 
later, in 1988. they got married. 

In 1990 they moved to San Francisco 
and ended up on 28th Street in Noe Val- 
ley. There they set the stage for Alex, and 
the curtain has now gone up — to great 
applause. □ 



MORE MOUTHS TO FEED wants to 
show off your newest family member. If 
you have a new baby in residence or you 
just adopted a teenager, please send your 
announcement to the Noe Valley Voice. 
More Mouths to Feed. 1021 Sanchez St.. 
San Francisco. CA 941 14. Don't forget to 
include your address and phone number, 
so we can contact you to arrange for the 
family portrait. □ 



Children's 
Day School 

333 Dolores Street 

San Francisco. CA 94110 



A progressive Montessori school 
located on a one-acre oasis in 
the heart ol the San Francisco Sunbelt, 
designed lor the development of 
the total child, ages 2-7. 

Day School 8 30 - 2 30 
Extended Care 7 30 -8:15/ 2:30 - 6:00 

861-5432 



O □ A 

Bean Sprouts 



featuring 100% cotton clothing for 
children • shoes, toys and 
other accessories for children. 

Maternity, too. 
Japanese Weekend and other 100% 
cotton clothes for moms-to-be. 

3961A 24th St SFCA 94114 415 5501668 

M-S 10:30-6:30 Sun 11-5 



WE WANT YOUR STUFF! 

To recycle into children's artwork 
and community projects 

S.C.R.A.P. 

(Scrounger's Center for Reusable Art Parts) 

We need your clean reusable materials, including: 

Paper Leather Rubber Foam Core Tubing 
Fabric Tile Yarn Pens Wire 

Wood Buttons Frames Mylar Paint 

Bring your stuff to the drop-off box in the lobby of 
Sunshine High School 

2730 Bryant Street (&25th street) Call us at 647- 1 746 



PRIVATE MATH TUTORING 



Pre-Algebra Algebra Geometry SAT 
GRE Trigonometry Calculus Physics 

Don't Wait to Make the Grade 



MATHCON (415) 647-5626 





v 



PRE-SCHOOL 

Ages 2-6 Years 

• A safe, healthy, and fun environment in which 
your child can grow and develop. 

• Planned activities structured so that your 
child will learn skills to better prepare him/her 
for Kindergarten 

• An experienced and dedicated staff eager to 
provide vour child with both educational and 
outdoor activities that are appropriate for your 
child's age. 

F nil and half-day programs available 
Mornings 8:0(1 - 12:00 Afternoons 1:00 - 5:00 
Full Days 8:00 - 5 30 
Minimum 2 Day* per Week 
39 Whitney, San Francisco 94131 
(415) 821-9070 



n PARTIES 
CLOWAJ/M^ 
&/\LL00M5 
FACG" PAlttfltiCi 
MU51C 

DISCOUNTS I 
CALL fc0fp-R(p5 






Every disposable diaper 
ever used by every baby 
in the world since the 
very first one was ever 
sold (1963) still exists 
somewhere on this 
planet. That's something 
to think about. 

DyDee Wash supplies 
soft natural cotton 
diapers — comfortable, 
affordable, reusable/ 
recyclable for your baby 
and your baby*s future. 

761-4445 
Cotton Diaper Service 





DY*DEE 

J WA H 



The Noe Valley Voice ■ October 1992 



Page 35 



MORE 

MOUTHS 

•to feed • 




By Jane Under w ood 



Shayna Dorothy Rubin 

On the evening of March 3, 1992, San- 
chez Street residents Roger Rubin and 
Renee Koury both arrived home from 
work. beat. 

Roger, 46. runs his own law practice 
(when he isn't writing his "Rumors" col- 
umn tor the Voice), and Renee. 36, is a 
reporter tor the San Jose Mercury New s 

On the night in question, they konked 
out on the couch together, and at around 
I a.m. Renee woke up and informed 
Roger that she was in labor, two weeks 
early. 

"We had nothing packed yet." Roger 
recollects, "so I ran down to the basement 
in my underwear to get her suitcase, then 
ran back up and started racing around the 
house trying to find my pants. When I 
finally found them, my biggest problem 
was getting both feet in.'* 

Renee wasn't exactly calm, either. She 
gave up on getting appropriately dressed, 
and threw on a raincoat. Says Roger. "We 
both ran like chickens out to the car. I put 
on my flashing blinkers, went through 
several red lights, and made it to U.C. 
Berkeley in, oh, six minutes." 

"Then," remembers Renee. "we paced 
the halls for three hours, waiting while 
they did all the tests to see if I was in 
labor." 

Well, she was indeed in labor, and just 
two hours after being admitted to the 
hospital — at 7:50 a.m. March 4, to be 
exact — she gave birth to 5-pound. 14- 
ounce Shayna Dorothy Rubin (aka Bood- 
gie. Moodgie. Dzadza. and Puhpuh). 

Shayna was born with a luxurious head 
of dark brown hair, and huge brown eyes 
framed by thick lashes. "Everyone said 
her hair would fall out. but it never did." 
notes Renee. "And it has been a big chal- 
lenge for Mommy, trying to keep it clean. 
They don't like you to wash their hair, 
but fuzz gets in it. and milk gets on that, 
and it looks like glue!" 

Shayna. resplendent in a hot pink dress 
and color-coordinated leggings and socks, 
is sitting in Mommy's lap during the inter- 
view, chewing on a business card from 
Small Frys kids' clothing store. 

"She eats anything," Renee points out. 



"but she loves paper, especially news- 
papers. The challenge is to try to let her 
play with it without eating it." 

"She's a bright and smiley baby." Roger 
chimes in "And doesn't she look like an 
old soul.' If you look deeply into her 
eyes. . . ." 

Clearly the doting dad. Roger relates 
how. for the first four months of Shay na's 
lite, he and Renee fbjind some creative 
ways to deal with colic. "We'd calm her 
down with dancing." he explains. "Bryan 
Ferry's 'Don't Stop the Dance" was her 
favorite." 

The colic may have been related to 
Shayna's premature birth. "They said her 
nervous system was overstimulated." says 
Renee. "She was aware of too much, too 
young. Most babies just kind of hang out. 
but she was reaching lor her toys at six 
weeks, and she knew who we were at two 
months and wouldn't let other people han- 
dle her." 

But Shayna's early awareness has had 
its advantages, too. "She's already started 
drinking out of a glass," Renee says. 

"And she held her own bottle at three 
months." notes Roger. "And she has just 
finished reading War and Peace." 

Probably the biggest surprise about fa- 
therhood. Roger observes, "is how close 
I feel to my baby. That, and how much 
you don't know about children until you 
have one of your own. It's like joining the 
club. Then you gain respect for all the 
parents you couldn't relate to before. And. 
of course, you can't do anything anymore!" 

"But that doesn't bother me." Renee 
says. "You don't want to do the old things, 
anyway. I don't miss my old life like I 
thought I would." 

The couple first met in 1978 at the Jew- 
ish Community Center, where they were 
both swimming laps. "He asked me what 
time it was on the clock on the wall." 
recalls Renee. 

"And she said. There is no clock.'" 
admits Roger, who apparently can't see 
too well without his glasses "There were 
just some wires sticking out of the wall 
where the clock was supposed to be." 

Thus the two were mutually smitten, 
and went out for coffee together at the 
Cafe Trieste on their first date, then to the 
Grant Street Fair. Fourteen years later, 
they're happily arguing over how to 
change diapers — and planning to pro- 
duce a sibling for Shayna sometime soon. 

"I've never loved anybody like I love 
Shayna," says Renee. "I'd do anything 
for this little person." 

"The baby just made us that much clos- 
er," adds Roger. "We thought we were as 
close as you could be." agrees Renee. 
"until she came." □ 




We hope you won't be too scared to enter the 

Second Annual Jack'o'Lantern 
Carving Contest at 

SMALL FRY! 

The Noe Valley clothing store 
exclusively for children 

Entries are due on October 29 and 
winners will be announced on Halloween 

First prize will be a $25 gift certificate and 
second prize will be a $15 gift certificate 

• Specializing in comfortable 
and affordable play clothes, 
sleep wear, and dresses 

• Newborn. Toddler and Infant sizes 

• Children's sizes 4 to 14 

4066 24th Street (415) 648-3954 

In the heart of Noe Valley. Open 7 days a week. 




Voice columnist Roi>cr Rutin and wife Renee Koury show off their little Mazookster. Shayna 
PHOTO BY TOM WACHS 



HUNDREDS OF CHILDREN NEED 

HOMES IN SAN FRANCISCO 

Become a 
Foster Parent 

Foster parents receive support services, board 
and care payment and Medi-Cal for Children. 

For information, call Aspira Foster Family Services 759-0880 




Looking for an Elementary 
School for your Child? 

join us AT 
Alvarado School 

Noe Valley's Neighborhood 
Elementary School 

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 7th 10 AM TO NOON 
AT ALVARADO SCHOOL 
625 DOUGLAS 695-5695 

Come visit our classrooms, 
meet teachers and parents of current students 
and learn about Alvarado 's advantages — 
including our new on-site 
After School Care Program. 

(CHILD CARE WILL BE PROVIDED.) 



Page 36 



The Hot Valley Voice •■ October 1992 




New Summer Hours 
Beginning in May 
Wednesday through Saturday 
Dinner Begins at 6:00 p.m. 
Sunday Dinner Starts at 4:30 p.m. 



Wednesday (Old Thursday 
Friday and Saturday 
Sunday 

1136 Valencia 



10 am - 9:30 i»» 
II) am - 10 Mpm 

4 :30 pm - 9 pm 
San Francisco, ca 1 >aiio 




qRAVITY SPOT 

Cafe and Gallery 

415 • 282 • 4271 





National ______ 

Guild of g A ^ f 


> Wallpapering 




) €> Professional Paperhanging 


g—ml / rofessionol 

y \ J aper hangers, inc. 


& Wallcovering Removal. 


Free Estimates. 


Victor 


282-3879 



, . | |M| M J ..J.. I « l J l^ i n.V | | 1 -|V| t ^-^«l^^*lJ1:H!I.IIM:<*l:>iliKl-l.lBHl^ 




INSURANCE 



582 Market Street. 18th Floor 
San Francisco. CA 94104 
(415) 981-3915 



PO Box 2212 

Palm Springs, CA 92263 

(619) 320-3288 



TRAVEL • LIFE & MEDICAL « LIABILITY « FIRE • CRIME » WORKERS COMP « BONDS 



BED & BREAKFAST 

3755 Twentieth St. 
San Francisco 

94110 
(415) 647-8544 

1889 

An Authentic Victorian 




I had my children when I wanted. 
Thanks, Family Planning. 




Jltuv "pee *76&urfuf 



76c "Kefai Px+jtct 



Individuals • Couples • Families • Groups 

We are a nonprofit organization's post 
graduate internship program 
SF • East Bay 
5/0 » 2Z7 • 5767 




I Haul Cheap! 

LARGE 
& small jobs 

($25 Minimum) 

• Cleaning and hauling 

• Direct to the dump 

• Yard and Basement Cleanup 

Free Estimates — 991-3890 




RIRTH CONTROL PREGNANCY TESTS WOMEN'S HEALTH CARE 

FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES 

Confidential. Coring. Low cost. 



(415) 821-3050 FAX: (415)821-3112 
SFGH, Ward 6D, 1001 Potrero Ave., SF, CA 94110 



Bankruptcy 



Chapter 7 
Chapter 13 
Free Consultation 

Law Offices of 

August Bullock 

558-9222 

Convenient Civic Center location 




Pacific Family Practice Medical Group 

Robert K. Bolan, M.D. 
Maureen E. Flaherty, M.D. 
Daniel E. Roth, M.D. 
Mary E. Frank, M.D. 
Gloria Fudim, F.N. P. 



are pleased to announce their new associate 

Sophia N. Mirviss, M.D. 

AND THE OPENING OF THEIR NEW OFFICE LOCATED AT 

225 30th Street, Suite 100 
San Francisco, CA 94131 



Dr. Mirviss is a board certified family physician with a 
special interest in geriatrics who will be caring for patients 
of all ages in the new office located within the california 
Pacific Medical Center Senior Services Building. 
Bilingual English/Spanish. 



FOR APPOINTMENTS OR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CAIJ. 



(415) 206-9841 



THIS WINTER, 
THOUSANDS OF CHILDREN 
WILL BE STRICKEN 
WITH DIABETES. 
THE REAL TRAGEDY BEGINS 
WHEN THEY'RE TREATED 
FOR THE FLU. 



During flu season thousands of children 
are stricken with insulin-dependent diabetes. 
These children are usually between the ages of 
5 and 16. 

Unfortunately many parents and 
emergency-room personnel often confuse the 
warning signs of diabetes with the flu. Or. in 
some cases, unnary tract infection. 

The major warning signs for diabetes to 
watch out for are: frequent urination, excessive 
thirst, extreme hunger, dramatic weight loss, 
nausea and vomiting. As well as irritability 
weakness and fatigue. Generally these symp- 
toms appear over a three or four-week period, 
but don't appear as suddenly as flu symptoms. 

If the child is not treated immediately his 
or her blood sugar can go out of control leading 
to what is called diabetic ketoacidosis. Which 
in turn can lead to diabetic coma. The warning 
signs for diabetic ketoacidosis include excessive 
urination, great thirst, stomach pain, nausea 
and vomiting, dehydration which can lead to dry 
lips and sunken eyes, rapid breathing, followed 
by sleepiness. 

So this winter, do something to really pro- 
tect your child during flu season. 

Learn the symptoms of diabetes. 



A message from the 
an Diabetes Association. 



The Not- Valley Von r ■ o t tober 1991 



Page 37 



Adult Fiction 

The Hoy Without a Flan, by Abraham 
Rodriguez Jr., contains seven heartbreaking 
stories about what it's like to be a teenager 
on the streets of the South Bronx 

.» Cynthia Kadohata's novel In the Heart of 
the Valley of Love is set in the year 2052. 
and depicts a Japanese-American college 
student open to the possibilities of love in 
Spite Oi the corruption surrounding her. 

, v » In Lizardskin. C'arsten Stroud's latest 
novel, a Montana state highway patrolman 
investigating an armed robbery becomes 
entangled in a conspiracy ol corruption 

i* Lost in the City, by Edward Jones, is i 
collection of short stories that portray 
African-American men and women struggling 
to make it in "inner-city" Washington. D C. 

Adult Non-Fiction 

Published by Reader's Digest. America: 
I mid of Beauty and Splendor celebrates 
each of our 50 states with maps, charts, and 
photographic essays 

Citizen Koch, a candid autobiography by 
the former mayor of New York City, is hi led 
with reminiscences from Bd Koch's years in 
public life. 




r 



MORE Books to Read 



Librarians Roberta Greifer and Carol Small offer a selection of new books and old gems at the 
Noe Valley Library. 451 Jersey St. (near Castro). The branch is open Tuesdays. 10 a m to noon 
and I toop.m ; Wednesdays. I to9p m ; and Thursday through Saturday. I to6p m (695-5095). 



Mfc In Full Force, by Louis Banner, explores 
society's changing attitudes toward older 

women. 

Gene Mustafa's Murder Machine is an 
insider's account of organized crime that 
exposes the New York-based Roy f)e Meo 
gang and its Mafia connections. 

to Based on interviews with 400 indi- 
viduals. Transformed by the Light, by 
Melvin Morse. M D . examines the medical 
and psychological effects that near-death 
experiences have on people's lives. 

C hildren's Fiction 

I* In Paula Danziger's Forth to Matthew, 
Matthew Martin deals with sixth-grade 
ecology projects, parents who embarrass 
him. his rebellious older sister, and a class- 
mate who spells her name 'Mil!" (ages 10 
and up). 



Reading Jim Aylesworth's Country 
Crossing, you can experience the sights, 
sounds, and the quiet ol a lovely summer 
night (ages 3-5). 

A 16-year-old Blackfool Indian girl 
breaks with tradition when she teaches 
herself to ride a horse in Dawn Rider, by Jan 
Hudson (ages 10 and up) 

h\ In Wempires, by Daniel Pmkwaiei. 
Jonathan wishes to become a vampire, but is 
visited at midnight by three very surprising 
non-vampires (ages 5 and up). 



Children's Non-Fiction 

t± The many animals described in Safe in 
the Spotlight, by Elaine Scott, live at the 
Dawn Animal Agency, earning their keep by 
appearing in movies and TV shows (ages 6 
and up). 



A Young Fainter, by Zheng Zhensun and 
Alice Low. describes the lift and remarkable 
painting ability of Wang Yam. a 16-year-old 
who began her art career when just a toddler 
(ages 6 and up). 

?4 Wind tunnels, auto crash dummies, and 
simulated weightlessness can all he helpful 
to us — find out how in Almost the Heal 
Thing: Simulation in Your High-Tech World, 

by Gloria Skur/ynski (ages S and up) 

c v 4 II you are curious about the food, cloth- 
ing, and schools in Spain during the time of 
Columbus, read If You Were There in 1492, 
by Barbara Brenner (ages X and up). 




why did the cmcKEn 
CROJJ THE MAD 
TO GET TflL 
wot VALUT VOICE ? 



CALL &ZI- y)2J\ 




NATION OP 



I am having lun T-shirt 
$10.95 



Nation ol Pinheads T-shirt 




$10.95 



Toutk Adult 
SiTt S ■ i it S ■ L u 

Send $1 for complete 
ZIPPY CATALOG 

LAST GASP 7160 BRYANT ST. SAN FRANCISCO. CA 94110 




Graphic* Design 



i-OESKTOP-PUBLISHING 



We design Anything That Goes On Paper. 

f — -HMr ijjm Cn in em -ream/ 

*L,iii© 9 

1 200-2400 dpi PRINT OUTS 



Upstairs at 2338 Market 
■ 111 I ■■■till TCT 



M-Th 9 am-8 pm • Fn 9 am-6 pm • Sal 10am-5pm 

(415) 863-1877 

▼ In-House Graphic Designers 

▼ Desktop Publishing 

▼ IBM to Mac Conversion 

▼ Laserprinting/Scanning 

▼ Mac Rentals 

▼ Fax 



Zeslop Publishing 

a women ol color-owned business 



Do you believe you need to look great before you even walk into 
a gym? I did, so maybe I can help out. 

My trainers and I specialize in working with our-of-shape people, men and women 
who may he afraid or who may want rhe privacy and attention that we otter. In our 
private "one-on-one" studio, the experience we share is fun, healthy and 
constructed to your individual needs. We are compassionate, humorous and 
dedicated to helping you make a difference in the level of health in your life. 

Free weight area • Cardiovascular machines • Multi-station exercise equipment 




Your Personal Best 

Roy Cameron 415 553-8635 



CARROLL'S 




BOOKS 



TUESDAY 
READINGS 



OCTOBER 13,8 PM 
Marie Henry and Donald Schenker 

OCTOBER 27, 8 PM 
John M. MacGregor 
author of The Discovery of the Art of the Insane 



CARROLL'S BOOKS 

1 1 93 Church Street (at 24th) 647-3020 FREE 

Sunday - Thursday 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM 
Friday and Saturday 10:00 AM - 10:00 PM 



LARRY FORSBERQ 

Certified Acupuncturist 
Chinese Herbologist 




Medi-Cal • Worker's Comp. 
Private Insurance 

1201 Noe St • 207-9878 




We 
Refer 
Tradespeople 

The Trades Guild makes 
finding a contractor easy! 
Call our FREE consumer 
referral service for local 
architects, engineers, and 
contractors. All members 
are personally interviewed 
and carefully screened. 
Call us first! 



• Additions 

• Alarms 

• Architects 

• Cabinets 

• Carpentry 

• Chimney Svc. 

• Counter Tops 

• Drywall 

• Electrical 



• Engineers 

• Flooring 

• Foundations 

• Landscaping 

• Painting 

• Plumbing 

• Remodeling 

• Roofing 

• Tree Service 



and many more! 




Ask for our free directory! 



Call 777-4045 



Page 38 



The Noe Valley Voice ■ October 1992 



EXPfcRT GARDENING, landscaping, carpentry 
tree work Water-saving, irrigation, pruning, 
maintenance, repair, construction Wood, stone, 

brick. concrete Kolojjk.il pcsl control $20/man- 
hour. Gary. 821-4826 

NADA YOGA: Tuning the Inner Self. MUTOg* 
Booker and special guest will be giving concerts 
with sessions of kirtan (chanting) Friday. Oct. 2. 
7:30 p.m $5, Integral Yoga Institute. 770 Dolores 
St..S.F. 821-1 1 17 

DESPERATELY SEEKING SANITY? Experienced, 
compassionate psychotherapist, who works with 
men and women going through difficult life transi- 
tions, offers affordable depth psychotherapy in Noe 
Valley. Elizabeth Feldman. M.F.C.C. 749-7615 
(Sliding scale and insurance accepted ) 

SHARED HOUSING. Twocalm. Quiet, non-party- 
ing, non smoking women over 35 seek same to 
share large Victorian Hat with two cats. $341 plus 
utilities lirsi and last month rent in advance An- 
nual tour percent increase. Available approximately 
Sept 22. 641-8812, 8 B.ni. to 5 p.m. 

MAN WITH A VAN Moving, hauling, trucking. 
$30/hour. plus 30 cents a mile Gary. 821-4826. 

RENTALS OFFERED: 22 years serving San Fran- 
cisco with pride Our property leasing and manage- 
ment program offers dedicated customer service 

from qualified professionals Call today to see how 

we can assist you 252-6292. 

EXPERIENCED COUPLES THERAPIST can help 
you re-find your partnership feelings, make your re- 
lationship .i safei place, and bring the goodies back 
into your love. Structured and insight work give you 
tools to handle your own problems. Call Al Crowell. 
M.F.C.C. , 755-4164 Nik Valley office. 

ENGAGEMENT BROKEN Must sacrifice two- 
third-karat diamond solitaire ring. 14 karat yellow 
gold. Appraised $.1,650 (have papers) Asking 
$1,475. 648-5679 

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT, corner of 24th Street 
and Castro in Noe Valley. One room, about 170 
square feet, trim and clean with new carpeting and 
paint Old Victorian charm Adjoining kitchen to 
share as kitchen and/or waiting room Computer 
and two-line telephone hook-up in place $350 per 
month including utilities Call 821-4744. 

MACROBIOTIC COOKING CLASS Learn how 
to prepare simple, delicious and fun macrobiotic- 
dishes. Saturday. Oct. 3. 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m 
$25. Integral Yoga Institute. 770 Dolores St.. S.F 
821-1 1 17. 

SHARE LARGE. SUNNY six-room flat. deck, 
with teacher Qu\ei non-smoker $624/month plus 
utilities. Cat okay. Call Juanita. 285-3386. 

VEGETARIAN WORMS' That's right Worms 
love to recycle your veggie scraps into rich soil. 
Save landfill space. Call Yahoo Compost Service. 
We'll pro\ ide a bunch of worms in a handsome box. 
648-YAHO. 

LICENSED AND BONDED CONTRACTOR Let 
me fix your house problems, legally. Remodels, 
conversions, updates. Windows, doors, roofs and 
floors, plumbing, electrical. Home or income prop- 
erly. Sheerwallmg and quake-proofing Many local 
references and regular customers. Call Fred. 337- 
9324. License no. 546283. 

BIG BOX OF BABY CLOTHES (no stains), diaper 
wraps. $50; Evenflo soft baby carrier, clean. $20; 
baby walker, clean, collapsible, $20; Evenflo infant 
carseat with canopy, clean. $50. 239-7369 



ARNOLD'S 
CLEAN 
SWEEP 

Houteclcaning Par Excellence 



• RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL 

CINDY ARNOLD -431-2919 

Quality Cleaning Since 1984 



T U G G E Y'S 



Hardware for the handperson 
Denny Giovannoli 



Tndl 



3885 24th Street 
San Francisco, CA 94114 
415-282-5081 



Alarming Sale 
Security Alarm Special 
$395 Installed! withtfood 
(For your home ot business) 
This System is Fully Monitored! 
Please Coll Us for a Free Estimate (4 IS) 753-5634 



DETECT • ALL 



51 ' i mny SYSTEMS 



L<xoied in Not Volley 

Homes • Commercial • Apartments • Central Monitoring 

Ucmm/UOOIIM 



CLASS ADS 



COUPLES THERAPY. Proven methods help you 
discover the love and joy in your relationships 
Chronic conflict often stems from unresolved child- 
hood issues M) methods locus on healing these 
wounds in the context of the current relationship, 
Safe, non-confrontivc environment, sliding lee 
Scale Nornuin Hermg. M F.C.C intern no 19790; 
supervised by Al Crowell. M.F.C.C. 826-1 128 _ 

NEED PEOPLE WHO SEW to put my company 
labels into garments Noe Valley location or your 
own home Leslie. 206-0404 

HELP WITH TRANSITIONS: Discover new per- 
spectives, identify choices, understand best use of 
energies, enjoy reviializalion in relationships, 
creativity, right livelihood, spiritual path. Twenty 
years' experience Rebecca Radner. psychic con- 
sultant 363-8746. 

DOUBLE BED: 50-year-old traditional style repro- 
duction of four-poster bed Excellent condition. 
Dark wood Mattresses not included S250 Cull any 
time. 824-2624. 

SHEEP DUNG ESTATES! Remote cottage on 160 
acres in Anderson Valley Dogs welcome. $75/ 
night. (707 ) 895-2774. Unit 5285. 

RITA S GARDENING SERVICE: 10 yean, of ex- 
perience References. Complete maintenance. $11 
per hour Call 282-7360. 

LOANS! Specializing in real estate purchases and 
refinances. Outstanding service and competitive 
rates are what satisfy our customers Monterey 
Mortgage. 10 Monterey Blvd., S.F 584-0970. 

JAY'S CARPENTRY AND PAINTING. Stairs, 
decks, finish woodwork or framing Interior or ex- 
terior painting Small/big |obs References 665- 
9652 

MEDITATION WORKSHOP This is a practical 
workshop that will enable students to begin earnest 
meditation on their own This program is designed 
both to help beginners and those needing to re- 
inspire their practice. Thursday. Sept. 24. 7:30 
p.m. Integral Yoga Institute. 770 Dolores St.. S.F. 
821-1117. 

FOR THE FIRST TIME in several years, the Noe 
Valley Ministry. 1021 Sanchez St (between 23rd 
and 24th) has day-use space available, including 
some weekend slots, suitable for ongoing or one- 
time acting or dance classes, rehearsals, meetings, 
etc. For information call Karen Heather at 282 
2317. 

STEREO REPAIR Save time' Save money! Offer- 
ing in-home stereo repair at reasonable rates. For- 
merly with Pacific Stereo; now serving the San 
Francisco community for 10 years. References. 
Guarantee. Gene s Sound Service. 553-3751. 

SUBLET ONE-BEDROOM "townhouse" in Noe 
Valley Quiet area, good parking $725. Four- 
month minimum. 550-0420. 

HARMONICA LESSONS taught right here in your 
neighborhood by pro Blues, pop. country. Begin- 
ners through advanced Sliding scale. 648-7858. 

FLAT FOR RENT $850. 26th and Fair Oaks. Large, 
light, two bedrooms, multiple closets. Garage 
Water/garbage included. Close to Muni/BART. No 
pets Shown by appointment. (209) 722-8617. 



beverly mesch, cmt, cht 



healing, relaxing 

massage 
hypnosis 
reiki 




gift certificates 



$30/Hour (415)821-4123 




Expert Painter 

Educated, 20 years experience 

Lie. No. 556858 
Victorian Portfolio 

HIGHEST QUALITY AT THE 
LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICE. 

All painting problems, options, 
procedures, and materials 
explained in detail 

Richard Schaedel 383-1847 



PLASTER REPAIR 

Fine Interior Painting 
Call: Robert Gill 

Calif. Lie. # 302079 Since 1 974 

558-0658 
★ ★★★★★★★★ 



LIVING TAI CHI CHUAN: Simplified, practical 
essentials for meditative and health benefits Begin- 
ners, working people come |o.n us Monday 
through Thursday. Noe Valley Ministry 6-7:30 
p.m $5 introduction. Chris Seque.ra. 756-085/. 

BIRD GOWN NEEDED Looking for someone 
who can make durable cloth bird gown as part of 
bird costume Can pay about $100. Call Jim, 641- 
0102 

PLATFORM BED. OAK DOUBLE with six built- 
in under-bed drawers. Excellent condition. $350/ 
best offer. 282-8030. 

FOR RENT Noe Valley Victorian home, three bed- 
rooms, one bath, semi-modern kitchen and bath, 
newly polished hardwood floors, garage, large 
yard $2,000. 824-6330. evenings. 647-0695. 

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3rd. 408 30th St at San- 
chez Neighborhood garage sale. Toys, children's 
clothes, household goods, and much much more. 9 

a.m. 

VIDEO SERVICE: Video production, inventory 
(home/olfice)., weddings, parties, training, talents, 
documentaries, insurance claims, graduations, any 
type. Mose. 337-9003. 

GUITAR WANTED Martin. Fender. Gibson. Cash 
paid. 648-7858 

COUNSELING/TOOLS FOR CHANGE I provide 
a safe, nurturing environment to help you clarify 
times of transition, heal old wounds, release hinder- 
ing patterns, and create positive changes in your 
life. Esther Goldman, M A. 431-1066 Reasonable 
rates. 

TRANSFORM YOUR JUNGLE into a paradise. 
Pruning, planting, maintenance, lawns, irrigation, 
clean-ups. Call Jorge at 826-7840 for free esti- 
mates Monthly rates 

I BUY RECORDS: LPs. 45s. 78s, sheet music, etc. 
239-5390 

LICENSED PAINTER Small, large jobs. Interior, 
exterior. Also expert plaster repair. License no. 
497-214. Please call Ed at 995-4666 Free estimates. 

ATTENTION EXCELLENT INCOME for home 
assembly work 504-646-1700 Dept. P5I39. 

PET CARE PLUS. Loving pet care in your home. 
Excellent references, reasonable rates, bonded. 
Alice Mabry, 647-6914. 

SOUP-TO-NUTS event planning/management— 
corporate functions to nationwide meetings. We 
work with your budget No event too large or small. 
Call today for details! Creative Services. 824-7194 

WANTED: GARAGE TO RENT Professional 
woman seeks garage, vicinity Church. Army. Do- 
lores streets. Sub-compact car. Call 824-9745. 

SPIRITUAL COMPANY, a new non-sectarian 
meditation and discussion group is meeting in the 
neighborhood. First and third Sundays of each 
month at 10:30 a.m. For more information call 
Marc at 647-9609. Free. 

CARPENTERS/HANDYMEN Remodeling and 
repair. Doors, drywall. decks Windows, wood- 
work, whatever Reasonable rates, references. Free 
estimates. Call Dan. 648-4326. 



An Alternative Phone Installation Service 

JACKS AND LINES ADDED. MOVED. REPAIRED 
Weekdoy Evenings 

Alice Heimsoth • (415)647-5683 



dm A Chance 

, IN 
Rower beds 
your child's qarden 
a medicine wheel 
an Autumn vegetable natch 

FR££ OnUMDI J ' 




\oraet Me 'N* GARDENS * 206 



9106 



Leave It To Nacho 

Cleaning & Hauling 



Garage, Basement & Yards 
Construction Site Clean-ups 



Free Estimates— Reasonable Rates 

* 415 875-4394 




WANTED- A GARAGE TO RENT I need a place 
to store my motorcycle and some furniture for one- 
year beginning sometime in October Call 647-7912 

CARE FOR CAREGIVERS. A special workshop 
by Sri Swami Prakashananda Ma locustng on rela 
|!on, breathing practices, meditation and imagery 
thai will help you get the nurturing you need l ues 
day. Oct. 6. 7:30 p m. $5. Integral Yoga Institute. 
770 Dolores St.. S.F. 821-11 17 

BED AND BREAKFAST with private entrance 
garden Reasonable rates, monthly available 282- 
8983. 

TUPPERWARE. Exciting new catalog and great 
hostess gift specials Excellent income opportunity. 
Call for free catalog and information Louise 641 
7032. or leave message. 588-8393. 

PC SOFTWARE FOR SALE Major vendors Cur- 
rent versions. David. 647-6155. 

WHY F.AT OUT? Treat yourself to the convenience 
of gourmet vegetarian dining in your own home. I 
will deliver exciting and diverse meals to your 
doorstep. My cuisine is naturally low in fat. cho- 
lesterol, and salt Call now for your October menu 
Gift certificates available. Jane. 826-2133. 

FORMAL CHAIRS: Two gold velour chairs with 
bottom wood trim; excellent condition; $600 for 
pair. 239-5325. 

FEELING STUCK? Psychotherapy and counseling 
for change and empowerment Life transitions, re- 
lationship problems, anxiety and depression can be 
worked through with caring assistance. My special- 
ty areas include: recovery from sexual abuse, al- 
cohol and drug problems, and sexual orientation 
issues Carol Gipson. licensed M PC C no 28429. 
Noe Valley office. (510)428-9161 

IT'S YOUR MOVE. But I can help. Professional 
organizer will handle any and all of your moving 
needs. Offices/storcs/homes/apartments. Free con- 
sultation Call Deborah. 621-3425. 

HOUSECLEANING. 267-4880. Looking for excel- 
lence'' Always high quality, consistent, systematic 
work 15 years' excellent local references. Superior 
house cleaner seeking new clients Weekly, bi- 
weekly, or spring cleaning available Deana. 

MOVING TRAUMA' Specialist in packing kitch- 
ens, fine china, glass, art and electronics. Superb 
care. work, references. Home or office. Free bind- 
ing estimate. Cardinal Packing. 759-5638. 

DESPERATELY SEEKING GARAGE, vicinity of 
Sanchez and Elizabeth. 282-6751 

DEEP RELAXATION WORKSHOP Learn how to 
use deep relaxation in creative ways to release phys- 
ical and mental tension and reduce stress. Tuesday. 
Oct. 13. 7:30 p.m. $5. Integral Yoga Institute. 770 
Dolores St.. S F. 821-1117. 

COME TO ALASKA. Trade periodic use of your 
spare room (couch ') in San Francisco for use of 
mine in Anchorage. Approximately six weeks per 
year total time Will consider alternate trades (air- 
fare? $? services?). 267-1830. 

SHARE DAYCARE. We have a wonderful full-time 
babysitter available in your home and ours. Prefer 
infant and walking distance to Jersey and Castro 
Call Kris at 648-0106. 

HOUSESITTER/PETSITTER. Wonderful 38-yew-. 
old woman loves animals and plants. Seeking house- 
sitting position, weekend to ? Professional house- 
cleaner Spring cleanings also available while you're 
gone. Please leave message. Deana. 267-4880. 



PIANO LESSONS 

IV I til 

DEBBIE 
PORYES 



For children ol all ages 

• (.I.iv.i<*i reading 
and popular styles 

• Patient, supportive, fun 
For adults of all levels 

• Specializing in \au with 
emphasis on ear-lraining 
and theory 

15 years eipenence. 
including 6 years on the 
faculty ol the Dutch National 
Conservatory. Holland 



A musician who 
enjoys teaching 

863-7350 



SELDNER 
ECRETARIAL 
ERVICES 

(415) 824-2720 
4077A 24th Street 
San Francisco, CA 94114 

WORD PROCESSING 

• Legal • Resumes 

• General Correspondence 




BRIGHT 
PLUMBING 

STEINER AT DUBOCE 

Complete Plumbing Service 

626-3884 



Licensed Service #316855 



Estimates 
Given 



Remodel 
& Repair 



The Noe Vallex Voice • October 1992 



Page 39 



HAULING/MOVING Schlcpper Brothers (Food 
Not Bombs activists) Quick, lair, experienced, 
over-qualified. Large truck 824-4214 

BODYWORK BY MARC Gentle to deep tissue 
Swedish/Esalen massage in a private, relaxing at- 
mosphere Refresh body mind/spirit Available af- 
ternoons, evenings, weekends S40 for 90 minutes 
Neighborhood location 647-9609 Ask for Marc 

JUST PLAIN GOOD THERAPY Brief counsel- 
ing, crisis help or in-depth work offered to individu- 
als and couples of "all sexual persuasions" by well- 
aged, intuitive, perceptive, and highly skilled coun- 
selor who has seen, heard and experienced a broad 
range of life's challenges Upper Glen Park. cm 
parking Jeanne Adleman. M A 5K5-0666 

DAYTIME WOMEN'S GROUP forming Contact 
Jeanne Adleman. M A . 585-0666 See above for 
description 

CAT & PLANT CARE in your home while you're 
away Daily visits by experienced, mature woman, 
recommended by several veterinarians and satisfied 
clients Not Valley resident 20 years Non-smoker 
Bonded Anna-Kajs ( A-K ). 648-8 132 

HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS Is your relation- 
ship in trouble ' Are you in a good relationship that 
hjs occasional difficulties that you would like to gel 
through more quickly or less painfully ' Relation- 
ship counseling with a problem-solving focus avail- 
able in Noe Valley lor individuals or couples Insur- 
ance accepted. Valerie Hearn. Ph.D. 824-3701 

NOE PAINTING/REMODELING CO Your per 
manent house painter. Exterior-interior. Fast, 
clean References. $20/hour or bid Call Adam. 

824-7787. 

HANDiMEN Home repair, plaster, pami prep, 
paint ready Walls, doors, windows, and floors Til- 
ing and refinishing Maintenance, electrical, and 
plumbing Olivier. 826-8766 

GUITAR LESSONS: Professional player and teach- 
er, over 25 years' experience, close to Noe Valley. 
Tom Schwabenlander. 861-4721 

GARY FRANKS IS NOW AT Angelo s Hair Salon. 
Electrolysis and Swedish massage 600 Ellis St. 
Monday through Saturday. 9 a m to 7:30 p.m. Full 
hair service salon. Ask for Gary or Angclo, 673- 
7628 Special $15 hair cut Perm S50. Color $35. 
Sunday only by appointment. Angelo is at 3931 
18th St behind Marcel Hair Salon. Mam to 4 
p.m. 673-7628 Marcel's shop is open Wednesday 
through Saturday. II a.m. to 6 p m 863-5187 $2 
off any haircut with this ad Expires 10/31/92 Void 
Saturdays 

HOUSECLEANING Heavenly Maids, vacancy 
cleaning specialists' 239-0561 

STEAM CLEAN CARPETS plus upholstery and 
drapes Low prices, honest and reliable Call Ran- 
dall. 864-9430 

ALWAYS BUYING ENTIRE ESTATES or single 
items Antiques to junk Call 668-2220. 

CHRISTIAN ENTREPRENEUR NEWSLETTER 
needs your Christian articles, poems, advertise- 
ments, etc P.O. Box 27323. S.F..CA 94127-323 

WORD PROCESSING Manuscripts, reports, pa- 
pers, resumes. Editing, proofreading Laser print- 
ing Reasonable rales. Joanne. 431-0603. 

HOUSECLEANING Give yourself a gift— a clean 
home' I am thorough, responsible, have reasonable 
rates References. Call Lulu. 641-8817 



CLASS ADS 



EYE OF THE DAY 

A METAPHYSICAL 5 & DIME 

FOR QUALITY PRODUCTS AT REASONABLE PRICES 
250 FILLMORE ST 
SAN FRANCISCO 
CALIFORNIA 
941 17 

(4151 863 9268 
HOURS 

TUE-FRI 1 PM- 8 PM 
SAT I I AM-8 PM 

SUN 1 PM-7 PM 



*************************** 

ASTROLOGY 

Readings and Counseling 



* 
* 
* 
♦ 
* 

« 
* 
« 
* 
« 

« 
* 
* 

* 

*************************** 



Life Purpose • Direction 
Relationships • Self-Acceptance 

Renee 647-8366 



U PSTAI RS / DOWNSTAI RS 

I.F.I ANTIQUES DEPARTMENT STORE 

890 VALENCIA AT 20TH 
647-4211 

HOURS: 
MON-SAT11-6 SUN 1-5 



VICTORIANA BED & BREAKFAST You will 
love the charm and hospitality of our Victorian hed 
& breakfast in Noe Valley Private spacious room 
with separate entrance, lull kitchen, antiques, pri- 
vate modern bath, and more 64 1 -7442 

MIND YOUR OWN BUSINESS? Professional or- 
ganizer comes to the rescue I can structure your 
office, clear your desk, systemi/e your files, main- 
tain your finances Get back to the work you love, 
let me do the rest Free consultation Call Deborah 
62 1 -3425. 

STOREFRONT FOR RENT. Potrero Hill, corner 
20th and Connecticut, good neighborhood. 24-foot 
glass front, high ceilings, almost 500 square feet 
Remodeled, great for designers, architects, or small 
retail store Good parking. 285-3449. 

HANDIER ANDY Carpentry, tile work, drywall. 
painting, electrical, light plumbing, decks and 
fences. Competitive rates free estimate Refer- 
ences Call Andy. 587-4363 

EXPERT AFFORDABLE HOUSECLEANING by 
mature women References Options Referral Ser- 
vices, a non-profit community service Options Fqi 
Women Over 40. 626-2 1 28 

COMPLETE GARDENING SERVICE Creative, 
etlicient and experienced Design creation, consul- 
tations Pruning, planting, maintenance and clean- 
ups 626-I258. 

BED AND BREAKFAST Noe Valley. 826-I I58 
PLUMBING 648-0432 

CAT CARE/INDOOR GARDENER Experienced 
and sensitive cat-sitting, mail forwarding, plant- 
sitting — consultations, design, maintenance, natu- 
ral pest control Jill Rebecca Bloom. 695-7930. 

CARPENTRY AND PAINTING Interior/exterior, 
minimum on small jobs Local references Sandy. 
585-6542. 

WINDOW REPAIRS Replace broken glass, ropes 
and putty Small carpentry and household repair 
jobs. Free estimates I am always on time. City 
Window Service 337-9327 

PET TENDERS Reliable love and care for your 
pets, plants, and home while you're away Refer- 
ences on request Bonded Scott. 550-8306 

VISITING HAMILY AND FRIENDS will enjoy the 
lovely Noe Valley home, gracious hostess, and 
scrumptious breakfasts at Li/'s Bed and Breakfast 
648-25I5. 

CUSTOM DRAPES, fabric shades, custom quilt 
ing, bedspreads, comforters, bed accessories, slip- 
covers, headboard slipcovers, any type of custom 
quilting services, your design or ours. Call Doris. 
337-9003. 

PIANO FOR EVERYONE Children, adults, be- 
ginning, intermediate, advanced Playing the piano 
provides stimulus, enrichment, and pleasure. 
Suzuki and traditional methods available Experi- 
enced instructor Patricia Avery. 550-8299 

CLEANINGHOUSE. Home, office, apartment and 
apartment building maintenance cleaning Regular, 
one-time Moving in. moving out ' Spring cleaning' 
Roger Miller. 664-05 1 3 References. 




Grace San tana 415/641-4740 

Plumbing Contractor • Lie 525396 



Phyllis S. Shulman, mfcc 

A Psychotherapy Practice 

Individual Adults & 
Adolescents 
Couples & Families 
Play Therapy for Children 

285-4724 




Pro Touch 

Painting * Decorating 
Restoration Specialist 

Licensed * Ensured 
Kieran Hegartv 

731-9103 

Call today for a free estimate 



LYNDA THE GARDENER Complete landscape 
service Experienced and skilled professional 
craftspeople. Redwood fences, decks, and arbors 
Brick, stone, concrete: walls, walks, and patios Ir- 
rigation, lawns, plantings, expert pruning and 
maintenance Let us install your dream garden 
Serving Noc Valley since 1986 Free estimate Re- 
ferrals License no 543983 Lynda, 759-1335. 

THE TRAVELING MECHANIC Tune-ups. brakes, 
general repairs, foreign and domestic, 18 years* ex- 
tensive experience, all work guaranteed $40 an 
hour, house calls Giorgio. 647-3403 Licensed and 
certified 

ACCOUNTING SERVICES, payroll, tax prepara- 
tion User-friendly CPA specializes in small busi- 
nesses and individuals Reasonable rales. '/.'-hour 
tree consultation Ten percent discount on tax prep- 
aration when you mention this ad Call Jack W 
Mahan at 826-2958. 

GRANDMA'S HOUSECLEANING SERVICE 
Complete old-lashioned house-cleaning Weekly, bi- 
weekly, or monthly "Doing Work with Pride" since 
1970 Bonded and' insured 252-5360 

LOOK AND FEEL YOUR BEST One-on-onc fit- 
ness Professional, affordable, personalized B A 
in physical education Certified personal trainer 
Anne. 821-1539 

MASSAGE FOR WOMEN Swedish/Shiatsu In- 
tuitive bodywork relaxes muscles, improves circu- 
lation, and balances energy Be cared lor and enjoy 
a greater sense of well-being with a soothing profes- 
sional massage from Leigh. 285-8535. Noe Valle> 
Sliding scale Gift certificates 

LINOLEUM FLOORS INSTALLED Coving. Kofi 
tile, advice. Per. 563-9039 

DOES ROVER NEED TRAINING ' Exercise * A 
ride to the vet'' Want to be sure Fluffy is content 
while you're away ' Positively Pets can help' Train- 
ing, problem-solving, pet-sitting, geriatric care, 
exercise, transportation. Ten years' experience- 
Bonded References available Senior discounts 
647-2463 

BOOKKEEPING SERVICES: 824-2151 

PAINT FOR LESS Quality work by experts Patch 
and plaster, thorough prep Quick, clean, and me- 
ticulous Very reliable. Excellent references Try us. 
you'll like us! 255-1506 

AMIR WINDOW WASHING COMPANY Free 
estimate Inside, outside, homes, shops, all glass 
Neat and reliable 826-8958 

TEXTILE RESTORATION Textile artist and ex- 
perienced restorer offers high quality and econom- 
ical repairs of tapestry, oriental and Native Ameri- 
can ruys. kilim and other textile handicrafts Mount- 
ing and display services also 552-8580. 

NEW IMPROVED NOE S NEST bed and break- 
last Unit A private entrance, private bath, kitchen- 
ette, queen bed Cute and cozy Unit B view, pri- 
vate bath. deck, fireplace, hot tub. queen bed Unit 
C ultra-view, private bath, steam room, parlor, 
king bed. fireplace and deck All with cable and 
VCR Masseuse and daycare available Contact 
Sheila. 821-0751 



ONGOING GROUPS 
for Women in their 20s 

Explore trial, intimacy, isolation, fami- 
ly. Individual and couple* counseling 
also available. 

Susan Regan 

MFCC Intern IMF20046 
Sup Thomas Miehahelles MFCC 
MV023074 

415-442-1923 

SAN FRANCISCO 



TelephoneTechnician 



Phone Systems 
Private Lines 
FAX Line 



441-7689 
Rafael 




LAW OFFICES OF 

Christine Del Sherpa 

3929 24th STREET • 647-2800 



Wills • Trusts • Probate 
Planning for Long Term Care 
Guardianships • Conservatorships 
Home Visits 



TELEPHONE INSTALLATION and repair. 31 
years" experience Business K I S a Specialty. Res- 
identical jacks installed and repaired Call Gene. 
826-8419. 

SPIRITUAL READINGS by Wayne Avilla What 
is most important lor you now ' Are you able to 
remain flexible and adaptive to the many unex- 
pected happenings lile can bring ' In spite of mate- 
riality, is doubt limiting what you can do and be this 
lifetime'' I provide a I '/:-hour counseling and heal- 
ing Utilizing the sacred symbol of the rose and an 
aura reading, including information from the chak- 
ras The atmosphere is comfortable, relaxed, 
amused, and in my country home in Noc Valley 
Charge is $39 by appointment only. 824-3542 
Graduate Psychic Hori/ons Ordained minister. 
Church of Natural Grace 

SUPERLATIVE WORD PROCESSING Experi- 
enced professional M A English/M S W Under- 
standable advice Business, academic, legal, res- 
umes, manuscripts Expert editing FAX machine 
Notary Public Laser printing Good rates! Call 
anytime 824-7736 

POETRY WANTED: The Noe Valley Voice wel- 
comes submissions ol poetry related to neighbor- 
hood themes, people, or places Payment upon pub- 
lication Send submissions with SASE (and a phone 
number, please) to the Noc Valley Voice. 1021 San- 
chez St.. San Francisco. CA 94114 

TEE SHIRTS. CANVAS BAGS, HATS printed 
with your logo/art. Cheap prices, quality work, 
quick turnaround Great lor businesses, parties, 
special events Call today lor quote Creative Ser- 
vices. 824-7194. 

LESSONS IN THE ALEXANDER TECHNIQUE 
Change habits that interfere with coordination and 
the learning ol skills For lessons and information, 
call Jerry Sontag at 861-6830 or Anne Bluethenthal 
at 864-6683 

DAYCARE Fresh air, games, exercise, learning, 
fun and love Openings for toddlers ages I to 3 in 
Noe Valley Call Hanni at 282-7777. 



How to Use 
Voice Class Ads 

The rate for classified advertising in ihe 
Noe Valley Voice is 25c a word Just type or 
prinf your copy, multiply the number of words 
by 25c (we trust you), enclose a check or 
money order for the full amount, and mail it 
to us by the 15th of the month preceding the 
month of issue 

It also would be a big help if you would 
indicate whether you are renewing an ad from 
a prev ious issue and. if so. include a copy of 
fhc published ad with your renewal. 

Recession Discount: The Voice comes out 
10 times a year (we don't publish in January 
and August) If you decide to place the same 
class ad in 10 issues (a year s worth), you are 
entitled to a 10 percent discount Just deduct 
10 percent from the total amount due for 10 
issues. 

To get in the November issue, please mail 
your ad and check — made payable to the Noe 
Valley Voice — so that we receive it by Oct. 
15. 1992. Our address is 1021 Sanchez St.. 
San Francisco. CA 94114 Sorry, but we are 
unable to accept phone or drop-in orders. □ 



Fine Trim and Finish 
Furniture. Cabinets, and Built-ins 
Loft Structures 
Entertainment Centers 
Decks and Garden Structures 
Fix-its and Home Repairs 

ReasonablefR«sponsible*Fdsridious 

C1I Kevin *t 
(4 IS) 64 7 0806 

Rclcfcncf*. Available 



m 



ROOF LEAKS? 

WATER DAMAGE? 

Call the Detective: 
Inspections. Patching. Caulking. 
Waterproofing 

Robt. Gill Co. 

558-0658 

LIC. #302079 SINCE 1974 



Remodeling 



Room Additions 



MULLINS PAINTING 

AND 

GENERAL 
CONSTRUCTION 

/ ICJ VSJ /). INSURl n 6 BONDED 
§601969 



700 DIAMONDS I kl | | (415)824-0110 
SF, 94114 I \ \ (415) 8244622 

Decks " Fences 




The Not Valley Voice ■ October 1992 



E N D A R 




OCT. f: The Noe Valley Ministry invites 
the neighborhood to a DISCUSSION ot 
"The Feminine Face ol God," led by 
Sherry Ruth and Patricia Hopkins 
7:30-9:15 pm. 1021 Sanchez St. 
285-7438 

OCT. 1 : Good Vibrations celebrates 
Banned Books Week with a BOOK 
PARTY and readings Irom The Erotic 
Impulse Honoring the Sexual Self. 
8- 10 pm 1210 Valencia St 550-7399 

OCT. 1-20: Marta Ayala exhibits her 
PAINTINGS in 'A Jungle in the Barrio." 
Hairy Bizness Gallery, 867 Valencia St 
826-1291. 

OCT. 1-17: Dancers' Group/Footwork 
kicks oil its EDGE FESTIVAL with "It We 
Only Knew." by the troupe Eth-Noh-Tec 
Thurs -Sat , 8 30 pm. 3221 22nd St 
824-5044 

OCT. 3: VOCALIST/STORYTELLER 
Rhiannon teams up with Gwen Jones 
on ancient instruments and pianist 
Frank Martin to pertorm "Sound 
Waves " 8 15 pm Noe Valley Music 
Series, 1021 Sanchez St. 647-2272. 

OCT. 3: The Noe Valley Merchants and 
Professionals Association sponsors an 
all-day FALL SIDEWALK SALE, ottering 
bargains throughout downtown Noe 
Valley For information, call Carol Yenne 
at Small Frys, 648-3954 

OCT. 3 & 10: Laughter of the Heart 
Players Lee Glickstem, David Roche, 
and Sandra O'Neal show off "The COM- 
EDY of Spirit." 8 pm Holy Innocents 
Church, 455 Fair Oaks St. 731-6640 

OCT. 4: The Golden Gate Boys Choir 
sings a medley from Fiddler on the 
Roof, and gives a CONCERT ot sacred 
and secular music by Haydn, Copeland, 
Debussy, and Rimsky-Korsakov. 3 pm. 
Mission Presbyterian Church. 3261 
23rd St. 647-8295 

OCT. 4-NOV. 5: "Family Values" is 
the theme ot the Autumn Annual ART 
SHOW at Gallery Sanchez Mon -Sat 
noon-5 pm, reception Oct 4, 2-5 pm 
Noe Valley Ministry. 1021 Sanchez St. 
282-2317 

OCT. 6: This is the deadline to register 
to VOTE in the Nov 3 general election 
Call the Registrar, 554-4375 

OCT. 6, 13 4 20: Children 3-5 are 
invited to preschool STORY TIME at 10 
am -Noe Valley Sally Brunn Library, 451 
Jersey St 695-5095 




S 



Vocalist Rhiannon will be making 
'Sound Waves ' in concert with Gwen 
Jones and Frank Martin at the Noe Valley 
Music Series on Saturday, Oct 3 



OCT. 7: Rozelle's Construclion offers a 
free HOME REMODELING seminar, 
covering how to choose a contractor 
and avoid remodeling nightmares 
6 30-8 30 pm. Noe Valley Sally Brunn 
Library, 451 Jersey St. 695-5095 

OCT. 7, 14, 21 & 28: Parents can 
bring Iheir infants and toddlers to the 
weekly LAPSUS at the branch library 
(Halloween costumes are encouraged 
on Oct 28) 7 pm Noe Valley Sally 
Brunn Library. 451 Jersey St. 695-5095 

OCT. 8: Ex-private investigator 
Elizabeth Pincus reads from Two-Bit 
Tango, hard-edge DETECTIVE FICTION 
with a feminist slant Old Wives' Tales, 
1009 Valencia St. 821-4675 

OCT. 8-NOV. 1: Humorist CHARLIE 
VARON perlorms "Honest Prophets" 
Thursday through Saturday, and gives 
"An Ounce of Prevention" on Sundays 
beginning Oct 11 8 pm. The Marsh, 
968 Valencia St. 641-0235. 

OCT. 10: The Noe Valley Ministry 
holds its annual FLEA MARKET and 
bake sale. 9:30 am-4 pm. 1021 Sanchez 
St 239-8129. 

OCT. 10: CASINO NIGHT, a fundraiser 
sponsored by the AIDS Support Group 
at Most Holy Redeemer Church, benefits 
all persons with HIV disease. 7 pm. 
4321 18th St 863-1581 

OCT. 10: The ROVA Saxophone Quartet 
premieres two pieces, Fred Ho's 
"Beyond Columbus and Capitalism," 
and Tim Berne's "Invisible Man." 815 
pm, Noe Valley Music Series, 1021 
Sanchez St 647-2272. 



OCT. 11: Three residents' groups 
sponsor the second annual Noe Valley 
NEIGHBORHOOD PARTY, featuring 
food, raffles, the "Moonwalk," a look 
inside a police car, and rock, blues, 
jazz, and Scottish music 11 30 am-5:30 
pm Upper Noe Rec Center, Day & 
Sanchez 641-5989 

OCT. 11: 0. Henry Award-winner 
Sylvia Watanabe reads from her collec- 
tion of SHORT STORIES. Talking to the 
Dead, set on Hawaii's Lahama coast 
7 pm. Modern Times Bookstore, 888 
Valencia St 282-9246 

OCT. 15: Dog-eared Books launches 
its "In a Dog's Ear" POETRY/MUSIC 
series with Irish bard Eddie Slack. 
Argentinian surrealist Carlos Suarez, 
and fiddle player John Caufield 8 pm 
1175 Valencia St 282-1901 

OCT. 17: Guitarist Eddie Duran and 
tenor saxophonist Madeline Duran 
perform a blend of SOUL AND SWING 
at the Noe Valley Ministry 8 15 pm. Noe 
Valley Music Series, 1021 Sanchez St 
647-2272 

OCT. 18: The neighborhood is invited 
to a DEDICATION CEREMONY and 
nameplate installation honoring Sally 
Brunn at the newly-renamed branch 
library 2 pm Noe Valley Sally Brunn' 
Library, 451 Jersey St. 695-5095 

OCT. 18: The choir of the First Presby- 
terian Church in Burlingame performs a 
CONCERT of English and Spanish 
hymn-anthems and American spirituals 
3 pm Mission Presbyterian Church. 
3261 23rd St 647-8295 

OCT. 18: The Mission Cultural Center 
presents "Notes from the Hood," a 
JAZZ and poetry jam. 5 pm 2868 
Mission St 821-1155. 

OCT. 19: "From Love and Relationship 
Addiction to Intimacy" is a free eight- 
week CLASS offered by the S.fi Commu- 
nity College Castro-Valencia Center 
6 30 pm Everett Middle School, 450 
Church St. 585-5212. 

OCT. 20: CARTOON ARTIST Allison 
Bechdel, author of Dykes to Watch Out 
For, gives a slide show/discussion of 
her work 7 30 pm Modern Times 
Bookstore, 888 Valencia St. 282-9246 

OCT. 22: Linda Ojeda discusses her 
updated handbook "MENOPAUSE 
Without Medicine." 8 pm. Old Wives' 
Tales, 1009 Valencia St. 821-4675 

OCT. 22-31: Elite Herman choreo- 
graphs and performs "Winter," an 
eclectic DANCE journey of a woman 
through life. Thurs.-Sat., 8:30 pm 
Dancers' Group/Footwork, 3221 22nd 
St 824-5044. 

OCT.23-NOV. 8: EITeatrode la 
Esperanza presents the world premiere 
of Roy Conboy's suspenseful DRAMA, 
Dancing with the Missing. Thurs -Sun , 
8:30 pm Mission Cultural Center, 2868 
Mission St 255-2320. 



OCT. 24: Donna Ambrogi discusses 
"PATIENT RIGHTS and Health Care 
Decisions" at the monthly meeting of 
the Older Women's League. 10 am. 601 
Dolores St. 626-6938 

OCT. 24: The Latino/a HIV/AIDS Health 
Fair will be held from noon to 5 pm in 
Dolores Park, Dolores & 18th Call 
476-3598, 621-1361, or 648-3702. 

OCT. 24: Stulf and sew your own 
personal garden protector in a SCARE- 
CROW-MAKING class led by Kemit. 1 
pm Randall Museum. 199 Museum 
Way 554-9600. 

OCT. 24: Psychic Horizons holds its 
monthly PSYCHIC HEALING FAIR 2-4 
pm Noe Valley Ministry, 1021 Sanchez 
St 346-7906 

OCT. 24: The Andean fusion band 
JIWASA links up with guitarist Alex de 
Grassi 815 pm. Noe Valley Music 
Series. 1021 Sanchez St 647-2272 

OCT. 24 & 25: A JAZZ FILM FESTIVAL 
at the Castro Theater features six San 
Francisco premieres, including Buster 
Keaton's silent feature The Cameraman 
429 Castro St 864-5449 for times. 

OCT. 25: Noe Valley Sunday Afternoons 
sponsors a CONCERT ol Renaissance 
and medieval music by the Festival 
Consort 7 pm Noe Valley Ministry, 
1021 Sanchez St. 282-2317 




Comedian Charlie Varon preaches 
anthro-evangelism in his one-man 
show 'Honest Prophets. ' running Oct 
8-31 at the Marsh photo by bruce cqok 



OCT. 25: Soprano Elender Wall and 
pianist Alma Batista celebrate Halloween 
with SPOOKY MUSIC from Bach to 
John Duke. Costumes are encouraged 
8 pm. S.F Community Music Center, 
544 Capp St. 647-6015. 

OCT. 26: A best costume contest and a 
prize raffle are featured at the Diamond 
Senior Centers HALLOWEEN DANCE 
Noon. 117 Diamond St 863-3507. 

OCT. 27: Preschoolers can watch the 
movie shorts Chicken Soup with Rice, 
The Happy L ion, and Mole and the 
Rocket -at 10 and 11 am And at 4 pm, 
the children's librarian will read SCARY 
STORIES to kids 6 and older Noe Valley 
Sally Brunn Library, 451 Jersey St 
695-5095 



~S*r6C -^(ZlPPlTH— 



AAMZtfieD, ZEReiMA, 
IS" BASED ort muTvAL 
ISN'T VT '" 



OKJC6 ItJ AujwilE, 

i wa\J£ prze- 

>A0oieSC6NT 06PCN- 
DEMTf. THAT MAtfeS 

mg a 6000 fAfuefl^ 

DOESN'T IT, 
PEAR 7 



omce 

lM A 
WHILE 



) 



AMD, S0M6- 
TiMES, I TAtf£" 
^0\J OUT TO 

bOeftj'T THAT 
Pl?OV/£ VAOV^ 

CAPe 0 



SOME- 
TIME f. 





Eth-Noh-Tec s Nancy Wang and Robert 
Kikuchi-Yngo/o play two reincarnated 
souls in the dance piece 'If We Only 
Knew. ' showcased Oct 1-17 at 
Footwork on 22nd Street 

PHOTO BY BOB HSIANG 



OCT. 28: Noe Valley residents who live 
south of Army Street are invited to a 
TREE-PLANTING planning meeting 
conducted by Friends of the Urban 
Forest. 7 pm Upper Noe Rec Center, 
Day & Sanchez. 824-1062 

OCT. 29: Neighborhood kids are asked 
to bring in their decorated or carved 
PUMPKINS for display in Small Frys' 
window on 24th Street The best 
pumpkins will be picked, and prizes 
awarded, on Halloween, 11 am. 4066 
24th St 648-3954. 

OCT. 29: Images of homosexual life in 
the 1930s intersect with remembrances 
from the 1990s in Barbara Hammer's 
first feature FILM, Nitrate Kisses. 7:30 
pm Castro Theater, 429 Castro St. 
552-FILM 

OCT. 30: The flower and gift shop Lily 
of the Valley sponsors a PUMPKIN- 
CARVING contest for all ages 4 pm. 
Visit 1515 Church St for contest rules, 
or call 695-1456 

OCT. 30: Dr. Caligan Nosferatu himself 
welcomes the neighborhood to the 
eighth annual SCAREHOUSE at Upper 
Noe Rec Center (recommended lor kids 
7 and up). 6-9 pm. Day & Sanchez 
695-5011 

OCT. 31: The Ina Chalis Opera Com- 
pany performs a high MYSTIC DRAMA, 
The Medium, and a humorous play, The 
Telephone, by Gian Carlo Menotti 4-6 
pm Noe Valley Ministry, 1021 Sanchez 
St. 282-2317 

OCT. 31: The "Haunted House Lady.' 
Marilyn Lucas, invites you to her 12th 
annual Noe Valley HAUNTED HOUSE, 
also known as the Freddy Kruger 
Memorial Chapel. (The first 300 
children receive bags ol treats.) 5-8:30 
pm Look for Captain Hook on the 300 
block ot Hoffman Ave . between 24th 
and Elizabeth 285-6265. 

OCT. 31: Zack Thompson performs 
"The Ragman," a ONE-MAN SHOW of 
music, comedy, and dance 8 pm 
Community Music Center, 544 Capp St 
647-6015. 




The Scoop on 
CALENDAR 

Please send calendar items before the 
15th day of the month preceding the 
month of issue to the Noe Valley Voice. 
1021 Sanchez St . San Francisco. CA 
94114. Items are published on a 
space-available basis, with Noe Valley 
neighborhood events receiving priority 
Note: The next issue of the Voice will 
appear Oct. 28. and will cover calendar 
events for the month of November The 
deadline for items is Oct. 15. 1992